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Old 09-13-2012, 06:53 PM   #21
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If you have a home that you are selling to move aboard and it is either paid for or you have substantial equity in it, you can use the proceeds to buy an income property. You then hire a management company to take care of the rental and all you do is receive the checks while cruising.

Others rent their homes but you will make less that way. An example is a home worth 500k will rent for $2300 a month but a 4plex worth 500k will rent for a total of around $3800 monthly. Plus a vacancy in a multi unit will not affect your income as much as it would a single family home.

There you have it. Another way to make money while cruising. And if you add one more property,you might be able afford marina to marina cruising instead of being on the hook all the time.
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Old 09-13-2012, 11:13 PM   #22
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I run a digital interactive software company with employees in the U.S. and abroad. On the boat I have WIFI with an external antenna access/point networked to a local WIFI network for multiple devices. If anybody wants to know how to do this, just ask, it greatly extends the range and signal strength.

During the summer we typically run to the boat Thursday night and stay through Monday. The other days I work out of my home office.

Working from a laptop, even a really good one, doesn't give you the screen real estate you get in an office and that does cost you some productivity. It is also going to give you neck and back cramps after long hours. The other challenge is that marine WIFI is generally "recreational" and is not all that reliable, or fast - if you're used to making video Skype calls, you may have troubles.

In my business we transfer a lot of files, artwork, chunks of code, etc. to do this easily I remote desktop into my office to take advantage of the bandwidth.

That being said, it's a real pleasure to be in a meeting where everyone else is stuck in an office, and you're on the boat. I generally don't tell clients where I am :-)
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:48 AM   #23
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Sea Moose-you wouldn't want to have clients think that they are paying for your life on a big, luxurious yacht!
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Old 09-14-2012, 02:00 AM   #24
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There are many ways to make $$ while cruising as evidenced by the postings. While I practice law & accounting on land, for several years before grad and law school I was a photographer primarily following the PGA tour. I started doing a fair amount of outdoor photography and building inventory with stock photo agencies. That was a lot of years ago when we shot slides and there were many stock agencies. Most are gone and now everything is digital. But the huge stock agencies that remain, notably Getty Images and iStock (now owned by Getty) have literally multiple millions of images on file for sale. They put your images up for sale and pay you a %. Almost all sales now are internet based. So I started again about 7 years ago building up stock. This was looking forward to the day we would be cruising for good. I have built up about 125,000 images in stock now, unfortunately, that is only yielding about $20k per year, but, I keep shooting and building stock. You have to pay attention to what the agencies say they want and work at it. Usually about 1 in 4 images I submit gets accepted. I have also been working on boat photography-interior and action. I hope to market that a bit over the next 5 years as I slow down on law practice.

The good thing is all this is portable and now that it is digital, it is cheap. Other than the cost of equipment ( a big cost I admit), all it costs me to shoot is a $50 5gig memory card. On a weekend I spend shooting, I may shoot as many as 1,000 shots.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:16 AM   #25
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Great advice that is....
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:36 PM   #26
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How about diving? Cleaning bottoms that is.
I'd like to get certified and over my fear of diving.I can swim,but just barely.



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I believe the following is a recipe for making money while cruising. It won't work for everyone but it's a model that you can use to create a long-living business on the water and even involving boating.

I've been building companies and products and selling services for my entire career. The moment you step onto your boat and cut the lines the opportunity to "touch" vast numbers of customers reduces - if you need to physically be in contact with them. So businesses onboard and cruising need to find a way to generate a lot of money from the single few prospects or they need to find a way to not have to "touch" the customer. The internet provides the latter solution.

Now I'm not saying that having a service business while cruising is bad. It can easily generate money. But it sure will take a lot of effort because you'll need to make contact with a lot of people to get a few sales. And since the point of cruising is to go out and explore, you're constantly in an environment of explaining what you do individually to other boaters you happen to come into contact with. That's really tough.

If you have a business that is internet-based, you have as much access to the millions of people you'd like to reach as easily as anyone in an office in Manhattan. You'll need internet access and that will limit some cruising areas - it's hard to do a 19 day crossing and run an internet business for example. Still, coastal cruising including the Bahamas and Caribbean is certainly possible. I'm sure PNW cruising will work too although internet might be more spotty.

Here's the easiest model for creating an internet business while cruising:

1. Find something you know a lot about. It's especially appropriate if it's something that cruisers would want - watermakers, chartplotters, anchors, inverters, LED lighting, holding tank vents, hose materials, sealants...it doesn't matter what the subject is.

2. Pick your mountain top and be THE expert in it. Create a web site that is the be-all information source on that one subject. Part of the subject selection process is looking around to make sure you can be THE site.

3. Don't write articles at first for others - write them for your own site. Write lots of them on every aspect of your subject area.

4. Have a place on the web site where you sell the products you talk about. One mistake people make here is to change the articles and information presented on the site based on the products they actually sell. That's a sure way to slit your throat in the short term. Be honest about the products you sell and be 100% truthful about the articles you write - even if it makes a product you sell look less than perfect.

5. Set up relationships with distributors who can drop ship their products directly to the customer. No inventory, no stocking, no return handling, etc. This will reduce your possible profit but a lot of this economic engine is just going to run without you having to touch it. This won't be without hassles. Every business has hassles.


A couple of major, odd things about this that are different from almost every other business and model - something the internet tends to produce:

- Your customer is the person who comes to your site to read your material. That customer might never buy anything from you. It is his needs you have to serve though. If you concentrate only on the people who buy from you, you'll lose the real marketing advantage of attracting large numbers of people. This is a very backwards way of looking at a "store". Most stores hate tire kickers. You have to love them.

- You pretty much have to know web site technologies to make this happen. If you have to pay someone every time you need to make a small change, you're going to eat up all of your profits. Learning html, css, shopping carts, etc. might seem like a lot. There are vast resources and to be honest, it's really not that hard if you have an open mind about it. Think about all of the thousands of web sites you've run across - the people running them aren't all experienced software developers.

- It takes time. It's not going to be like that UPS ad from a few years ago where the website goes public and the counter starts flying with the number of customers served. Any business worth anything doesn't succeed overnight. It takes investment and continuous effort. For most internet businesses like I've described, the investment is your time. Every business requires time or money.


We are full-time cruisers. We've been operating under this model for a few years. We decided in 2006 that the world was going to change from paper guidebooks (that we used and understood very well) to electronic guidebooks. I'm a software developer so our model is slightly different than I described above but it is very similar. Our primary mountain top is that guidebook type of cruising and planning information and the integration and capabilities it can provide. We have a secondary mountain top about mobile phones. See our 18-part article series about using mobile phones on boats - six hundred thousand people have read them. The series was the first ever recipient of a web-based Boat Writers International award. Today magazines come to us looking for information about electronic cruising guides and mobile phones on boats. My point isn't to blow our horn - it's to prove that this marketing technique works with zero budget: (1) be THE expert, and (2) stick with it. Do that and the media (and customers) will come running to you, even if you're on a boat. Heck, especially if you're on a boat - it makes for a better story.

Hummm?I'll have to put some thought and research into that.
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:52 PM   #27
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If you have a home that you are selling to move aboard and it is either paid for or you have substantial equity in it, you can use the proceeds to buy an income property. You then hire a management company to take care of the rental and all you do is receive the checks while cruising.

Others rent their homes but you will make less that way. An example is a home worth 500k will rent for $2300 a month but a 4plex worth 500k will rent for a total of around $3800 monthly. Plus a vacancy in a multi unit will not affect your income as much as it would a single family home.

There you have it. Another way to make money while cruising. And if you add one more property,you might be able afford marina to marina cruising instead of being on the hook all the time.

That plays into part of my long term plan.I have two properties that I will rent out.A local company that handles the payments also has maintenance staff.


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I run a digital interactive software company with employees in the U.S. and abroad. On the boat I have WIFI with an external antenna access/point networked to a local WIFI network for multiple devices. If anybody wants to know how to do this, just ask, it greatly extends the range and signal strength.

During the summer we typically run to the boat Thursday night and stay through Monday. The other days I work out of my home office.

Working from a laptop, even a really good one, doesn't give you the screen real estate you get in an office and that does cost you some productivity. It is also going to give you neck and back cramps after long hours. The other challenge is that marine WIFI is generally "recreational" and is not all that reliable, or fast - if you're used to making video Skype calls, you may have troubles.

In my business we transfer a lot of files, artwork, chunks of code, etc. to do this easily I remote desktop into my office to take advantage of the bandwidth.

That being said, it's a real pleasure to be in a meeting where everyone else is stuck in an office, and you're on the boat. I generally don't tell clients where I am :-)
That's good advice.


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There are many ways to make $$ while cruising as evidenced by the postings. While I practice law & accounting on land, for several years before grad and law school I was a photographer primarily following the PGA tour. I started doing a fair amount of outdoor photography and building inventory with stock photo agencies. That was a lot of years ago when we shot slides and there were many stock agencies. Most are gone and now everything is digital. But the huge stock agencies that remain, notably Getty Images and iStock (now owned by Getty) have literally multiple millions of images on file for sale. They put your images up for sale and pay you a %. Almost all sales now are internet based. So I started again about 7 years ago building up stock. This was looking forward to the day we would be cruising for good. I have built up about 125,000 images in stock now, unfortunately, that is only yielding about $20k per year, but, I keep shooting and building stock. You have to pay attention to what the agencies say they want and work at it. Usually about 1 in 4 images I submit gets accepted. I have also been working on boat photography-interior and action. I hope to market that a bit over the next 5 years as I slow down on law practice.

The good thing is all this is portable and now that it is digital, it is cheap. Other than the cost of equipment ( a big cost I admit), all it costs me to shoot is a $50 5gig memory card. On a weekend I spend shooting, I may shoot as many as 1,000 shots.

Istock,funny that you mention that site.I started my account with them a few months back.I have a quality PS camera and have submitted a few photos just for giggles.They were rejected because 1) I didn't really pay attention to what they wanted. and 2)I really need a quality DSLR camera.I will most definitely keep your post in mind the next I am going out with the camera.Never know what they may except.I will need to make the camera upgrade tho.
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:56 PM   #28
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I'd like to get certified and over my fear of diving.I can swim,but just barely.
You don't actually swim while scuba diving. There are lots of other fears to overcome though.

Had a guy I got partnered with on a dive off Bonaire where he sucked dry a 3000# tank between top and the nearly 100' bottom. Everyone else in the group had only burned through 500# maybe. Scared means hyperventalating which can cause problems. Got to the top, he refused to go to snorkle. Hit the wall, tank absolutely empty means no air at all, about 50' from the docks. Kid panicked big time. Then your training kicks in, yanked at his hugely overloaded weight belt to keep the idiot from sinking. Luckily another dive master was on the docks and dove in to the rescue.

If you're going to go into diving, take the lessons seriously.
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:58 PM   #29
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You don't actually swim while scuba diving. There are lots of other fears to overcome though.

Had a guy I got partnered with on a dive off Bonaire where he sucked dry a 3000# tank between top and the nearly 100' bottom. Everyone else in the group had only burned through 500# maybe. Scared means hyperventalating which can cause problems. Got to the top, he refused to go to snorkle. Hit the wall, tank absolutely empty means no air at all, about 50' from the docks. Kid panicked big time. Then your training kicks in, yanked at his hugely overloaded weight belt to keep the idiot from sinking. Luckily another dive master was on the docks and dove in to the rescue.

If you're going to go into diving, take the lessons seriously.

Oh,I will.Drowning is a fear of mine.I'm sure I can over come that with training and experience.
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Old 09-14-2012, 02:37 PM   #30
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Susan and I have lived aboard and cruised for over 20 years and did a lot of boating prior to that. For more than 15 years we have been freelance writers for most of the major boating publications. Susan's article on ice cream shops along the ICW is in the current issue of Cruising World. We took a specific need and a major topic of discussions amongst boaters and formed Beach House Publications. Our anchorage book series has just gotten off the ground and the response has been incredible. The idea was born aboard and the books are written, edited, promoted, packaged and shipped using our laptop and some office space set aside in the forward cabin of Beach House. With the publication only a couple of weeks old we don't know when space will require more but we'll handle that as time goes by. We already have alternative support for the times we will be away, like our upcoming Bahamas trip. Will we get rich, who knows, but that's not why we do it. It's to share what we have learned from decades of boating and maybe pay for our fuel and a few meals ashore. We don't want to become a big organization and ruin our cruising but we would like to have a little income to keep our lifestyle going for a few more years. So it can be done and it is being done every day. You have to find a need, fill it and find a formula that makes it all work without becoming work. In today's electronic age, "any fool can do it". And if it can be done from your boat, it should be done. Chuck
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Old 09-14-2012, 02:45 PM   #31
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I'm a professional paper shuffler; contracts and pricing. I can, and do, most of my job telecommuting. I only need to go into the office to show the flag and schmooze the troops. I'm wondering if I'll be able to take my gig on the road in the future for another organization. Not everyone is comfortable with this. Even in my own company I see a lot of resistance to the telecommuting concept.

I'm thinking that we're going to have to wait until all the old school geezers retire or die to see this really take off.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:10 PM   #32
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Not everyone is comfortable with this. Even in my own company I see a lot of resistance to the telecommuting concept.

I'm thinking that we're going to have to wait until all the old school geezers retire or die to see this really take off.
Same thing at my employer. At least 50% of the paper shuffling positions here could just as easily be done from home but for the resistant to change culture.

When the old gaurd dies off, and eventually they will, the new team is going to save scads of cash maintaining and renovating office space.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:25 PM   #33
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I'm thinking that we're going to have to wait until all the old school geezers retire or die to see this really take off.
Competition will get 'em first. Take an old school, past prime product or way of producing it, and it won't take long for someone with knowledge about current technologies, efficiencies, and desire to take their lunch, cheese, or whatever metaphor you'd like to use.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:37 PM   #34
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With regards to tele-commuting, and from a moving tele at that, be aware of multi state or multi jurrisdiction tax issues. Most localities and states have sucessfully taken the stand that your employee working "here" allows nexus to attach and the company ends up owing payroll taxes, sales taxes, business licenses, and corporate income taxes to that state, county, city, etc. Like it or not, those are real issues with very real and expensive costs. Insurance companies don't much like it either, because a certain amount of liability attaches as well, and it's always outside the control of the company. So while it sounds cool, it's highly problematic in reality. God only knows what'll happen in foreign waters or ports. Anyone know how to fill out a Canadian or Bahaman tax return?
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Old 09-14-2012, 06:06 PM   #35
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Rambler, Your income is based on the state in which you are paid. So if your telecommuting from the Bahamas and your paycheck goes to Florida because that's where your address is, then it's based on Florida taxes, which there is no state income taxes. Our home base is Sarasota and that is the business address. So sales to Florida residents are taxed but sales to other states are not. In most but not all cases these issues are determined by the locations of the business either physical or business address and the address or residence of the employees. Chuck
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:19 PM   #36
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Here is a list of courses that the college offers that I can get retraining in.There's 3 pages.
Programs & Degrees | Spartanburg Community College

I already have a cert in industrial mechanics,auto mechanics,and of all things,bicycle mechanics.All are about 20+ years out of date.
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Old 09-17-2012, 08:36 AM   #37
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Rambler, Your income is based on the state in which you are paid.

In most but not all cases these issues are determined by the locations of the business either physical or business address and the address or residence of the employees. Chuck
I can't agree with that at all. Nexus laws attach based on where you perform the work, not the address on the stationary or where you bank. Trust me, or not if you like. This is what I do for a living.

So a transient, working on their boat, in Maryland waters, would owe Maryland taxes on the pro-rata share of income earned while in that state. And Maryland will extract their pound of taxes, California too, and every other state in which someone earns income.

Now, the realities are that the state may never know about the earnings generated by a transient boater, but, they do know about the athletes and entertainers, truckers, and many others that conduct business within their state. Ohio is dastardly about extracting their pound of taxes from all manner of businesses.

International is the same. Do business there, they want their taxes on your income generated in their country.

From where I sit, from my experiences and the experiences of my clients, it's not an issue to be slack about. Work from your boat if that's what you want to do, but be aware of the tax and legal issues that go with that activity. Talk to your legal advisor, your tax advisor and your insurance agent.
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Old 09-19-2012, 05:42 AM   #38
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IF you can work "out" of the USA for 18 months , there are huge tax advantages!!!
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Old 09-19-2012, 08:46 AM   #39
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IF you can work "out" of the USA for 18 months , there are huge tax advantages!!!
I don't know how that would work out.I have two kids.One doesn't live with me.

I could do the ebay thing,again.It's hard since they jacked up the fees and paypal has jacked their fees too.I'd be port hopping so there shouldn't be any issue with shipping or coming across deals from time to time.I may have to diversify.
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