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Old 08-28-2012, 12:39 AM   #1
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Soon to be a liveaboard - advice?

Hi All,

We have sold our house and in March next year we will become livebaoards on our Fleming 55.

Although we are both excited, we are also somewhat nervous. We'd be gratful for any advice you may have.

One immediate question before we start is 'do we get rid of everything in the house rather than put it into storage?'

Thank you - in excited anticipation - Piers and Lin
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Old 08-28-2012, 02:14 AM   #2
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Sell it all! You will need the
Money for fuel! Cause when your not at work you will be out adventuring i sold all
My stuff... 65 inch tv to a 19/dvd/computer monitor 38 chevy to a 51 harley, and 2 closets of clothes to 4 drawers and a closet smaller than porsche 911 back seat.
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Old 08-28-2012, 02:15 AM   #3
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And all the other oversized furniture lol! Its a lifestyle is the only thing that makes sense of
It.
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Old 08-28-2012, 07:45 AM   #4
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Get rid of it all but the irreplaceable items, pictures and special nick/knacks, etc. A storage locker is going to cost you what, $500 to $1,500/year or more? Ask your self, what is really near and dear to you? We left 6 or 7 boxes of "stuff" for 7 years. When we opened them up we laughed so hard we cried.
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Old 08-28-2012, 08:39 AM   #5
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Yes. Paying to store a washer/dryer/refrigerator/furniture for a few years will cost more than to buy new stuff when you need it again. Photos and familiy stuff, sure. Make sure you get a climate controlled storage space or you'll come back to mold and mildew. Mine is near the boat and acts more like a garage to stow stuff.
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Old 08-28-2012, 09:45 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by greatpapabear View Post
Hi All,

We have sold our house and in March next year we will become livebaoards on our Fleming 55.

Although we are both excited, we are also somewhat nervous. We'd be gratful for any advice you may have.

One immediate question before we start is 'do we get rid of everything in the house rather than put it into storage?'

Thank you - in excited anticipation - Piers and Lin
Sell....the whole concept of cruisin" is that all that stuff is just that stuff...and when and if you are done with living aboard...you will probably never want to go back to that sort of "stuff".

The hardest part is getting rid of valuable but unwanted stuff and deciding how to do it, storing heirloom type stuff that ain't comin' aboard, and what to do with the real personal stuff like photo albums that are really better digitized for living aboard.

I'm on my 3rd liveaboard, always an adventure.
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:19 AM   #7
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This is all SO encouraging. As you all say, it's an adventure! We are already musing about where to go after the summer months are done and we need somewhere warmer for winter (2013).

OK, so we look to sell/dump everything that's not valuabe as far as heirlooms are concerned, we have thousands of pics going back generations (including some 4" square negatives on glass slides of the family taken in the 1800s) so getting them digitised will be bit of a palaver (maybe we'll ask (bribe?) one of our boys to do it for us).

After you'd made the jump to the boat, was there anything you thought you wished you'd taken with you?
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:20 AM   #8
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A bigger boat! Lol.
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Old 08-28-2012, 10:56 AM   #9
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...After you'd made the jump to the boat, was there anything you thought you wished you'd taken with you?
Other than a few more tools, nothing is missed. We have a rule, not always followed successfully though, if it hasn't been used in a year, off the boat it goes.

We do have wedding/funeral clothes back in the states with a relative.
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Old 08-28-2012, 11:01 AM   #10
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Rubbermaid containers for all of your valuables. There will be some things you wont want and some you will. We are in the process of moving aboard and houe is on the market. One thing we are doing is going through a YES NO MAYBE list, If it hasnt been touched in 6 months or longer it is outta here.. keep photo albums, sentimental stuff etc.. but agree on selling all the applainces and furniture and stuff Why keep it? As Psneeld stated you wont want it when youre done with cruising anyways.
GOOD LUCK! Remember it is all just STUFF!

Be ready for the crazy comments people will have when they hear your story..
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Old 08-28-2012, 11:06 AM   #11
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It would help if we knew the area/location you plan on being a live aboard and a little more about past/present life/boating and what your expectations about being a live aboard are?

I would shed only the dirt stuff that can be easily replaced, until you get through at least one winter. Many loving compatible couples living in a larger dirt dwelling are not as loving/compatible in a smaller boat with limited resources/space.

The female is usually the first, 95%, to move off the boast which is actually the male’s fault/doing as they usually do NOT help, share and support as much as they should, and/or expect status quo. Most long term married males live a boards do/help the majority of the domestic chores and cater to the female/wife comforts/needs.

The marina and the slip are equal, may be more important, then the boat as getting to/from and on/off the boat is more difficult, especially if there is a tide that effect the dock/ramps, and/or a long walk down/up the dock. So logistics, timing and marine facilities/service/support become important.
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Old 08-28-2012, 11:43 AM   #12
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It would help if we knew the area/location you plan on being a live aboard
We will be moving from the UK to Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands some 70 miles south of England.

Quote:
and a little more about past/present life/boating

We have been boating for over 25 years, starting with fast sportsboats and upgrading to sports cruisers and finally to the Fleming 55.

Quote:
and what your expectations about being a live aboard are?
The start of retirement !

Quote:
I would shed only the dirt stuff that can be easily replaced, until you get through at least one winter. Many
Quote:
loving compatible couples living in a larger dirt dwelling are not as loving/compatible in a smaller boat with limited resources/space. The female is usually the first, 95%, to move off the boat which is actually the male’s fault/doing as they usually do NOT help, share and support as much as they should, and/or expect status quo. Most long term married males live a boards do/help the majority of the domestic chores and cater to the female/wife comforts/needs.
This was great advice. We have had long periods (2 months or so) at a time on the boat, but no longer. My wife, Lin (mamabear) has just joined the forum and will no doubt join in the discussion!

Quote:
The marina and the slip are equal, may be more important, then the boat as getting to/from and on/off the boat is more difficult, especially if there is a tide that effect the dock/ramps, and/or a long walk down/up the dock. So logistics, timing and marine facilities/service/support become important.

This is all really helpful. Thank you.
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Old 08-28-2012, 12:13 PM   #13
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Find a friend or relative that will store a few boxes for you when the move takes place.
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Old 08-28-2012, 01:19 PM   #14
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Slightly different situation but we went through a downsizing several years ago and stored what we could not use in the new home. 3 years later we wised up and realized it was cheaper to give away or donate everything than keep it.
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Old 08-28-2012, 03:59 PM   #15
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It sounds like you will base yourself in a marina and perhaps take weeklong cruises to places in France and England, but stay primarily in Guernsey.

I would plan to store anything that would have value 1-2 years later and would need to be replaced if you don't like the liveaboard life. You never know how it will work out for you.

If after a year you still love it, then sell or give away what is in storage. By then you will know what you need and will be pretty committed to the liveaboard life.

David
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Old 08-28-2012, 05:44 PM   #16
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We're in our 10th year of living onboard. My wife and I put this song together a couple of years ago based on everything we learned and what we experienced by living aboard.

The most important verse is the last:

So now we're out there cruising,
Life on the water now,
A life that's hard to beat.
It isn't just the places,
It isn't just the sunsets,
It's the people that we meet.

My advice is to make sure you're in environments where you'll meet and get to know a variety of people. The ones who do that stay onboard in my experience.
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Old 08-29-2012, 12:15 AM   #17
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What to keep

House hold furnishings unless family or priceless heirlooms are cheaper to replace that store. I stored mine for a year and ended up giving it away to my girls and friends. Tools, on the other hand are just to important to me so I built a rolling shop in a 26' trailer that contains most of my hand tools and some of my stationary machines. Drill press, band saw, and sanding station. The rest my large stationary machines I gave to a close friend with the hopes if I need to use them in the future I could. Working with my hands is very important to me so this was a solution that I'm glad I used. Sporting equipment like skis and bikes can be rented so choose carefully. Clothes can be paired down to what you really wear. After two years I still have clothes I don't wear on board. One of the beauties of living on a boat is that you can get rid of a lot of things that take time out of your life with maintenance. Things like lawns and gardens, no point owning really nice car as there just isn't a secure place to keep it. Usually they sit in the weather at some marina and are exposed to dings and dents of parking lots anyway. One of the things I miss is a secure place to park my car and truck. The biggest inconvenience I've found is hauling things on and off the boat from the car. The rest of the the life style is much better than in subdivision or apartment style dwelling.
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Old 08-29-2012, 08:31 AM   #18
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The biggest inconvenience I've found is hauling things on and off the boat from the car.
Get a foldable wagon. Sam's Club has them. Other places too I suspect. They're deep enough to hold a lot of stuff, and fold up small enough to store onboard, in the lazarette or under bench seating. The wheels are big enough to roll over most gravel parking lots. You should be able to snag one for about $90.
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Old 08-29-2012, 12:59 PM   #19
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Another vote for "sell". It's amazing just how much stuff one doesn't need....
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Old 08-29-2012, 02:06 PM   #20
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Another vote for "sell". It's amazing just how much stuff one doesn't need....
How many of the replies are people that have actually been/tried being a live aboard in the cold, rainy, windy northern climates?

Walking several time a day, down/up a moving narrow floating dock, pouring down rain, dark, high winds can/is daunting and precarious. My wife has fallen in twice, both times she was very very lucky, people/I saw/heard her to pull her out, and I been in once. So make sure you female/wife is safe/protected. Better to wait for the right marina/dock/slip than to rush things. We waited 3 years before moved to Everett until an acceptable slip open up.

I had the marina install dock ladders at the bow and stern, throw life ring and I have hung ropes/lines from the dock, build steps that extend out beyond the dock so the space is limited, and keep the boat lines as tight as I can. Tight lines reduce the sudden jerk, noise/squeak and chaffing/damage to the lines. The only movement is the give of the fenders/bumpers. So make sure your boat, marina, dock, slip and you are live aboard safe and ready.

Do not over commit until your wife knows for sure.
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