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Old 12-22-2014, 01:25 PM   #1
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Still taking your boat out?

Hi,

I am new to the forum and a prospective live aboard. I have questions for those of you who already live aboard. How often do you take your boat out and do you still like taking extended vacations aboard? I know that part of going out on my boat (currently a sailboat) is the "getting away" aspect. When you are taking your home with you does it still feel that way?

I'm concerned that after some time of living aboard the novelty of going out for the weekend will wear off and that I will stay at the dock for months on end.

I'm sure much of it has to do with personality and lifestyle choices. I'm curious to hear from those of you who have done this.

Thanks

Richard
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Old 12-22-2014, 03:05 PM   #2
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Welcome to the forum Richard! Can't help you with your question as I still live on dirt most of the time.

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Old 12-22-2014, 03:11 PM   #3
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Not exactly what your looking for we live on ours just short of 6 months out of the year and have not been doing that long

but each time we have a long list of trips to take and really look forward to it
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:27 PM   #4
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Welcome to the forum Richard! Can't help you with your question as I still live on dirt most of the time.

Ted
Ted,

Thanks for the nice welcome. I plan to be dirt free by the end of the summer. Still need to find the right boat. Working on that one. We will see!

Richard
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:29 PM   #5
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Not exactly what your looking for we live on ours just short of 6 months out of the year and have not been doing that long

but each time we have a long list of trips to take and really look forward to it
That's good to hear. I'm wondering if "familiarity breeds contempt" when it comes to living aboard full time. Will the novelty wear off and the trips out tail off too? I don't want my boat to become a "dockominium".

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Old 12-22-2014, 10:25 PM   #6
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Still taking your boat out?

Welcome to the forum!



We live on dirt and take the boat on planned trips; many along with members of this forum. We keep our boat in Vallejo. About 10% of the folks live on their boats at our marina. I have noticed that very few liveaboards, if any, take their boats out of their slips. I can't think of anyone, actually.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:26 PM   #7
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You know, I thought a lot about that very question when we the boat began to languish at our dock. After a year or so of owning the boat, it became clear that it served us well in some aspects and not at all in others. We like to do sunset dinner cruises and it great for that. But we also like to swim off the boat, you know, like throw the anchor out in a nearby cove or off a sandbar, and the boat wasn't outfitted for it. Our transom had a fold down tailgate but the ladder was hard on the feet and the bulwarks were high for side entry, so we ended up not using the boat for things we would have liked to. Now, I've added a swim platform, modified the transom tailgate to swing inward, and I'm looking for the right ladder that will make it all very easy. My guess is that adding these features to the boat will triple our usage of the boat for those local jaunts. The moral is, if you're going to spend money for a boat, make sure it will facilitate the ease of enjoying the water in the activities you love. If it's a pain to do it, you won't.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:39 PM   #8
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I don't think it is a matter of "familiarity breeds contempt". The biggest issue really is....do you take your boat out in the first place???? And you cannot answer that question because you do not own one right now. The vast majority of boats you see in marinas do NOT go out. It is because people had this image of what it is like to own a boat(live on a boat). And reality and that image were too far apart. I will say the boat I lived on for 5 years....I had it for 2 years before I moved onto it. I used the hell out of it in that two years and I continued to use the hell out of it when I lived aboard.

With that said, most liveaboards do not take their boats out very often. One begins to start trying to make their boat home much like the dirt home that they left....and you end up with crap EVERYWHERE. Crap everywhere is not very conducive to taking your boat out. Then getting the boat ready to go out requires that you stow and secure said crap and then it just becomes too much of a hassle and you do take your boat out. If you can limit your crap and keep your boat in a state of "semi-readiness", it would serve you well.

So those are two issues. Will you take your boat out a lot in the first place regardless of being a liveaboard. And will your boat be overcome with crap to the point that it is a PIA to take out.

I will be dead honest with you. I think I took my boat out more when I was a liveaboard. But I do not think that is normal. It is awfully nice to not have to go spend $200 at the grocery store and haul wheelbarrows full of crap down to the boat just to do one measly little overnight. You are already stocked up on food. You already have all of your "crap" with you. You just hit the store to fill in the gaps of food and untie and GO! I loved it!!!
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Old 12-22-2014, 11:02 PM   #9
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Welcome to the forum!



We live on dirt and take the boat on planned trips; many along with members of this forum. We keep our boat in Vallejo. About 10% of the folks live on their boats at our marina. I have noticed that very few liveaboards, if any, take their boats out of their slips. I can't think of anyone, actually.
Yes - that's what I've heard too. I want to buck that trend. I looked at a GB46 - made an offer even - but it didn't work out and I've moved on. Still trying to find the right one for me.

Richard
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Old 12-22-2014, 11:05 PM   #10
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You know, I thought a lot about that very question when we the boat began to languish at our dock. After a year or so of owning the boat, it became clear that it served us well in some aspects and not at all in others. We like to do sunset dinner cruises and it great for that. But we also like to swim off the boat, you know, like throw the anchor out in a nearby cove or off a sandbar, and the boat wasn't outfitted for it. Our transom had a fold down tailgate but the ladder was hard on the feet and the bulwarks were high for side entry, so we ended up not using the boat for things we would have liked to. Now, I've added a swim platform, modified the transom tailgate to swing inward, and I'm looking for the right ladder that will make it all very easy. My guess is that adding these features to the boat will triple our usage of the boat for those local jaunts. The moral is, if you're going to spend money for a boat, make sure it will facilitate the ease of enjoying the water in the activities you love. If it's a pain to do it, you won't.
That's a good point. It's an interesting tradeoff of livability vs. taking trips. Unless I go to the Sacramento Delta, I don't go swimming off my boat! I have to have something that is a competent coastal cruiser since that's one of the things I like to do. That will mean less live aboard space than some other power boats.

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Old 12-22-2014, 11:12 PM   #11
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Baker,

Very good points - the "crap everywhere" comment is one I have heard before. The truth is that when I go to the boat (Catalina 36) I always go out - I almost never spend a night at the dock. Recently, with family changes, I haven't been there as much. But in the fall when my younger daughter goes to college I will be on my own. That's when I plan to move aboard a trawler yet to be purchased. I hope to go out a lot. We will see...

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Old 12-22-2014, 11:16 PM   #12
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Welcome to the forum Richard! Can't help you with your question as I still live on dirt most of the time.

Ted
By the way - love the Cherubini - it's been on my list of possible trawlers. Not many on the market though.

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Old 12-23-2014, 12:23 AM   #13
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When we started to live aboard we had the same concern. Our solution was to refuse a dockside pumpout service. We would force ourselves to move the boat when we needed a pumpout.

This way we ran the boat at least every two weeks, checked out our systems, practiced docking and usually decided to take a longer spin while we were away from the slip. It worked for us.
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Old 12-23-2014, 05:41 AM   #14
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We have lived aboard four to six months a year for years almost always at anchor, and still enjoy moving the boat to another anchorage/island/country depending upon what we feel like doing.

Find no excitement in the ride, in fact preferred to be bored, but moving our "home" to a new location is exciting.
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Old 12-23-2014, 06:29 AM   #15
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The biggest part of the equation is why you liveaboard and what kind of boat you have.

If you moved aboard to cruise...you already had in mind where to stow EVERYTHING and that is necessary...so getting g underway isn't painful.

If your liveaboard is a sportfish, chances are it is that because you had this idea of using it to fish....so getting underway is a bit of a priority.

There is no pay answer....just the ones that I personally have or have seen with other liveaboards.
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Old 12-23-2014, 07:30 AM   #16
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By the way - love the Cherubini - it's been on my list of possible trawlers. Not many on the market though.

Richard
Yes, I like mine very much. They were built in New Jersey, and I can't recall seeing one for sale on the West Coast.

Ted
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:03 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
I don't think it is a matter of "familiarity breeds contempt". The biggest issue really is....do you take your boat out in the first place???? And you cannot answer that question because you do not own one right now. The vast majority of boats you see in marinas do NOT go out. It is because people had this image of what it is like to own a boat(live on a boat). And reality and that image were too far apart. I will say the boat I lived on for 5 years....I had it for 2 years before I moved onto it.
Very well put

on my dock we have 4 live aboards all take there boat out very often. The next dock over mainly big boys I never see them go out. One of them has a 28 foot tender that he takes out daily.
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:40 AM   #18
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As a new live-aboard, since June, I plan on taking my boat out more than I did when I wasn't living aboard. I understand the clutter issue but I've maintained a level of semi-readiness to get underway. I turned the 3rd stateroom into a walk-in closet and the only real clutter I have is in the galley and that is all my spices that I cook with. Other than that I find that I do more maintance on board due to being there 24/7. Everything is subjective. What one considers going out a lot compared to another varies greatly.
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Old 12-23-2014, 10:14 AM   #19
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As a new live-aboard, since June, I plan on taking my boat out more than I did when I wasn't living aboard. I understand the clutter issue but I've maintained a level of semi-readiness to get underway. I turned the 3rd stateroom into a walk-in closet and the only real clutter I have is in the galley and that is all my spices that I cook with. Other than that I find that I do more maintance on board due to being there 24/7. Everything is subjective. What one considers going out a lot compared to another varies greatly.
Hello Knotheadcharters.

For those of us who cook spice jar storage is a point of concern. I look at other galleys of course, and always check for spices, and what the ladies have done with theirs.

On Moonlight Sue (a 40' Hunter) the wife has hers in clips on a bulkhead. She said none have fallen. I don't like dusting so that wouldn't work well for me.

One place online had a spice rack that bolted under the upper lockers (for a RV) but it didn't look like it would fit enough spices for me. The case was beautiful though.

It was essentially a wooden box with the hinged lid bolted to the locker. You unsnapped the latch to access the spices -- it would be quite nice for knives...

Onboard Seaweed mine are kept in a locker under the sink (next to the stove)

Pictures:


and


The most used are of course at the top. I made another spice shelf and the how-to is in this article:
Janice142 article Budget Spice Shelf (costs less than $1)

Good luck.

You're right though: Being prepared to leave means it's far more likely that you will do so. I've been reading, decided I wanted to go and left -- in less than 15 minutes *without* rushing.

It's easy and if I can do it, so too can you.
P.S. - Museum Putty is your friend.

And so too is keeping things put away. In a 23' boat that's a given. I like tidy.

Even though it's Christmas and the tree is out, the base is taped to the dinette table. Even if rocked, that tree is not going any place.

Little things like that make all the difference in the world, and after this many years afloat it's second nature to consider what would happen when the boat moves.

All of us that have been out any length of time start to think that way. I find myself, when visiting dirt dwellers moving items from the edge of a counter. Of course the house won't rock, but 'cha never know.
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Old 12-23-2014, 10:20 AM   #20
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We live and work aboard essentially 24/7. During the summer, we are out cruising/working. We "winter" in a slip. Like Rsysol, we fire her up every 12-14 days and move over to the fuel dock to pump out. Other than that and a few trips to the islands or Seattle, we would like to get out more during the winter months.

We just installed a Wallas forced air diesel heater, so that has us now ready to go no matter how cold it gets. We'll still avoid winter storms and such, but plan on getting away more often.

As far as all the live aboard "stuff" one typically accumulates, it is a challenge to try and balance a comfortable daily lifestyle with a state of semi-readiness for departure and full on "rigged for sea" mode. My wife has glassware and "collectibles" all over, but it still only takes about 15 minutes to stow everything for a trip. 20 minutes if we make things extra secure (depending on the forecast).

I think that if you WANT to take your live aboard boat out often, you will. It's simply a matter of deciding that is your specific live aboard lifestyle...
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