Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-29-2013, 09:34 AM   #121
Veteran Member
 
islandtimecruiser's Avatar
 
City: Cape Coral,Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Island Time
Vessel Model: 1990 Marine Trader DB
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deidra View Post
Still learning to navigate this site - hope this is the correct way to "reply". Master looks awesome! The boat we have a contract on is an 88 MT so your pics are doubly helpful. Good tip about the plexiglass. What are you using to hang them?
I use the 3M (I think) hangars that are removable. Amazing that the sticky stuff actually sticks. Doesn't damage the wood and can be removed without residue. I've used them for months now and no problems. They have some that will hold 9-12 lbs (I'm not hanging anything that heavy but I use the large ones for big pictures hoping to compensate for the rock and roll of the boat).

Yes, it is good that some women are on the blog!

We have a blog of some of our recent projects -- it, too, is a work in progress.
Island Time Cruiser | Cruising adventures of Capt. Steve and Regina on their 38' trawler
__________________
Advertisement

islandtimecruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2013, 01:11 PM   #122
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
Well, I am a not woman! I tell new live a boards they should make the boat comfortable and live able as they are going to be a live a board 100% of the time and cruise away from the dock a small % of the time. Being we were newbie’s/wantabe’s when we bought the Eagle, and we did not like and/or could afford most of the boat/marine so we used domestic/land stuff which had more of warm home feel.

Originally with all the teak and the small ports made the staterooms/bathroom/hall so dark, so we wanted to lighten and brighten them up. The only lighting was the 12 volt in the ceiling, and some of them did not work. So we added AC 120 volts on the side walls. Some of the 12 volt ceiling light fixtures are domestic land with a 12 volt bulb in them. We painted/roll the ceiling white with a heavy texture, and added the ½ rounds to cover the seams and some are hollow out so wiring was run under them to the ceiling fixtures that did not work and as an accent.

I built and added shelves to most rooms with rails/fiddles so we could have nick nack and stuff, and mirrors to make the room look/fell bigger and brighter. A rub mat or even carpet keeps things from sliding/moving. My wife likes to quilt so she made the quilts, curtains and cushions. As you can see the kitchen light and the light over the table are domestic with 12 volt bulbs. Most of the new LED lights are 12 volt. I made/added the entertainment center and book selves.
.
All the floor are teak, but we decided to carpet to make the floors warmer, insulate from the cold bilge, more homey comfortable on our pedicure feet/toes and keep things from moving/sliding. The carpet is a burbur with a pattern in it as they hold up well, and we have gone to a light green color which hides the dirt. All the teak interior has been varnish and some re stained.

The hall way was so dark we textured wall papered over the teak. We did not want to paint as its hard to change back, and we decided to make one wall in each room other than teak. To much teak. Since we had children/grandchildren staying with us we also decided to remodel and canvas enclose the stern deck so the stern deck is also an additional living play area. In the summer we most eat and use the stern deck. We even carpeted the engine room a light green to match the DD green of the engines and added florescent lighting.

We tried to keep a balance between being nautical and domestic/homey.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	srareeoom head.jpg
Views:	108
Size:	83.3 KB
ID:	17649   Click image for larger version

Name:	Hall.jpg
Views:	114
Size:	185.1 KB
ID:	17650   Click image for larger version

Name:	back deck.jpg
Views:	118
Size:	98.5 KB
ID:	17651   Click image for larger version

Name:	engine room.jpg
Views:	125
Size:	170.2 KB
ID:	17652  
__________________

Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 03:59 PM   #123
Member
 
City: Camano Island, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papa Charlie View Post
First winter was the hardest due to the fact the 32 foot boat was not designed for live a board and an exceptionally cold winter. The boat was surrounded by ice almost a 1/2 inch thick. The second winter we had the new boat, but only by a couple of months so were getting settled in during the winter months. As time goes on you settle in and life gets easier.

Most people look at those who live a board and think we sit around and have the life of leisure. When in fact there is a lot to do and stay on top of. But we wouldn't trade it for land.

Hello All:

We've been following this thread with interest ... both the liveaboard theme and sidebar about the 707. (My husband, Paul, says he heard that story about Tex and would love to know the "true" story as well. He's an aviation buff and wannabe controller who wrote a couple books instead. Now works for an airline.)

We're considering becoming part-time liveaboards during the week, as we're still tied to jobs in the city. We're mining for nuggets about what we don't know that we need to know before leaping in. (We'll definitely follow your Website, PapaBear, as you settle in to your new lives.)

We're looking at Des Moines or Everett Marinas as a possible home port and noted your comments, Papa Charlie, about ice your first year and about there "being alot to do and stay on top of." Could you enlighten us about what this entailed?

We'd also welcome info from those of you who are/have actually lived the life. Can you help us understand day to day realities and maintenance issues we should be savvy to? How do you deal with freezing water? How often is the water shut off during winter months? What was your heat source, how reliable was it, and would you recommend against/for it if you were to choose again?

The furnishing advice we saw here is interesting, too. Of course! One should realize that entry ways would limit the size of a sofa you can put on board. What are some of your favorite, clever solutions you've discovered for helping make life aboard more comfortable and convenient? (e.g. lighting, ventilation, storage ideas, etc. Pictures welcome!)

We're also evaluating what trawler to purchase. We're in a C-Dory now (our first boat) and wanting to move up into something with more creature comforts and space. Not too large, to keep moorage fees reasonable and provide flexibility when requesting transient moorage. Also, since this will be just a crash pad during the week and a cruiser for short-duration (1-4 week) trips in the Pacific Northwest, we're not overly worried about having copious amounts of living space nor multiple berths. While it's not designed as a liveaboard, we're considering a Ranger 31. Love the design and the support and community is highly attractive.

We'd welcome your insights. Thank you!

Amy & Paul
Caiprianha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 05:23 PM   #124
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Welcome to the forum Amy and Paul.

The ranger 31 is a beautiful boat and hard to go wrong with. The wife and I may find ourselves in a similar situation soon and we've thought 34-36 foot Europa design boats may fill the bill nicely. They have a lot more space in just a little more length that may make those mid-week crash nights more comfortable. They are easy to board at the dock and have a nice back porch style cockpit. Here is an example I recently noticed on yachtworld.

2008 North Pacific Europa Sedan Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Which C-Dory do you have?
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 06:22 PM   #125
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
This is going to be short so more later.

I need to clarify, the plywood sticks out 3inch but the foam extend out inch another 3 inches so the foam hang over.

As most know we have been a live a board for 16years 4 years in Everett. This year was mild so the water was only turned off for 3 weeks at a time but the power only went off a couple of times for less than a day. When the water is on make sure the tanks are topped off, and make sure the batteries are charged and make sure gen set starts. A live a board boat should have a heating other than AC eclectic. Over the years we have posted a lot of information. If you have question ask.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 06:29 PM   #126
Member
 
City: Camano Island, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPseudonym View Post
Welcome to the forum Amy and Paul.

The ranger 31 is a beautiful boat and hard to go wrong with. The wife and I may find ourselves in a similar situation soon and we've thought 34-36 foot Europa design boats may fill the bill nicely. They have a lot more space in just a little more length that may make those mid-week crash nights more comfortable. They are easy to board at the dock and have a nice back porch style cockpit. Here is an example I recently noticed on yachtworld.

2008 North Pacific Europa Sedan Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Which C-Dory do you have?

Thanks for the info, Craig. There's a lot we like about the Europa design. Hadn't realized it could be found under 40ft, but I see now that there's also a 36ft Grand Banks model.

Do you know if it's a common design feature in the Europa style to put the galley adjacent to the helm seat? Would be nice to have a first mate's seat in that location.

We're in the CD-19 now. Great trainer boat. We learned to drive a 39ft Tully Craft before buying Caiprianha, so we have some familiarity with the more complex systems on an inboard. Love the control over an outboard, as well. Wouldn't mind bow/stern thrusters, either.

Amy
Caiprianha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 07:07 PM   #127
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
Amy, I've had no reason to research them much but a galley down Europa style would be our ideal too. There are many members here with firsthand experience owning them I'd defer to. We have an Owens express cruiser style and love the side by side helm seat arrangement but as you can see from my avatar I prefer to let my sons drive

Tolly Craft are abundant in your area and the 30' model we found comfortable. Member named Art has a 34' double cabin Tolly down my way that he is always excited to talk about. Mainship makes nice boats as does Bayliner in that size range.

Talk to a local broker is my best advice, it doesn't cost a thing to look around. I wouldn't fall in love with a brand name until have a good look around just yet.
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 07:32 PM   #128
Member
 
City: Camano Island, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 6
Great technique on the driving—will remember that

Thanks for all the info. And, good advice to keep an open mind.

We downsized to a 1 BR apartment for a year or two to make sure we can deal with small spaces, while we explore options.

Amy
Caiprianha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 09:01 PM   #129
Senior Member
 
Papa Charlie's Avatar
 
City: Everett, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Paloma
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 127
Caiprianha,
Hello neighbor. Water freeze control during the winter can vary by marina. Here in Everett, in the older section the pipes are unprotected and they will turn the water off when there is threat of freeze form more than a day or two. In the newer section, 12th street, they never have to turn it off as the pipes are protected.

Finding the right boat is a job, in my opinion. There are a great number of boat designs out there and each offer their good points and their less desirable. I would recommend that you spend some time looking at boats on Yachtworld.com. Try to imagine living on board and having to deal with the tasks of daily life. Such things as cooking, is there sufficient room on the counter to prepare a meal. What about dry storage, freezer storage and ice box. Refrigeration is another consideration, ice boxes or cold plate type are more efficient on energy but do not prolong some foods life such as veggies as they promote moisture and there is no air flow.
Imagine having to store your work cloths, getting ready for work. Is there room to iron? Laundry, do you plan to do it on board or haul everything to the laundry mat or home. Then you have to haul it back.
How big is the holding tank. Most marinas have people that offer pump out services. The come around once a week and pump your tank out. In Everett there is Rose Head Service. Cost varies by tank size. For our 50 gallon tank it is $15 per week. If you both work then a week on a 40 or even a 30 gallon tank is possible. But you have to watch it.
Showering, the best case is to have a separate shower instead of a wet bath. Wet baths offer a chance to clean the bathroom every time you shower but are a pain.
As for heat, diesel mixed with electric is the way to go in my mind. We use the diesel when it gets really cold. Ours is hydronic and all the hoses run through the cupboards and closets so it keeps the compartments warm and dry to prevent condensation and mildew. Diesel forced air is good also but not as efficient in my opinion. Ours also heats our water too. The electric heaters are used most of the time and are cheaper to run.
Something else to consider, as you live in the PNW, are you going to get a covered or uncovered berth. Covered offer protection to the boat and make live aboard life easier as you don't have to load and unload in our drizzly weather.
Papa Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:15 AM   #130
Member
 
City: Camano Island, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 6
Great insights, thanks so much.

Good to know about the pumping service...much more convenient than motoring over to the pump out every week. We're thinking about an Air Head, but need to know more if it is the only head. E.g., can it work efficiently w/ daily use?

I've heard others extoll the benefits of hydronic heat. One comparison I read mentioned more condensation with hydronic vs forced air. Have you noticed any issues with that?

And how do you manage moisture issues with showering on-board during the winter?

Amy
Caiprianha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:32 AM   #131
Senior Member
 
greatpapabear's Avatar
 
City: Beaucette Marina
Country: Guernsey
Vessel Name: Play d'eau
Vessel Model: Fleming 55
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 123
Hi Everyone,

Apologies for being so quiet for so long. We still have no landline and therefore no Internet connection at the boat. Instead, we've found that if we go to the local supermarket and buy a coffee in the café there, we can use their Wi-Fi for 60 minutes.

We officially left the UK on 22 March and although we still have a great deal to 'sort out', we are well on the way to settling in on our new retired lives in Guernsey in the Channel Islands.

If you want to follow our exploits and cruising, we have started a new website for the boat www.playdeau.com where we can keep a 'blog' running as soon as we have our phone line installed which should be this week sometime.

So, all the best to you, and thanks so much for all the advice which has turned out to be just perfect.

Mr and Mrs GreatPapaBear
greatpapabear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 11:42 AM   #132
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caiprianha View Post
Great insights, thanks so much.

Good to know about the pumping service...much more convenient than motoring over to the pump out every week. We're thinking about an Air Head, but need to know more if it is the only head. E.g., can it work efficiently w/ daily use?

I've heard others extoll the benefits of hydronic heat. One comparison I read mentioned more condensation with hydronic vs forced air. Have you noticed any issues with that?

And how do you manage moisture issues with showering on-board during the winter?

Amy



The Hydraulic does not put moisture in the air, you might be thinking of propane. If you are in Everett drop by. We are on the commercial dock, QN2 can miss us we are the first ugly trawler.

Moisture is a big problem, so we use the nice marina facilities. Everett just re did the restroom. I also do the laundry using the marind wash/drier. When we do use the shower its very quick, close the door to keep moisture contained and open the hatch/ports to let the moisture out. We have 7 Dri Easy pots that absorb moisture. Being a live a board you will learn to be conservative with electricity, water, sanitation, everything especially when the temnps drop below freezing.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 02:22 PM   #133
Member
 
City: Camano Island, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Fill View Post
The Hydraulic does not put moisture in the air, you might be thinking of propane. If you are in Everett drop by. We are on the commercial dock, QN2 can miss us we are the first ugly trawler.

Moisture is a big problem, so we use the nice marina facilities. Everett just re did the restroom. I also do the laundry using the marind wash/drier. When we do use the shower its very quick, close the door to keep moisture contained and open the hatch/ports to let the moisture out. We have 7 Dri Easy pots that absorb moisture. Being a live a board you will learn to be conservative with electricity, water, sanitation, everything especially when the temnps drop below freezing.
Everett does have nice marina facilities. And you're confirming for us that it's really more realistic to plan to use them than the boat. The Des Moines marina is also nice and a better commute for us, but one awkward thing: no laundry facilities. We'd likely do laundry on weekends at the house, but there would be some weeks when we'd like to be able to do the wash while we're at the marina.

We'd love to drop by and meet you sometime. We keep our C-Dory in Everett right now, so you may get visitors

Amy
Caiprianha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 03:59 PM   #134
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caiprianha View Post
Everett does have nice marina facilities. And you're confirming for us that it's really more realistic to plan to use them than the boat. The Des Moines marina is also nice and a better commute for us, but one awkward thing: no laundry facilities. We'd likely do laundry on weekends at the house, but there would be some weeks when we'd like to be able to do the wash while we're at the marina.

We'd love to drop by and meet you sometime. We keep our C-Dory in Everett right now, so you may get visitors

Amy
If either the white 2500 dodge pick-up or the white 150 ford pick up there, then we are usually home. Your fob will also work on our gate, so you can knock on the door/hull.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 09:06 PM   #135
Senior Member
 
Papa Charlie's Avatar
 
City: Everett, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Paloma
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4588
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caiprianha View Post
Great insights, thanks so much.

Good to know about the pumping service...much more convenient than motoring over to the pump out every week. We're thinking about an Air Head, but need to know more if it is the only head. E.g., can it work efficiently w/ daily use?

I've heard others extoll the benefits of hydronic heat. One comparison I read mentioned more condensation with hydronic vs forced air. Have you noticed any issues with that?

And how do you manage moisture issues with showering on-board during the winter?

Amy
We only shower on board. Have had no issues with moisture. We squeegy the shower down after use, open a window and put a fan blowing into the shower to complete the drying. If too cold when the diesel heater is running just leave windows closed and run the fan blowing into the shower.

As for hydronic causing moisture that is not true at all. You are drying the air in the boat not adding to it. Forced air systems can introduce air into the boat and cause moisture. Cooking is a concern, we always run the exhaust fan on low over the stove when cooking. People, showers and cooking are the biggest contributors to moisture. We use dehumidifiers, the small type you buy from West Marine in some rooms. The forward berth we use a larger unit that removed water from the air and adds heat in its place. They are highly recommended. But don't run it all the time.

http://www.lowes.com/pd_336444-70213-LAD504DUL_0__?productId=3391058&Ntt=dehumidifiers& pl=1¤tURL=%3FNtt%3Ddehumidifiers&facetInfo=

We have a Spledide stackable washer/dryer that I installed on board. The secret to doing laundry on board is to make sure the unit vents over board. The dryer exhaust contains a great deal of moisture. Non vented dryers don't work well at all. Vented units are great. Close to home 220V units but not quite. We are very pleased with our units. I need to finish the teak trim on the compartment in the hall way but here is a link to the units and a picture of our units installed.

Compact Stacked Washer and Dryer - PPL Motor Homes

Papa Charlie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 10:33 PM   #136
Member
 
City: Camano Island, WA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Fill View Post
If either the white 2500 dodge pick-up or the white 150 ford pick up there, then we are usually home. Your fob will also work on our gate, so you can knock on the door/hull.
Roger that...we'll definitely stop by next time we're in the neighborhood.

And thanks so much, Papa Charlie, for the great insights. Squeegee makes sense to help get moisture out of the shower very quickly. And I'm hearing a common theme about de-humidifiers.

We're excited about this...but will have to live vicariously through you until we figure out the right boat and pull the cord next year.

Amy
Caiprianha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 05:52 AM   #137
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
A furnace that is vented , coal, oil or propane does not add moisture inside the boat.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 10:28 AM   #138
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
A furnace that is vented , coal, oil or propane does not add moisture inside the boat.
Gee FF I am shocked as that was one of your biggest points against propane!

However, i agree as we had a vented CAT propane heater for 6 years with no moisture problem.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2013, 07:19 AM   #139
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
"Gee FF I am shocked as that was one of your biggest points against propane!"

Have you confused me with someone else

I LOVE!!! propane for refrigeration and cooking.

Its expensive and a PIA as a winter fuel setup.

The oil fired ranges like the Dickinson are my favorite for winter liveaboard , cheap to keep, operate on untaxed house oil and work the weeks the electric is inop.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2013, 06:29 PM   #140
Newbie
 
City: Sarasota Florida
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4
Our first liveaboard, an Island Packet 440 with tons of storage. When we came ashore we had not touched a third of the stuff.

Find a relative or good friend who will allow you to keep some stuff in an unused closet. If you are embarrassed about asking for the space, that is an indication you are asking for too much space.
__________________

Charmed is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012