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Old 12-17-2012, 07:16 PM   #121
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"at least new tanks"

PROPERLY designed, installed and maintained tanks should not require replacement

EVER!
What kind of maintenance is recommended for SS diesel fuel tanks?
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Old 12-17-2012, 08:54 PM   #122
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Is this the boat?

1999 Hyatt Voyager 50 Trawler Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

If so, very nice looking boat!
Photo 29 has an interesting shaft packing modification.
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Old 12-17-2012, 08:56 PM   #123
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Actually, I'm not all that impressed with it. I feel the topsides are out of proportion to the hull (topsides too tall, hull too squat) and those oversize pilothouse windows gave the boat a Walt Disney cartoon look. The bow is too raked for the style of the boat.
Agree.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:30 PM   #124
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What kind of maintenance is recommended for SS diesel fuel tanks?
Bob--- The five new tanks the PO had fabricated for our boat to replace the boat's three original iron tanks are stainless. When we had the boat surveyed these tanks were only a year old. The surveyor said that stainless tanks are not approved by the ABYC (this was in 1998). The reason he gave is that there is stainless and there is stainless. Even with the same alloy number the quality can vary greatly.

The same thing is true of the welds. Heating stainless in welding changes the steel's properties to the point where its "stainless" attributes can be reduced or go away entirely. So the quality of the welds is critical to the integrity and longevity of a stainless tank. Poor welds can lead to crevice corrosion and pin holing when the metal is deprived of oxygen as they are when the tanks sit full of fuel.

Because of all the variables possible with a stainless tank, the ABYC did not consider it an "approved" material for fuel tanks. I have heard this ruling has since been changed but I don't know for sure so don't assume I've heard right.

The surveyor said that as long as we moved fuel though the tanks regularly and the welds were exposed to oxygen periodically this would help hold weld problems at bay (if there were going to be weld problems).

He also said that while stainless was not a good choice for fuel tanks he was familiar with boats in the SFO Bay area that had had stainless tanks installed many, manay years earlier and were so far doing just fine. So it all depends on the quality of the metal and the welds.

So this plus not wanting to have fuel sit on the boat very long anyway prompted us to develop the fuel management procedure we have used since acquiring the boat.

All our tanks gravity feed from their lowest points so there is really no maintenance necessary to the tanks as nothing stays in a tank when it's emptied. We've never gotten any water or dirt in the bowls of the Racor filters the fuel runs through on the way to the engines. The tanks were made with large inspection ports but we have had no reason to remove them.

So maintenance-wise, I dunno. You can polish them if you like, I guess. We use bug killer and a fuel conditioner in our fuel, for what that's worth although neither one has any effect, good, bad, or indifferent, on the tanks themselves.

If someone was contemplating new tanks for a boat I would not recommend stainless for the reasons stated by the surveyor (at this point I'm assuming that what he told us is correct). If we had to re-tank our boat, or if someone asked us what to use for new tanks, I would recommend what Grand Banks themselves are now using for fuel tanks, which is composite.

Although an iron tank if properly made, protected, and installed can last a hell of a long time.
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:49 PM   #125
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Photo 29 has an interesting shaft packing modification.
#28 looks like it is some kind of shield to keep any water from slinging all over the compartment. Seems like a pretty good idea. The engines are spotless. Not a smear or drip. The rocker covers shine. The through hull needs tidying up a bit the patina is a little green.

Kinda hard to find fault in an engine compartment that looks like that. Like the boat or not.
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Old 12-18-2012, 03:18 AM   #126
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Hey all, I acquired 2 x 500ltr tanks from a Scania Road-train (really long truck). They are made from alloy. Seeing as boats are made from alloy this material shouldn't pose a problem should it? I plan on using one for diesel and the other for water.

I've heard of some people's opinions are that alloy in not good in a marine environment but I'm confused as boats are made from alloy?

Thoughts on this please :-)

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Old 12-18-2012, 03:31 AM   #127
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Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Is this the boat?

1999 Hyatt Voyager 50 Trawler Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

If so, very nice looking boat!
OMG...I'm in love at first sight. What a beauty, and I can't believe the price. Here in Oz that would be 1/2 a million...
I might move to the US, after selling my house, take a Sarca with me, and...and... nah...Pete, you're dreamin'...they'd never let you in....
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Old 12-18-2012, 11:27 AM   #128
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If someone was contemplating new tanks for a boat I would not recommend stainless
Sound advice. Stainless is much more prone to embrittalment from oxygen deprivation and due to the high content of chromium and nickel, the metal fatigues much more quickly than a softer iron.

Aluminum tanks work well in dry bilges. Steel would be a close second choice in my opinion.

All that being said, I have two 150 gallon stainless water tanks that haven't leaked a drop in 33 years.
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Old 12-18-2012, 01:23 PM   #129
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Hendo78,
Wise to be suspect in this matter. I'm no expert on metallurgy but from both my ultralight flying and building days and the boating thing since 1950 I can give you something to consider.

Most commonly there's 5000 series, 7000series, 6000 series and 2000 series aluminum alloy.

Most boats are made of 5000 series and are obviously very resistant to corrosion and fairly strong.

Airplanes are made of stronger stuff most likely 7000 series but could be 6000 for some things.

2000 series is very strong but corrodes very fast. 7000 is strong and hard as well. I've wasted many drill bits on 7000 alloy.

Most 5000 and 6000 series stuff commonly available will probably be good for a boat tank. Others here will probably know more.

As to your tank the problem will probably be not knowing what alloy the tank was made of. When the plate was raw material there will likely be faint blue numbers like 2024, 6061, 7075 or 5052 ect. Lacking that info you may be able to trace back who made the tank and find out from the source. Lacking that you may be able to draw some conclusions from the life the tank has led. Exposed metal, 20 yrs old, chipped off paint showing bare metal that is or isn't corroded ect.

Good luck and let us know.
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Old 12-19-2012, 01:08 AM   #130
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Hendo78,
Wise to be suspect in this matter. I'm no expert on metallurgy but from both my ultralight flying and building days and the boating thing since 1950 I can give you something to consider.

Most commonly there's 5000 series, 7000series, 6000 series and 2000 series aluminum alloy.

Most boats are made of 5000 series and are obviously very resistant to corrosion and fairly strong.

Airplanes are made of stronger stuff most likely 7000 series but could be 6000 for some things.

2000 series is very strong but corrodes very fast. 7000 is strong and hard as well. I've wasted many drill bits on 7000 alloy.

Most 5000 and 6000 series stuff commonly available will probably be good for a boat tank. Others here will probably know more.

As to your tank the problem will probably be not knowing what alloy the tank was made of. When the plate was raw material there will likely be faint blue numbers like 2024, 6061, 7075 or 5052 ect. Lacking that info you may be able to trace back who made the tank and find out from the source. Lacking that you may be able to draw some conclusions from the life the tank has led. Exposed metal, 20 yrs old, chipped off paint showing bare metal that is or isn't corroded ect.

Good luck and let us know.
Hi Eric.
Yeah wouldn't have a clue about alloy grade for this tank. The tank came off a 12month year old truck. I rang Scania but they get the tanks made externally and were not forthcoming with whom that external company is.

From what I have learnt from other forums the issues some people are having with alloy tanks come down to two points. First being a wet bilge and second being not having sealed batteries. These two don't pose any risk to me so I should be right IMHO.

I've spoken to the manufacturers of the 100% solids epoxy (Bote-Cote) I am using on my ply sheets and ribs and they said I can coat the tank in the same epoxy without any dramas If I really wanted to but would be too concerned with the tank due to its age, the batteries I have and the fact I will be making the boat water tight.
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Old 12-19-2012, 02:02 AM   #131
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All that being said, I have two 150 gallon stainless water tanks that haven't leaked a drop in 33 years.
Same here, SomeSailor. In our case our two stainless water tanks (85 gal each) are now 40 years old. Go figure.
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Old 12-19-2012, 11:30 AM   #132
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I had a 35 yr old Albin w a SS fuel tank. It was the original and nary a problem.

But my Albin was Swedish built = well built and I didn't have 95% of the other problems talked about on other boats either. That Albin was the most well built trouble free boat I've ever known bigger than a canoe. The caprail/rubrail was some kind of rubberized plastic (blue). I''ve seen about 50 little Albin's in/at the Albineers of BC club and NEVER saw anything wrong w the blur rails. So if the fuel tank was built to the same standards ........................

Why is this thread in the livaboard section?
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Old 12-22-2012, 10:55 AM   #133
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classic old MT 34
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Old 12-22-2012, 11:02 AM   #134
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Motion30,

Yea I like doze boats. Did you just feel like post'in that pic or does this post have somth'in to do w someth'in?
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Old 12-22-2012, 01:35 PM   #135
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classic old MT 34

Looks awfully familiar!
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Old 12-22-2012, 10:42 PM   #136
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Ditto Darrell, that's my boat minus the canopy and side deck extensions.
The thread was called "What to look for in a Trawler, Eric, although you could be forgiven for missing that with the usual thread drift that occurs. In this case I think the attraction to look for being illustrated is the nice rear cockpit space of a sedan...?
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Old 12-23-2012, 12:39 AM   #137
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The thread was called "What to look for in a Trawler, Eric... In this case I think the attraction to look for being illustrated is the nice rear cockpit space of a sedan...?
An important feature in my opinion. Non sundeck aft cabin boats, and even some sedan styles like Blue Seas, don`t have enough room aft to swing a cat(apologies to all ship`s cats, time they had their own thread) or for chairs, table, and a comfortable drink or meal. Sure many boats have a flybridge, but getting urgent supplies from the fridge and galley are less easy. And if the cockpit is well covered all the better, in these days of sun exposure worries.
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Old 12-23-2012, 08:15 AM   #138
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We didn't write things down but we did have a mental list of what we would be COMFORTABLE with. Number one on the list was to keep it as small as possible, and still be comfortable. With this comes a usually smaller initial investment, ease of operation, lower maintenance costs, lower operating costs, etc., all of which add to the idea of "comfortable". If a boat gives you comfort in EVERY, or at least, most areas, you can't help but love it!

Things we like about ours;
- No fly-bridge, cuts down on redundant systems, easier to handle with less wind problems, no climbing
- Port, starboard, and cockpit doors
- Single diesel
- Wrap-around deck/walkways
- Self draining cockpit
- Transom door to walk through to swim deck
- 4 burner stove top and oven for the head chef and mate!
- It is in good operating condition but needs work as I choose.
- It has a classic, salty look.
- If it burns up tomorrow, we won't like it but it won't hurt us financially
so we only have liability insurance at $100/yr.
- Etc.
- Etc.
- Etc.

These are personal preferences of the wife and I.
Find your comfort level in ALL aspects and only then can you really enjoy it.

Good luck-
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Old 09-04-2013, 10:16 PM   #139
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We cruised on a 37' full displacement trawler for many years between Lake Superior, the gulf and Bahamas. Along came the grandkids who spend a lot of time with us so we got a 42' boat so they could have their own room.

We found that the extra 5' locked us out of many of the small anchorages on the icw and many of the free docks. Go with the smallest boat you can be comfortable with.

I think this is pertinent as the OP mentioned Florida and the Bahamas.
Was it the extra length that was the primary problem, ....or the extra draft associated with the longer vessel??
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Old 09-04-2013, 10:26 PM   #140
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Was it the extra length that was the primary problem, ....or the extra draft associated with the longer vessel??
Length was the problem, both had same draft and beam.
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