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Old 02-24-2013, 06:55 AM   #21
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When my girlfriend found out I owned a 50 year old wooden boat, she immediately began to wonder what else was wrong with me... Some really good advice about insurance and finding marinas that will accept liveaboards. More difficult than it sounds. Would you be able to keep the boat where she lies now? Does the bilge pump cycle while you are aboard? I note that the FL 120 has a new (unpainted - just manufacturer primer..) exhaust elbow - could be just a bad gasket or loosened bolts creating an exhaust leak. Lots to think about... how is the genset? Your surveyor will check all, I suppose... Best of luck - the oldies can be goodies but constant work.
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:20 AM   #22
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Greetings,
Mr. BR. If I may be so bold, I would suggest a few or 5 or 6 or more evenings of introspection while watching the sunset before doing ANYTHING regarding a purchase save looking at more boats. I would have MY personal preference but I am not going to suggest any particular vessel. Make a list, look at many more boats and be calm. We wouldn't want this...

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Old 02-24-2013, 07:43 AM   #23
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Hi, The Woodie is nice but I think you should get a glass boat. Your life will be easier and you will have more time to enjoy the sunsets. A 32 GB could be to small as a full time liveaboard. They are a lot like our 32 IG and for living aboard I think you need more storage space. The 36GB with and aft cabin probably works better.
The forward cabin could be a store room and the aft your sleeping quarters.
View Boat Photos - YachtWorld.com In the current market you might get this one for the price of the Carver.

My 2cents JohnP
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Old 02-24-2013, 10:35 AM   #24
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Hi, The Woodie is nice but I think you should get a glass boat. Your life will be easier and you will have more time to enjoy the sunsets. A 32 GB could be to small as a full time liveaboard. They are a lot like our 32 IG and for living aboard I think you need more storage space. The 36GB with and aft cabin probably works better.
The forward cabin could be a store room and the aft your sleeping quarters.
View Boat Photos - YachtWorld.com In the current market you might get this one for the price of the Carver.

My 2cents JohnP
That boat is beautiful. it's a stretch and it means I have to put my live aboard dreams on hold until I sell the cuddy. that's probably smart anyway.

a couple of logistics questions because that's a lot of boat. My seamanship experience is all a 21.5' I/o single engine cuddy on a plane. should I hire a captain to get something like that moved? how much would that cost? is a single 4 or 5 day trip w a captain enough training to handle her? since I would probably not want to make a lot of trips back and forth, is there a common way to get her surveyed before my offer? I mean this boat is what I want mixed w the advice I'm getting on forums and talking to people. she's definitely a stretch all the way around for me, but probably exactly what I should be stretching for. my only grumble, probably becaue I've never had one is that I miss the teak.
thanks very much for this recommendation.
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Old 02-24-2013, 11:09 AM   #25
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A 32 GB could be too small as a full time liveaboard. The 36GB with and aft cabin probably works better.
I could not agree more! I also have a 32 and there's no way I could ever live on it. A few days, maybe ...even a week! Think astronaut in an Apollo capsule.
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Old 02-24-2013, 11:17 AM   #26
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I could not agree more! I also have a 32 and there's no way I could ever live on it. A few days, maybe ...even a week! Think astronaut in an Apollo capsule.
please remember this started w me in a cuddy cabin for a month.
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Old 02-24-2013, 11:47 AM   #27
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please remember this started w me in a cuddy cabin for a month.
Ralph: You started this thread with "please talk me down and give me very candid advice." That's exactly what we're trying to do. I'll leave you with 2 photos of a young man on my dock who moved aboard a 32 foot boat as a live aboard.

At the time of moving aboard & after 3 months.
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Old 02-24-2013, 12:02 PM   #28
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C'mon. no fair. Monkey trumps everything. ao can't argue with a monkey.

thanks. I'm going to clean up my engine today and text my broker I want to lower the price on my cuddy. It ought to move quickly. Then I can take a little flight up north and look at that sweet 77 36'.
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Old 02-24-2013, 12:10 PM   #29
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C'mon. no fair. Monkey trumps everything. ao can't argue with a monkey.
.
It's actually a troll but you get the picture. Best of luck in your new endeavor!
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Old 02-24-2013, 12:29 PM   #30
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Ralph--- We went from a 17' Arima fishing boat, which we still have, to the 36' GB. Granted we had a lot of experience running a 60 foot, 20 ton narrowboat in the UK, although driving a boat down a ditch is a lot different than running a boat through the maze of islands, channels, high currents, fog, etc of the PNW.

But our narrowboat experience got us used to long, heavy boats with lots of inertia and how to maneuver them. We had also chartered a GB36 (single engine) prior to buying our own (twin engine) GB, so we had a basic understanding of the vessel. And as a result of years and years of flying floatplanes in the Puget Sound area and up through BC and SE Alaska we were very familiar with the geography and the weather.

So other than learning the details of the operation, care and feeding of our GB, and of course the never-ending learning process of dealing with all the variables the water and weather can throw at you, our move into this kind of boating was pretty seamless.

We learned twin-engine handling on our own, which because we found it totally intuitive from day one presented no challenge at all as far as how to make the boat move the way we want it to. Making it move the way we want it to in the face of current, wind, and new-to-us docking situations is another story.. But at least we don't need to consciously think about how to manipulate the controls to make the boat move the way we want-- that became automatic years ago.

If you are concerned about learning to handle a boat the size you are contemplating I suggest you consider a charter or two. The charter companies offer instruction and if they (or you) determine you are not ready to take a boat out on your own many offer the option of taking an experienced skipper along. A charter will also help you determine if this kind of boat is even what you really want.

Below is our boat experience progression. If we can do it, you can too.

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Old 02-24-2013, 12:53 PM   #31
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While you're looking check out Daddyo's site, Grace Yatching, and look at the 42' Carver. I know the guy that owns it and I know its turn key. Maybe a little more money but you never know what happens. The boat is in Hopewell Va about hour and a half from you.Larry
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:10 PM   #32
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Just looked myself. Listing must have expired but if interested in a 42' carver motoryatch with twin cummins let me know. I can arrange a viewing.Larry
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Old 02-24-2013, 06:27 PM   #33
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I suspect taking on an old woodie will be a huge burden you don`t need.
Something newer and fibreglass will be quite enough to maintain.
I would discount the Carver because of the gas engines, but that`s just me. Others love them,they scare me.
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Old 02-24-2013, 07:40 PM   #34
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Well, the romance is all gone. I went back today w/o broker and no appointment. Yeah, it's too much for me. I decided to spend a little time and give the Trojan 32' sedan a second look. After all this, it doesn't look that bad. (god that's how I wanna describe my next home and boat. ) Anyway, gonna go w broker tomorrow and check it out. Tonignt my friends guiness and blue moon are hanging witj me on my cuddy enjoying beautiful weather and a full moon.

I wanna stay on the water. I really like the trawlers. We'll see where I land.

tha ks to everyone for the help.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:08 PM   #35
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Well, the romance is all gone. Yeah, it's too much for me. I wanna stay on the water. I really like the trawlers. We'll see where I land.
Whew! I hope you know that you really dodged a bullet!
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:29 PM   #36
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Strongly consider the size of your work shop before buying. It is very uncomfortable to store all your tools in your living space. In my opinion no work shop equals no project boat I have done booth ways. I work part time for a company that has water front shops for that reason.
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:56 AM   #37
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For a liveaboard there are a few things that if a boat has makes it much more comfortable. A transom door doesn't sound like a big deal. But when trying to load groceries, laundry or a dog a transom door becomes a very option. Larger tankage, water & holding means less trips to the pump out. Filling & using water from the onboard tank keeps it fresh so when anchored out there is a supply of fresh clean water. A bigger boat will have a larger fridge, this makes for fewer trips to the market, I've had both & size does matter. Also a decent amount of counter space makes preparing a meal much easier. A water heater large enough for a decent shower, 11 gallon on last 2 boats seem to work well, even when giving 3 grandkids baths. A berth configuration that seems to me best for liveaboard is a centerline queen, much easier to make up the bed when you can get around both sides. Had a mid berth & it's a pia to change sheets & blanket when your on the bed.
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Old 03-13-2013, 05:29 PM   #38
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For a liveaboard there are a few things that if a boat has makes it much more comfortable. A transom door doesn't sound like a big deal. But when trying to load groceries, laundry or a dog a transom door becomes a very option. Larger tankage, water & holding means less trips to the pump out. Filling & using water from the onboard tank keeps it fresh so when anchored out there is a supply of fresh clean water. A bigger boat will have a larger fridge, this makes for fewer trips to the market, I've had both & size does matter. Also a decent amount of counter space makes preparing a meal much easier. A water heater large enough for a decent shower, 11 gallon on last 2 boats seem to work well, even when giving 3 grandkids baths. A berth configuration that seems to me best for liveaboard is a centerline queen, much easier to make up the bed when you can get around both sides. Had a mid berth & it's a pia to change sheets & blanket when your on the bed.
And remember, you will not always want to be sleeping alone.

Marty..........................
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