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Old 10-27-2012, 02:45 PM   #21
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Thanks. I guess Marin and I were wondering as it is fairly common to get sustained gale and storm force winds this time of year in the PNW. Hurricane force is common off of Vancouver Island as well.

Don't really even go and check on the boat unless it's going to blow over 40 (knots).

Picture of local marina breakwater in a storm.

Never spent any time in your area, so just curious.
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Old 10-27-2012, 02:52 PM   #22
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Lots of ropes and fenders. I bought two 600' rolls of 1 1/4" line and used them all during our last storm. Charge your batteries and make sure you have anything that will blow around tied down.
1,200 feet of line to tie a boat to a dock? It must have looked like one of those potholder kits we used to make for our mothers when we were kids!
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Old 10-27-2012, 02:58 PM   #23
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Here's a lesson I learned during September's Hurricane Isaac: don't tie your lines too short. If the water rises too high the lines basically hold your boat in place and can swamp the boat if the water keeps coming up. .....
On the assumption that you have a fixed dock. Advice for a floating dock would be different.

For anyone who hasn't been through this before, the best people to ask are the other slip holders and the dock master at your own marina. Different marinas face different risks and are constructed differently.

At my marina, boats must vacate or be pulled and stored on land by the marina staff (they charge for this). The current storm has not caused this to happen at my marina, it is far enough offshore to just bring strong winds and some rain.
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:04 PM   #24
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.......- helps if you live aboard and are riding out the storm). .............
If you are living on your boat and a hurricane is coming, it might be best to move to a motel for a day or two.
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:06 PM   #25
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No we get 38 mph winds frequently in thunderstorms, but they don't usually sustain for 48 hours or so. Also the sustained winds blowing water in from the sea creates extremely high tides and a surge in the harbor. That surge bounces of sea walls and makes for very bouncy waves that put a lot of stress on lines That's the difference in a brief storm and a near brush by a hurricane. This time the winds stayed below 50.
Don: You bring up a good point on the storm surge. When we were in Mexico, a hurricane's storm surge, was not a consideration, less than a foot. In the PNW maybe a tsunami?

It seems to me the storm surge on your coast and the Gulf is where the real damage can be done. How do you prepare for that?

Ike, 2008, 15-20' above normal tide levels. Katrina, 2005, 25-28' and Isabel, which impacted the Chesapeake in 2003, 8'.
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Old 10-27-2012, 03:14 PM   #26
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Thanks for the clarification. In our area and probably in Norther Spy's area, too, as he's on the very large Strait of Georgia, fronts that bring sustained winds of 30-45 mph are fairly common, particularly in the winter. But these winds generally only last in this strength for a day or less. They often bring gusts of 50 to 60 mph, however. The highest gusts recorded in Bellingham harbor since we've kept our boat there have been 80 mph.

I would not be surprised to learn that Northern Spy's home port can be subject to stronger winds than our area.
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Old 10-27-2012, 04:32 PM   #27
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Don: You bring up a good point on the storm surge. When we were in Mexico, a hurricane's storm surge, was not a consideration, less than a foot. In the PNW maybe a tsunami?

It seems to me the storm surge on your coast and the Gulf is where the real damage can be done. How do you prepare for that?' and Isabel, which impacted the Chesapeake in 2003, 8'.
Larry, I think you will find that places like along the northern Gulf coast tend to have the highest storm surges. The Gulf is like a big lake with no where for the water pushed ahead of the storm to go. Hurricane Camille in I think '69 was pushing a 25' surge with about a 12' breaking sea on top. It came in around Long Beach and Pass Christian MS and caused massive destruction and loss of life. Once the water is funneled into a fairly confined area, it rises exponentially over what it would in a more open area.

The opposite of that usually happens along the Florida west coast. With the counter-clockwise motion of the wind, a storm moving north will tend to blow water away from that coast. Hurricane Charlie that caused so much damage around Punta Gorda was one of those. It came up along the coast and all of a sudden turned right across Little Captiva Island. Most of the damage from Charlie was wind damage.

Take a look at the coast line on the East Coast. In the South we have the highest tides around the Georgia/SC line. The water funnels into there. In the North the Bay of Fundy is narrow and has about 49' tides.

Due to the counter-clockwise spin of a hurricane, on the East coast it tends to pile the water up as it goes. If floating docks hold together and the spud poles are tall enough, they will ride up and down. Mostly we have fixed docks. Also, boats seem to be packed in like sardines or Sandy River Smelts for you West coast guys. Not much space between pilings, so lines must be adjusted as the water rises and falls. The big decision is whether to haul or not. We hauled last fall at Hilton Head, and for Isaac this year at Ft. Pierce. I came close to making that decision with Sandy, but no track showed it coming ashore.
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Old 10-27-2012, 06:12 PM   #28
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Due to the counter-clockwise spin of a hurricane, on the East coast it tends to pile the water up as it goes.
With only a year and a half of boating experience on the East Coast (although 30+ years on the West Coast), I'm learning more than I ever wanted to know about hurricanes. Under current predictions (which change hourly) Sandy will hit land right about the Delaware Bay. This will cause surge in the bay and anything to the right (north) of it. It will likely draw water OUT of Chesapeake Bay (just like during Irene) as the spin will push water out to sea and bay levels will drop, not rise.

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Old 10-27-2012, 07:12 PM   #29
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With only a year and a half of boating experience on the East Coast (although 30+ years on the West Coast), I'm learning more than I ever wanted to know about hurricanes. Under current predictions (which change hourly) Sandy will hit land right about the Delaware Bay. This will cause surge in the bay and anything to the right (north) of it. It will likely draw water OUT of Chesapeake Bay (just like during Irene) as the spin will push water out to sea and bay levels will drop, not rise.

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Due to the funnel shape of the Delaware Bay I would think that it would pile water up in there quite a bit. Do you think it will get to Philadelphia? Do you think it will affect New Castle?

That bay is notoriously rough. I had a friend take a 43' Hatteras to Opsail '76 in New York Harbor. He came back into Morehead City with the Imron paint beat off the bow of his boat.
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:23 PM   #30
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Due to the funnel shape of the Delaware Bay I would think that it would pile water up in there quite a bit. Do you think it will get to Philadelphia? Do you think it will affect New Castle?
All depends on where Sandy hits land. Philadelphia is under a flood alert starting tomorrow evening and the combination of heavy rain, high fall tides and the storm surge up the bay could make a lot of new waterfront property. New Castle DE? Likely. New Castle PA (NW of Pittsburgh)? Unlikely.

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Old 10-27-2012, 08:56 PM   #31
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....... the best people to ask are the other slip holders and the dock master at your own marina. Different marinas face different risks and are constructed differently..........
+1

Also, this is one of those times that a floating dock is worth every penny.
We put double lines on everything and all works out good - most of the time.
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Old 10-27-2012, 09:17 PM   #32
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Would it ever be prudent to take the boat out of the marina and run up one of the nearby coastal rivers for ten miles or so and just drop three or four anchors? Along with securing all deck gear and following the other recommended preparations of course. I don't yet have my liveaboard but if I did I would not feel comfortable around all those docks in a marina and the storm surging into a captured harbor. I would want to be in a free flowing river where the water can rise and fall without constraints.
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Old 10-27-2012, 09:30 PM   #33
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Would it ever be prudent to take the boat out of the marina and run up one of the nearby coastal rivers for ten miles or so and just drop three or four anchors? Along with securing all deck gear and following the other recommended preparations of course. I don't yet have my liveaboard but if I did I would not feel comfortable around all those docks in a marina and the storm surging into a captured harbor. I would want to be in a free flowing river where the water can rise and fall without constraints.
For some folks, that's a good plan. Of course, you need a way to get off the boat and back home or wherever you're evacuating to.
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Old 10-27-2012, 09:33 PM   #34
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Would it ever be prudent to take the boat out of the marina and run up one of the nearby coastal rivers for ten miles or so and just drop three or four anchors? Along with securing all deck gear and following the other recommended preparations of course. I don't yet have my liveaboard but if I did I would not feel comfortable around all those docks in a marina and the storm surging into a captured harbor. I would want to be in a free flowing river where the water can rise and fall without constraints.
The simple answer is yes. I think you are referring to what is called a "hurricane hole". If you can find a relatively protected area up a river or creek to secure your boat, you would probably be better off than in a Marina. When we kept a boat at Orange Beach, AL we had such a place in Soldiers Creek off Perdido Bay. We could anchor and secure the boat to shore with long lines. We had some near misses, but fortunately did not get to test it out for real. When in Morehead City, NC we had a place on Queens Creek near Swansboro. I don't recommend staying with the boat. It can be replaced. You can't.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:29 AM   #35
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In the PNW maybe a tsunami?
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Old 10-28-2012, 07:11 AM   #36
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Holy Sh.t!!
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Old 10-28-2012, 09:45 AM   #37
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............ we had such a place in Soldiers Creek off Perdido Bay. We could anchor and secure the boat to shore with long lines. ...........
I've heard of people securing their boats to trees on either side of a creek or canal, but how do you deal with other boats? Nobody can get past your boat in either direction and you can't get past anyone else who has done this.
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Old 10-28-2012, 10:31 AM   #38
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I've heard of people securing their boats to trees on either side of a creek or canal, but how do you deal with other boats? Nobody can get past your boat in either direction and you can't get past anyone else who has done this.
I have done it. People who live on canals have done lots of it. When in a hurricane hole there are usually other boats doing the same. Everyone helps each other. No one is going to move a boat until it's all over. So, the first boats go to the rear, and the others fill up. Many of the boats will be charter boats with professional captains that really know their stuff. They will be glad to help you as they don't want any boats getting loose. It's usually not a problem catching a ride back, because you will probably be pressed into service helping to secure other boats.

I live 11 hours away from my boat. Unless the boat is stored out of the water, I pay a local captain to watch after the boat. I get a status report often to make certain everything is OK. He will move the boat as necessary either for haul out or to a hurricane hole. Having a "local boy" is like magic in securing space. As a matter of fact I have two captains that I can call. My primary captain was on vacation in New Foundland when Isaac came up, so the captain I had for back up moved the boat for haul out, supervised some maintenance, and moved the boat back to her slip. Such is living in the mountains and boating on the coast.
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Old 10-28-2012, 10:33 AM   #39
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After talking to a friend that secured to a tree, I will NEVER say that is a good idea in a hurricane. Trees blow over and can pull your line tight... or worse... fall into running water and drag your boat downstream to who-knows-where. At the height of a storm, you want no part of tending lines either. Especially if there is an emergency.

Don't do it.
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Old 10-28-2012, 11:12 AM   #40
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Sometimes staying at the dock is not a good option. Hurricane Hugo Cat 5 near Charleston SC in 1989

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