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Old 03-09-2017, 06:17 AM   #1
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Real winter Liveaboard?

Just a reminder if anyone is contemplating living aboard in 2017 , about now is the time to start the purchase and install of a genuine heating system.

Relying on 8 space heaters is not a realistic option.
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Old 03-09-2017, 08:25 AM   #2
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Just a reminder if anyone is contemplating living aboard in 2017 , about now is the time to start the purchase and install of a genuine heating system.

Relying on 8 space heaters is not a realistic option.
While I will keep that in mind should I choose to live aboard, I think most of us SWFL locals focus more on the air conditioning systems.

Ted
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Old 03-09-2017, 09:20 AM   #3
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..nothing beat a diesel heater well installed...
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Old 03-09-2017, 09:51 AM   #4
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The webasto diesel heating system is one of the primary reasons we been a live aboard for 20 years. Keep the entire living area a constant 70+ F degrees, and the boat dry. Best to have an installer be involved with the layout and design. The are expensive but worth it.
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Old 03-10-2017, 03:39 PM   #5
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The webasto diesel heating system is one of the primary reasons we been a live aboard for 20 years. Keep the entire living area a constant 70+ F degrees, and the boat dry. Best to have an installer be involved with the layout and design. The are expensive but worth it.
We lived aboard this winter in the Annapolis area. Got along just fine with two ceramic heaters and one oil-filled radiator.
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Old 03-10-2017, 05:11 PM   #6
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We lived aboard this winter in the Annapolis area. Got along just fine with two ceramic heaters and one oil-filled radiator.
Same with me in Annapolis, 3 electric heaters.

But when the power goes out, it gets cold fast.
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Old 03-10-2017, 05:45 PM   #7
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We lived aboard for 6 winters in Baltimore. We could not keep the boat warm enough with space heaters. We installed an ITR hydronic diesel heater and were very happy with it. Individual temperature control in each room of the boat. We have used it a night or two in Florida.
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Old 03-20-2017, 02:59 PM   #8
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We have built in electric wall heaters in each stateroom and the salon. They are 1000 watt with thermostat control. I just replaced the salon heater with a King pic-a-watt heater, it's nearly silent in operation with the squirrel cage fan. At night the we only heat the berth we sleep in, in the morning I use the built-in and a portable to warm up the salon and then can turn the portable off. I've stayed onboard with low temperatures in the teens and highs in the 20s and was very comfortable. I just came home after being aboard for 2 weeks and the water is warm enough the reverse cycle units put out good heat to warm boat faster in the mornings.
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:14 PM   #9
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I can and have heated my boat in several ways. Electricity is by far the most expensive and I winter in a inexpensive power area (7/kwh). Diesel is 2nd most expensive at $2+/gallon with boiler hydronics and/or cook stove. Wood pellets are 1/2 the cost of diesel, but you have to haul 40# pellet bags. Bought firewood is near what pellets cost but more work hauling and more ash removal. Firewood I cut is the cheapest, but dry storage is an issue and I'm near 70. I burn 2 chords a month in the coldest weather. My diesel, pellet and wood stoves all have water coils for heating the boiler and avoiding diesel use. All done when diesel was $4. Stoves keep the boat much dryer, about 30% or lower humidity. Electric heat keeps the humidity about 60-80% on a normal PNW day.
Cheapest/easiest is diesel for me if the diesel price stays around $2/gallon. For the price of a Wabasco, you'd have to save a ton of money.
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Old 05-10-2017, 05:05 PM   #10
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Can you guys keep your plumbing (water + waste) working in the winter in the colder states that encounter freezing temps or do you winterize those systems and use facilities on-shore?
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Old 05-10-2017, 05:24 PM   #11
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Can you guys keep your plumbing (water + waste) working in the winter in the colder states that encounter freezing temps or do you winterize those systems and use facilities on-shore?
My boat winters in water in Toronto. It is insulated and all water lines have been moved away from the hull sides.
I have a heated winter water inlet that goes to 3 feet below water level and the marina drops all the summer water lines into the water where they won't freeze. I have hot showers and running water all winter and a pumpout on tracks comes right down the dock to the boat. My only reason to go to the onshore facilities is for laundry. Living aboard should not be a camping trip.
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Old 05-10-2017, 06:36 PM   #12
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When living in the Baltimore harbor for six winters, we used all systems aboard the boat. The marina brought the water to the boat all winter. We had the pump out boat visit as needed. We showered and laundried everyday.
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Old 06-15-2017, 07:05 PM   #13
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Can you guys keep your plumbing (water + waste) working in the winter in the colder states that encounter freezing temps or do you winterize those systems and use facilities on-shore?
The Puget sound is a constant 50 degree so below the water line does not freeze, even when the marina freeze over. In addition the webasto diesel also keep the bilge 60+ degrees. The water tanks hold 400 gallon which can last us 2+ weeks. Ss for waste the tank is 50 gallons which is pumped out weekly, and when it can't be pumped the boat has a waste system. We also have a water maker but I have not service it for years and the boat has 2 generators if the power goes out. We do the laundry at the marine, but the boat does have a washer and dryer, but they are small capacity.
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Old 06-15-2017, 07:58 PM   #14
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16 years a liveaboard in Toronto.
It helps that my boat is fully insulated, has a heated water line and plenty of heat plus my genny can be online in minutes in the event of a power outage. The ice eater keeps it floating in it's own 75 foot lake. I have used the genny only 3 days in all that time for power outages.
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Old 06-15-2017, 10:12 PM   #15
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16 years a liveaboard in Toronto.
It helps that my boat is fully insulated, has a heated water line and plenty of heat plus my genny can be online in minutes in the event of a power outage. The ice eater keeps it floating in it's own 75 foot lake. I have used the genny only 3 days in all that time for power outages.
did the boat come insulated or did you do it? if you did it, how?
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Old 06-15-2017, 11:54 PM   #16
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When I bought the boat in NJ it was stock with Monkey fur in the cabins. I removed this and glued half inch flexible unicellular foam to the hull and than glued a nice sof vinyl over that. All the trim was removed and every area I could access was insulated.
Same with the headliner area. I also got 2 x 8 sheets of 1 inch house siding foam which I cut to fit under the mattresses. I get no condensation on the mattress bottoms. In winter I cover all but one window with Reflectrix bubble insulation, 2 layers per window. All waterlines are run central just under the deck and away from the hullsides. I heat with 4 x 750 watt King fan heaters that are very quiet plus a 400 watt ceramic plate heater in the head that is below the towel rack. Engine room is covered by 400 watt oil pan heaters on both Cummins oil pans. The biggest help is a nice tight shrinkwrap, properly vented bottom and top, which stops the wind from stripping heat from the boat. My dock has heated water lines to 3 feet below ice level and a tracked pumpout comes as needed. The panel is well balanced and I have a 50/125/250 cord but I never seem to use more than 25 amps per side even in the coldest parts of the winter.
Two years ago we got a new harbour entrance that has tripled the water exchange from Lake Ontario which never falls below 40 degrees so we have far less ice than when the first picture was taken. Last year I only used the ice eater for 12 days.


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