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Old 10-25-2012, 11:28 PM   #1
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securing for hurricanes

I am a total neophyte to this forum. I would like to know what should be done to my boat while docked at the marina to protect it from hurricanes? Any and all advice is welcome!
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:33 AM   #2
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I would like to know what should be done to my boat while docked at the marina to protect it from hurricanes?

Select a marina NOT in a coastal hurricane Zone.
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:37 AM   #3
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Select a marina NOT in a coastal hurricane Zone.
First and best option ... everything else is faith based.

All the hardware and forethought and experience in the world will not protect you from the guy nearby who didn't take any precautions.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:09 AM   #4
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I am a total neophyte to this forum. I would like to know what should be done to my boat while docked at the marina to protect it from hurricanes? Any and all advice is welcome!
Lots of ropes and fenders. I bought two 600' rolls of 1 1/4" line and used them all during our last storm. Charge your batteries and make sure you have anything that will blow around tied down.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:26 AM   #5
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Haul out.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:48 AM   #6
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Remove all canvas, cushions, grills, and anything that can become a projectile. Secure the bimini framing. Double lines all around including spring lines. You have to at least double up so if one chafs through another is still there. And make sure your scuppers are clear and unobstructed. Tie the boat as securely as you can in the middle of the slip so it can't crash into docks or pilings.

And encourage your slip neighbors to do the same.
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Old 10-26-2012, 08:52 AM   #7
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Buy more bourbon.
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Old 10-26-2012, 09:10 AM   #8
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Alright guys, Bess had the best and most usable answer. It's too late to change marinas, so do the best you can as Bess just outlined. He is already in the path of the storm.

A lot depends on where the boat is, and the marina situation. I would also ask the old hands and marina staff what is the usual preparation.

Where is Newport? NC, VA, RI, or other?

Moonstruck is getting pounded by 38 mph winds right now.
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Old 10-26-2012, 09:14 AM   #9
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My community is on a small peninsula. A few of the hand wringing, old wimmen are asking, "What is the Board going to do about this storm? Will the association be providing sand bags?"

Really? People funny.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:38 AM   #10
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Here's a lesson I learned during September's Hurricane Isaac: don't tie your lines too short. If the water rises too high the lines basically hold your boat in place and can swamp the boat if the water keeps coming up. Isaac came through with the highest water ever seen in my area. I sweated this one out big time as I knew my lines were tied short so the radar mast wouldn't poke a hole through the roof over my slip. Got lucky this time.
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Old 10-26-2012, 11:51 AM   #11
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We regularly have 100 mph winds gusts in the winter.
My boat looks like it has a spiderweb of lines and lots of fenders.
Once she is tied. Push and pull on the boat every way you can to be sure she won't hit anything. She should stand static on her lines.

Then the single malt.

And bon chance to you.

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Old 10-26-2012, 03:43 PM   #12
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Moonstruck is getting pounded by 38 mph winds right now.

So I have to ask...... Is a 38 mph wind considered high in your area or are you being facetious?
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Old 10-26-2012, 04:21 PM   #13
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I have been living aboard for a long time. Over the years I have seen alot of marinas fail through major weather events. Yet something few pay much attenion too. Boats along with parts of a marina can become some very nasty projectiles you simply stay clear of. To watch in horror as they rip through what used to be sound sections of the facility.

Some marinas will respect your input when you see an issue. Some not so much. But remember they hold no accountability, it is realy left up too you and your insurance. So sometimes its best to act and ask for forgiveness after that weather event. Like adding a line to a dock where the connection's to sections are or a zap strap to hold a power cable away from something that it could chaff on etc etc. Rope accross from finger to finger or such.

Just some random thoughts.

I hope all stay safe and there boats weather the storm.
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:22 PM   #14
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Quote:
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We regularly have 100 mph winds gusts in the winter.
My boat looks like it has a spiderweb of lines and lots of fenders.
Once she is tied. Push and pull on the boat every way you can to be sure she won't hit anything. She should stand static on her lines.

Then the single malt.

And bon chance to you.

Sd
While we don't get 100 mph gusts unless it's a hurricane, here in Florida we do get 30-45 kt gusts frequently in the winter. Lots of fenders and lines. When we prepare for a TS or Hurricane,we too have 15 or more lines in a web on our boat. Also, in a marina or at a dock, we have pulled out of our slip and dropped two anchors, then back in the slip to keep us off the dock (if the marina doesn't want anchors in the marina channels, we have dropped our anchor and chain in the slip to help keep the bow straight- helps if you live aboard and are riding out the storm). Depending on the storm, we sometimes take off all bridge canvas or roll up the eisenglass (with towels inside each rolled up eisenglass as it will get scratched if you don't) so the wind can get through.

Best of luck to you folks in Sandy's path.
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:44 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Moonstruck is getting pounded by 38 mph winds right now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
So I have to ask...... Is a 38 mph wind considered high in your area or are you being facetious?
My thought exactly.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:28 AM   #16
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"Haul out."

BUT be sure to find out what the Cat 5 storm surge is in that area.

Hauling out in a marina ,20 ft above High Water level, will not help if the local area storm surge is 30 FT.

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Old 10-27-2012, 09:06 AM   #17
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Lots of lines with chafe protection, canvas down, power off. shore power cord off, fridge empty of perishables,
If you are in an area subject to surge be sure the lines while holding the boat in the middle of the slip will be slack enough for the boat to rise with the tide.
Good luck, it is a great feeling to go to the boat after a bad storm and find her still afloat. I have been lucky 3 times so far, knock on wood!
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Old 10-27-2012, 10:22 AM   #18
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Check BoatUS, they have a good check list.
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Old 10-27-2012, 10:22 AM   #19
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Hurricane Checklist
  • Install storm lines and chafe gear. Double line everything.
  • Remove roller furling headsails.
  • Lash sail covers or remove sails completely.
  • Lower bimini (lash to deck or take ashore).
  • Remove tarps from dock canopies.
  • Make sure your dock box is locked, to keep the cover closed.
  • Remove shore power cords, phone line cords, and shore water hose.
  • Remove all deck gear that could blow around in the storm (stow below or take ashore).
  • Dinghies must be removed from the marina.
  • Shut off all lines to fuel, propane, alcohol tanks, etc. Remove any propane tanks that are exposed outdoors.
  • Fill water tanks and close valves.
  • Close fuel tank valves and tape over vents to prevent water from blowing in.
  • Charge batteries and turn off all DC systems except automatic bilge pumps.
  • Close all seacocks except cockpit drains (make sure drain hoses are secure).
  • Secure or remove all articles inside vessel (take breakable and expensive articles including electronics ashore).
  • Remove or plug all ventilation cowls and close deck plates.
  • Plug engine exhaust ports to keep water out.
  • Secure and seal all hatches and companionway covers. Duct tape all seams at windows, hatches, cowlings, etc.
  • Check to be sure all lines are tied properly and will not slip off cleats, either on the boat or the dock. Make sure chafe protection is on all wear points.
  • Secure fenders at base of stanchions, NOT on lifelines.
  • Remove all important documents from the boat, such as Federal documentation, insurance policy, state registrations, etc.
  • Ensure that your shaft logs are not leaking excessively. Remember that when the power is out for a few days, the bilge pumps may exhaust your batteries.
  • Do not stay aboard. Evacuate by a planned route.
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Old 10-27-2012, 01:21 PM   #20
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My thought exactly.
No we get 38 mph winds frequently in thunderstorms, but they don't usually sustain for 48 hours or so. Also the sustained winds blowing water in from the sea creates extremely high tides and a surge in the harbor. That surge bounces of sea walls and makes for very bouncy waves that put a lot of stress on lines That's the difference in a brief storm and a near brush by a hurricane. This time the winds stayed below 50.
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