Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-22-2016, 09:33 AM   #1
Member
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: US
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
In search of new life aboard

Hello,

Current situation: I am looking to leave the land lover lifestyle with my dog and move to live aboard a vessel. I am hoping for this to take place at least by this time next year but I know there is much research to be done on what boat as well as marina to choose. Instead of renting a apartment or house(Currently about $2200 for rent/utils), I figured why not use that same amount of money towards something that I know I want in the future.I am a complete new guy with large boats. Most time I've spent on one is my dads Glacier Bay Center console for fishing trips.
I am ready for a "live with less" lifestyle. What I would like to know is, I believe my budget for a boat will be in the $110-$125k price range. With this being said it takes a lot of newer vessels out of the picture. What trawlers would you recommend and years to look at that I would be able to afford.
I would like to use this boat to live aboard with a dog, and occasionally my son who will be 3 next year. I would like to travel places when I have the time off, like to the keys, Caribbean, as well as into the Gulf of Mexico. Like I mentioned, this is the start of my research and am very much looking forward to this new life.
Thanks for the time in advance,

Jesse
__________________
Advertisement

Dutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 10:15 AM   #2
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,696
Jesse:

Welcome to the forum. It is definitely a place to discuss your dreams.

Having cruised single handed for most of a year and helped my buddy with his full time single handed cruising for the last 7 years, let me offer some observations:

1. There are a small number of north/south single handed cruisers that work between Key West and Maine winter and summer. I/we ran into them all of the time. They anchor out 99% of the time and don't stay at marinas. It can be a very low cost but lonely lifestyle. I gave it up after less than a year. My buddy did the N/S thing for several years but has now gravitated to a narrower geographical window and now stays in one place more and more including marinas to get power in the winter to stay warm.

2. Another type of live aboard cruisers stay at marinas. If you go month by month so you can do the north/south thing and stay away from the popular areas you can probably get by for $300-400/mo slip fees for a 40' boat.

3. Your budget of $110-125K will get you a pretty nice boat in the 35-42' range. Some that come to mind are the Krogen Manatee 36, a funky, cult like boat with a lot of room for its size but no blue water capability. Another is the blue water capable Krogen 42, but at the higher end of your price range. Lots of others in between including a decent Grand Banks 42. These are all well built solid trawler style cruising boats.

4. Think carefully about your desire to do the Caribbean. Many dream of it, but few do it. Although you could cruise the Caribbean in a Grand Banks 42 by carefully watching the weather, i wouldn't do it. I would consider a Krogen 42 as one of the few boats in your price range that could do it safely. So why limit your choice of boats to satisfy a dream that probably won't happen.

5. A word about cruising with dogs. I (well, my wife actually) trained a puppy to go on a boat, but it is almost impossible to train an older dog. So if that is the case and to be fair to the dog, you have to go ashore twice a day. That is not impossible at all and many do it. It does limit long distance cruises though, but reread #4.

Good luck on your adventure.

David
__________________

djmarchand is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 10:28 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Toolbuddie's Avatar
 
City: Huntsville, AL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sea Note
Vessel Model: Mainship 40
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 185
Welcome Aboard, Jesse
I am not a live aboard so no help with that lifestyle. Good luck, Life on the Water was a drastic change for most of those I Know who have done it. Some stayed some transitioned to part time aboard as are we. Part time Aboard. Weekends and short week long trips. We love the water but cannot do full time. I like dirt and things that grow in it.
Dave
Toolbuddie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 10:29 AM   #4
Member
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: US
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
David,
Thanks for such quick response. Great information too. That is true about how often that I would actually be heading to the Caribbean. Prob not all that much. I prob would do mostly slip month to month so that I would have the access to land for dog and going to work as well. I will keep my truck for transportation still.

Now in regards to the boats, I have seen some of the ones you mentioned. But as the older they are I am sure there are many things to consider. Type of diesels, he's on them and how well they were kept up. I did notice several 1980's type boats that still look incredible but with my lack of knowledge I could be looking at a money pit. Research research is what I need to do. But do you have any knowledge of the older boats that will be in the price range? Should I stick away from ones with a certain type manufacturer for certain years? That sort of thing
Dutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 10:32 AM   #5
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,261
My ex GF and I traveled on my 38 with her dog. A full 90% of the traveling hassles involved accommodating the dog's needs and actions. It was stressful and tiring for me, and created a lot of friction between me and the girl. The dog was happy no matter what, just being a dog on a boat, but high energy constantly.

Some friends and their dog traveled with me, that critter was super easy. Used a pad on back deck, easy to clean up, never jumped off the boat, kept out of the way and was just generally chill. I could travel anywhere with that dog. He was chill even offshore in snot. BTW, those two friends got married!!
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 10:35 AM   #6
Guru
 
City: Satsuma FL/Daytona Beach Shores
Country: United States
Vessel Name: No Mo Trawla
Vessel Model: Hurricane SS188
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 2,153
One additional comment on marinas. Prior to buying the live aboard boat, be sure you have located a slip at a live board marina within reasonable distance from your work place. Also many marinas will charge an additional fee for full time live aboards. It can be substantially more than regular slip fees.

Regarding the dog, in addition to the dog's age, the size of the dog and its daily maintenance requirements can burdensome on a boat. Will your selected marina be close to parks or other areas where you can exercise the dog? If the dog is a barker, the marina might not want him and some marina may place limitations on pets.
Donsan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 10:44 AM   #7
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,261
Regarding engines, boats in the 20-30yr vintage range, here is a list of popular engines that have many examples still plugging along now, still with good parts support, good design, etc:

Ford/Lehman 80,120,135hp non turbo
Caterpillar 3208 210 non turbo, 260,300,320,375 turbo
Perkins 4.239 and 6.354 non turbo
Cummins 4b, 6b and 6c non turbo and turbo
Various John Deere 4 and 6cyl non turbo and turbo
Yanmar 4jh, 4lh, 6lp, 6ly, most all are turbo.

There are other good engines out there, and others will chime in with their experience, but if you find an example with one or two of the above, that is a good start.

If I forgot someone's fave, my apologies, just going off the top of my head.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 11:17 AM   #8
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,696
Jesse:

Never tell a marina or a sheriff's deputy who pulls up to check you out at an anchorage that you are a live aboard. That has a negative connotation. Use the term cruiser or transient cruiser for the marina. That term sometimes gets you in a marina that doesn't allow live aboards (a lot of them) and may even avoid live aboard fees.

I would look at older, well built classics like I mentioned in post #2. Newer boats like Mainships are overpowered and the higher quality, lower powered cruisers like the Nordic Tugs are out of your price range.

Look, look, and make an offer on one you like. Once you have a contract, have a survey done just like a house inspection. That will mostly avoid buying a money pit. IMO your price range is the sweet spot in the age/functionality/quality matrix.

Start with this list of trawlers listed for sale on Yachtworld in the 36-45' range with listing prices of $120-150K to meet your final price objectives. There are 51 boats listed in the US that meet this criteria.

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...dedSelected=-1

David
djmarchand is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 11:28 AM   #9
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,514
Greetings,
Welcome aboard.

__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 11:51 AM   #10
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,252
Welcome Jesse. One thing that wasn't completely clear. Do you still work and is your work location dependent? If so, then you will need to find permanent moorage close to work. In this way, you are using the boat as a floating apartment. Nothing wrong with that but it may influence the type of boat you get.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 12:35 PM   #11
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 3,460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Regarding engines, boats in the 20-30yr vintage range, here is a list of popular engines that have many examples still plugging along now, still with good parts support, good design, etc:

Ford/Lehman 80,120,135hp non turbo
Caterpillar 3208 210 non turbo, 260,300,320,375 turbo
Perkins 4.239 and 6.354 non turbo
Cummins 4b, 6b and 6c non turbo and turbo
Various John Deere 4 and 6cyl non turbo and turbo
Yanmar 4jh, 4lh, 6lp, 6ly, most all are turbo.

There are other good engines out there, and others will chime in with their experience, but if you find an example with one or two of the above, that is a good start.

If I forgot someone's fave, my apologies, just going off the top of my head.
Ski you forgot my Acadia AD30 (a.k.a Hercules) diesel!!! How rude you are!
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 01:03 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 216
I own my boat. No debt. And i budget $2,000 per month for moorage insurance maintenance insurance. Plus operating cost if it leaves the dock.
MVDarlin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 01:45 PM   #13
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct/Punta Gorda, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Atlas Pompano 23
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 4,696
Quote:
Originally Posted by MVDarlin View Post
I own my boat. No debt. And i budget $2,000 per month for moorage insurance maintenance insurance. Plus operating cost if it leaves the dock.
And my buddy, who lives aboard a 1979 CHB 45 probably spends 1/4 of that for the same things. Operating cost can be almost nothing to as much as $500/mo if he is burning fuel as he moves south or north at the end of the season.

Cruising can be very cheap if you don't stay at marinas and do your own maintenance as much as possible.

David
djmarchand is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 04:32 PM   #14
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,027
The nature of your work is a key question as posed above.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 04:33 PM   #15
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,252
Folks keep talking about "cruising". I still am not sure that the OP is talking about cruising or simply using a boat as a floating apartment. It seems to me that the costs of each could be vastly different. For example, how many folks will commute to work by dinghy? Not too many around here but may FL is different. That means a marina with the amenities to make using a boat as a house a viable option.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-22-2016, 09:38 PM   #16
Guru
 
IRENE's Avatar
 
City: Port Angeles, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irene
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 702
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
I am ready for a "live with less" lifestyle.

Jesse
My wife and I both went in this direction when we met. I could not give the decision a higher endorsement, and wish I had "started" years earlier.

Best Wishes

Jeff
IRENE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2016, 06:20 AM   #17
Member
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: US
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
To all, thanks for the information.
Yes I am still currently in the navy stationed at Mayport Fl. I do plan to use it as floating apartment but able to leave on weekends to cruise around and also a few times a year actually take leave to go somewhere. That is my goal.

Djmarchand- thanks for the link and info as well in particular boats.

Thanks again to all who have posted this far.
Dutch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2016, 08:31 AM   #18
Guru
 
Sealife's Avatar
 
City: In transit
Country: From USA
Vessel Name: Sea life
Vessel Model: Krogen 42 #61
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 527
Might consider contacting a buyers broker or even a surveyor/consultant to work with. Might jumpstart the looking process. Get an idea of "total cost". There is purchase, repair/refit/upgrade (inevitable in older boats) maintenance, then all the insurance, moorage, operating cost.

Sure you can fiddle and repair alot on an old boat. How do you want to spend your time off? 20-30 year old plumbing, HVAC, etc. Plan on replacing it if you will be on the boat full time. Maybe not right away(easier as you are not living aboard yet), but while you own the boat. Too many people max out there budget on purchase only, rarely does it go well.
__________________
Scott

www.caribbeansealife.com
Sealife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2016, 11:55 AM   #19
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,027
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
To all, thanks for the information.
Yes I am still currently in the navy stationed at Mayport Fl. I do plan to use it as floating apartment but able to leave on weekends to cruise around and also a few times a year actually take leave to go somewhere. That is my goal.

Djmarchand- thanks for the link and info as well in particular boats.

Thanks again to all who have posted this far.
How long do you think you'll be stationed there? Where might you go next? I ask because relocations are complicated for those with boats, especially those living on them. Ease of moving one might at least play a role in what makes sense.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2016, 02:07 PM   #20
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,252
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
How long do you think you'll be stationed there? Where might you go next? I ask because relocations are complicated for those with boats, especially those living on them. Ease of moving one might at least play a role in what makes sense.
These were the questions that I was thinking of myself.

Anyway, I think it is a great idea and it sounds as if now is a great opportunity to do it since you are relatively unencumbered.

You will want to be sure that the boat that you acquire is setup well for a toddler. A toddler on board can be a challenge unless you prepare well for it and since the boat will be your only option, it will need to be safe.
__________________

__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012