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Old 10-28-2012, 01:37 PM   #41
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Impact direction
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:18 PM   #42
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Sometimes staying at the dock is not a good option. Hurricane Hugo Cat 5 near Charleston SC in 1989


There is NO escape from a Cat5 no matter where you are!
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Old 10-28-2012, 06:50 PM   #43
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If you are living on your boat and a hurricane is coming, it might be best to move to a motel for a day or two.
I know nothing about hurricanes but I am very surprised that there aren't more advice like the one above. Am I missing something? Shouldn't one prepare one's boat for an impending storm and get the hell out. It's just a boat and no one should be put in harms way protecting it.
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:53 PM   #44
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There is NO escape from a Cat5 no matter where you are!
Only two category 5's have made landfall at that intensity. Most weaken as they approach shore.
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:01 PM   #45
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Hurricane Frances Cat 3 Ft. Pierce 2004

Lady Dianne is a 100' yacht

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Old 10-28-2012, 08:58 PM   #46
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We wish you guys well. Not that it`s going to help any,but we really do. Good Luck. BruceK Sydney Australia.
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:06 AM   #47
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It's that time of year again?
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Old 10-29-2012, 01:30 AM   #48
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Thanks. I guess Marin and I were wondering as it is fairly common to get sustained gale and storm force winds this time of year in the PNW. Hurricane force is common off of Vancouver Island as well.


Picture of local marina breakwater in a storm.
Ah yes. It was so much fun trying to get anything done in the Gulf this spring. I think I might have been hiding behind a pile of rocks on Hornby Island when that picture was taken.

I'm beginning to think that despite our winter winds there's a lot of bad mooring habits in this part of the world that don't cut it down there in Hurricane Alley.
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Old 10-29-2012, 03:32 AM   #49
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That's some photo, I wonder about all those logs that must have missed the break wall and went barrelling down the bay and hit who knows what.
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:09 AM   #50
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"Also, this is one of those times that a floating dock is worth every penny."

In Long Island Sound the surge is expected at about 10 ft , with of course waves on top of the surface.

Most floating docks do not have pilings that are 20+ ft above normal high water.

Laying to in a creek would give a boat a better chance of not being sold to the insurance co.
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:18 AM   #51
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Most floating docks do not have pilings that are 20+ ft above normal high water.

Laying to in a creek would give a boat a better chance of not being sold to the insurance co.
Right you are Fred. Fred lives on one of the best hurricane holes around. He should know. The picture from Hugo was where the floating docks went away taking the boats with them. The picture from Ft. Pierce is from my marina. Maybe you can see why I get out, hauled, and tied down.
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Old 10-29-2012, 07:29 AM   #52
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I know nothing about hurricanes but I am very surprised that there aren't more advice like the one above. Am I missing something? Shouldn't one prepare one's boat for an impending storm and get the hell out. It's just a boat and no one should be put in harms way protecting it.
That is absolutely correct, in my opinion!
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:48 AM   #53
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This boat was tied down in a boatyard during hurricane Ike. No damage to boats with floating slips.
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Old 10-29-2012, 09:27 AM   #54
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This boat was tied down in a boatyard during hurricane Ike. No damage to boats with floating slips.
Ouch! Looks like no high ground at the boat yard. I still think that the storm surge is usually worse in the Gulf than the Atlantic side. My insurance company and I still prefer to take our chances with a haul out. No method is fool proof. I would rather be in Fred's cove behind the locks away from any surge.

If I were going to layup the boat for any period in South Florida, it would be at a yard or dock on the Caloosahatchee. Inland, fresh water, and away from the surge.
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Old 10-29-2012, 10:14 AM   #55
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We are baby sitting our companies' floating cranes and various barges in Port Newark,N.J. New York Harbor is closed at this time. We are one of the few emergency response vessels that will be allowed to move during the next 48 hrs (for ship rescue at sea if need be.). This last high tide had 1' of dock left above water and it should be 6-12 feet higher tonight and tomorrows high tide. Wind hasn't even started to crank yet.
Our two largest heavy lift cranes were busy for 9 months after Katrina doing wreck removal in New Orleans of sunken tugs, barges, shrimp boats etc. Needless to say, the company wants to use best efforts to keep them safe.
Be careful everyone!
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:01 PM   #56
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Tears ago-I lived in SE NC, just above Little River, SC. The first hurricane I had to with with a boat was David. We followed several shrimpboats up a creek off the Calabash River, all tied to trees with as many lines as you had. We stayed on the boat and were fine, a bit scary, but fine. I know one guy with a 53' Hatt who tied the boat up to a bunch of derelict pilings in the Waccamaw River during Hugo. He and his son stayed on the boat and made it through.

Up a creek (with a paddle?)trees being blown over is not really a problem. After Hugo hit Charleston, you could drive north of Charleston and half the trees in the Marion Nat'l Forest were blown down, but they all break off about 25-30 feet above ground. You tie down to the base of the tree.

After Hugo, the ICW from Charleton, from Isle of Palm all the way to Deewee/Bull Island was littered with boats that had been swept out of marinas. They were all on the inland side of the ICW, At the north end of Isle of Palms, opposite the Wild Dune Marina and the Isle of Palms Marina, there was a huge pile off boats, probably a mile long, just piled on top of each other in the marsh. It was actually pretty amazing to look at.
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:22 PM   #57
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...............After Hugo, the ICW from Charleton, from Isle of Palm all the way to Deewee/Bull Island was littered with boats that had been swept out of marinas. They were all on the inland side of the ICW, At the north end of Isle of Palms, opposite the Wild Dune Marina and the Isle of Palms Marina, there was a huge pile off boats, probably a mile long, just piled on top of each other in the marsh. It was actually pretty amazing to look at.
Some of them are still there.
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:50 PM   #58
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I know nothing about hurricanes but I am very surprised that there aren't more advice like the one above. Am I missing something? Shouldn't one prepare one's boat for an impending storm and get the hell out. It's just a boat and no one should be put in harms way protecting it.
Of course you're right about that....it is just a boat, but if something were to destroy my boat, even though it's just a boat, it would probably have a deep emotional effect on me, and I'd likely spend a great deal of effort, time and money trying to avoid that wise and objective viewpoint. Lots of us love our boats,....a rediculous and foolish attachment that is, nevertheless, human.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:31 AM   #59
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Of course you're right about that....it is just a boat, but if something were to destroy my boat, even though it's just a boat, it would probably have a deep emotional effect on me, and I'd likely spend a great deal of effort, time and money trying to avoid that wise and objective viewpoint. Lots of us love our boats,....a rediculous and foolish attachment that is, nevertheless, human.
I guess I understand a little more now. It's the "love" and "attachment" part I was missing. I guess we all feel differently about our boats. I would be sad if my boat were destroyed but only until it is replaced.

Good luck to all that are in this storm's path.
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Old 10-30-2012, 10:35 AM   #60
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Of course you're right about that....it is just a boat, but if something were to destroy my boat, even though it's just a boat, it would probably have a deep emotional effect on me, ......
Not as deep an effect as being dead!

You have to know when to let it go and take your chances. You do the best you can to move it or secure it, but that's all you can do.

In addition to risking your life and perhaps your family's lives, you put rescue people in danger if you expect them to rescue or evacuate you when the situation gets past what you can handle.
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