Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-16-2013, 06:55 PM   #1
Ben
Guru
 
Ben's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: US
Vessel Name: Sand Castle
Vessel Model: 1986 MT Sundeck 35.5
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 693
Live Aboard???

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi..._id=63069&url=

Recently I switched jobs and will be moving to Wilmington, NC. My wife and I are looking for a house in town. Then browsing one day we see this boat. We're boaters, know our way around one, and don't mind adventure. We've never seriously considered living aboard because we've always been 2 hours from real water. Now comes this listing.

My question is, what event turned the corner for you as a live aboard? What's the worst thing and the best thing about it? If a couple, who drove the idea and who had to be convinced? My wife, one might say is "girly". She likes the pleasant side of boating, but not the grungy side. Still, she'll work her fingers to the bone to make sure something's clean though, and this boat looks like a home. She wants a home, and shes willing to see this for fun. Both of us are because its convenient. Living aboard probably won't happen, but stranger things...

The life clock keeps ticking downward, so I think, what if...
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
..................................
Ben

MV Sand Castle
Wilmington, NC
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2013, 08:19 PM   #2
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Ben, if that boat is as represented in the pictures, it should be a great deal. It says composit hull. Would that be glass over wood?

I am not a live aboard, but this sounds like it could be the best of both worlds for you. Wilmington, Wrightsville, Carolina Beach, and Southport are great areas. You could always buy a house if the livaboard didn't work out. That could be a great boat for island cruising.
__________________

__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2013, 08:36 PM   #3
TF Site Team
 
Pack Mule's Avatar
 
City: Paris,TN
Country: USA
Vessel Name: William
Vessel Model: Outer reef 32
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,501
I came across that one the other day while surfing Yachtworld. I like it.
Pack Mule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2013, 09:03 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
City: EC FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 171
The boat you link to seems nice, but I did not pay a lot of attention.

What’s wrong with moving the boat in your avatar to Wilmington?

In our case we jointly made the decision to sell out, move aboard the DeFever and go cruising.

For us it worked out - we sold our waterfront home at the top of the market just because all the improvements we wanted to make to the little DeFever were done. Pure luck.

Once we stopped cruising after 6 years though life in a marina sucked. Everybody knows your business.

So we bought a house on the water just off the ICW and keep the little DeFever at home.

If you are land bound I’d think twice about being a live aboard.

Meanwhile I’m asking my neighbors to drive my Chevy pickup and Honda car once in a while when we head up to the Chesapeake later this summer. Life on land, life on the water, non of it is without complications.

Good luck with your decision.

Mike
Sceptic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-16-2013, 09:29 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
bobsyiruncle's Avatar
 
City: Winnipeg
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Brass Ring
Vessel Model: 38 bayliner
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 147
Good side Boat and price look workable

Bad side: 1) pics are quite old. (2006 some of them)
2) if you do not like it, this will be a PITA to resell
3) Dockage availability and price is an issue (especially liveaboard)
4) some insurers may not appreciate wood
bobsyiruncle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 12:53 AM   #6
TF Site Team
 
Pau Hana's Avatar


 
City: Seattle, WA
Country: Good Ol' US of A!
Vessel Name: Pau Hana
Vessel Model: 1989 PT52 Overseas Yachtfisher
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 1,647
I had always wanted to live aboard a boat, and figured it'd be a great retirement. 2008- was in the midst of a divorce, and was looking for a home to buy. One day, I was chatting with a liveaboard client, and the conversation led to me getting my first liveaboard- a Bayliner 3870. I learned the fine art of de-junkification, downsizing, and the true meaning of "more=less".

5 years later- I'm with a wonderful lady, the ex and I can talk amicably, and I've moved up to a 52' aft cabin.

Make the move, and enjoy the freedom!
__________________
Peter- Marine Insurance Guru & tuna fishing addict!

1989 52' PT Overseas yachtfisher
Pau Hana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 12:56 AM   #7
THD
Guru
 
City: Seattle
Country: US
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,142
Ben-as to the Wilmington area-you will love it-I lived about 30 miles south in Shallotte for about 16 years and it is a great place. As to the boat, if I were interested in trying living aboard, I would give it a try on the boat you have. I know it is not as big, but in the long run, your MT will be a lot less hassle, cost a lot less to maintain, and probably be more comfortable.

The boat you posted is glass over wood. It mentions the "Harker's Island tradition" and many boats, some of the best sports fishing boats made, like Jarrett Bay, are cold molded glass over plank. But it is an old boat. For me to trade your MT for that one, I would have to do an awful lot of work to determine its condition in minute detail and an awful lot of thought to make sure it would be the right liveaboard boat for both of you.

You and your wife will have to agree on the boat and on the location. It would be far easier to move your MT, try it for a while in the Wilmington area and see how you like it. That way, you get the "liveabliard" issue out of the way at little to no cost. If it turns out you both like it, then look around for the most suitable boat for the longer term.

Good luck and enjoy Wilmington!
THD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 07:38 AM   #8
Ben
Guru
 
Ben's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: US
Vessel Name: Sand Castle
Vessel Model: 1986 MT Sundeck 35.5
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 693
All thanks
Our primary plan is essentially to get a house in Wilmington and bring the Marine trader down there. Currently I'm stuck in a 15 month lease with my marina so I won't be in any hurry to bring the Marine Trader from Oriental to Wilmington.

Still a live aboard seems like an interesting way to being in a coastal area and we had not considered it until just looking at this boat which is conveniently located in Wilmington.

Honestly if I threw the living part of my budget totally into a boat, probably would pick a DeFever instead if I had to make that choice. But the chance to try out the live aboard lifestyle is outrageously enticing and that's what garners our interest. So we're using this boat and it's convenience to leverage the thought process of what if... We've always been weekend boaters but the fact that we're moving to Wilmington opens up the door to a whole other set of questions and possibilities.
__________________
..................................
Ben

MV Sand Castle
Wilmington, NC
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 08:30 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
City: Hampton Bays, N.Y.
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Grand Yankee
Vessel Model: 1981 49' Grand Banks Classic
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 326
New marina being built in Wilmington down town. Many areas to choose from. Great city with everything you need. The less you have to take care of the more time you will have for each other. Plus no weeds, no lawn. The extra money you save can be used for LeBoat vacation on Europe canals. Dinner at the Bridge Tender. Houses collect to much STUFF that you only keep because you have the room to store it. The vessel forces you to get rid of the STUFF you really do not need. We all tend to carry to much Baggage thru life. I remember a nice 53' Hatteras for sale by Bluewater. Good luck.
Ron T is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 04:20 PM   #10
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,515
4) some insurers may not appreciate wood

Many boat yards will refuse to haul any wooden boat with out a huge deposit , $10,000 or similar as after haul many are just walked away from , and disposal with a match is no longer legal.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 07:45 PM   #11
Ben
Guru
 
Ben's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: US
Vessel Name: Sand Castle
Vessel Model: 1986 MT Sundeck 35.5
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 693
Long story short - talked to the broker on THAT boat. It needs a lot of work he says and the pictures are at least 3 years old. It's on the hard and needs a lot of love. Current owner has had a drop in health and has not been able to keep it up.

There's always a "rest of the story" and that's it. I may still look, but my bubble has burst on that particular boat...
__________________
..................................
Ben

MV Sand Castle
Wilmington, NC
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 07:51 PM   #12
THD
Guru
 
City: Seattle
Country: US
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,142
Ben-the bubble may have burst on that boat, but it still floats for the liveaboard idea! Any chance you can sublet your slip in Oriental? There is usually a pretty good demand up there for slips.
THD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 08:20 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
rjtrane's Avatar
 
City: Palmetto Bay
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sunshine
Vessel Model: Island Pilot DSe 12m Hybrid
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 268
What triggered living aboard? My wife and I watched a movie with John and Haley Mills, "The Truth About Spring." Father and daughter were living aboard a sailboat in the Caribbean. At the end, my wife and I looked at each other - a glint in our eyes - and the decision was made.

Best thing? The Dinner Key community - weekends sailing in the keys - trips to the Bahamas - and best of all, our first born was conceived on board and spent the first year of his life as a liveaboard.

Worst? A bit cramped with an infant and subsequently a toddler.

We moved shoreside due to relocating in NYC.

I say go for it!
__________________
Reuben Trane
"Sunshine" - Island Pilot DSe 12m
rjtrane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 09:01 PM   #14
Guru
 
READY2GO's Avatar
 
City: Marathon, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Walkabout
Vessel Model: 1989 Sea Ray 380 Aft Cabin
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 521
"My question is, what event turned the corner for you as a live aboard? What's the worst thing and the best thing about it? If a couple, who drove the idea and who had to be convinced?"

Mine was actually a series of events. Within a three year period, one bad motorcycle accident, one heart attack, one bad truck accident, and bladder cancer. I decided that if I wanted to do something fun and adventurous that I had better get to doing it. My wife jumped on baord with both feet. It has been the best thing for our lives and for our marrige. We are much closer now than I think we have ever been. Being togather in close quarters makes you work togather.
__________________
"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." Mark Twain

www.mikeandsharondunsworth.blogspot.com
READY2GO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 10:33 PM   #15
Ben
Guru
 
Ben's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: US
Vessel Name: Sand Castle
Vessel Model: 1986 MT Sundeck 35.5
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 693
OK, so here's the sum up...

1. I'd still like to see the boat, if just for curiosity.

2. First day at work in Wilmington. Wow. Over-stimulated.
2a. Wilmington has many picturesque parts.
2b. Wilmington has many industrial tank farms.
2c. Can I go through this town with only one eye open?

3. I can move the Marine Trader to Wilmington, and will, but no hurry - first got to make sure selling current home/wife/new job and all work out properly.

4. Live aboard not out of the question whatsoever with the right boat.

5. I still have to report to work in reasonably un-sweaty business clothes in a climate with 90% humidity for half the year, 95% the other half. So, living aboard the Marine Trader - I am not sure the AC could take the long term continuous use. The size might be too small for us in our current routine.

6. Saw Joyner Marina. Very nice location. Right at Snows Cut on the ICW. 15 miles from town. That beats 120+, which is our current weekend trek.

Mike - thank you for your story and you have an outrageously good blog. I have a Lehman too, so I will likely cyber-stalk your blog for a while. I really like the work you did with your stuffing box, since I need to do the same. You showed it to be pretty easy. I like.
__________________
..................................
Ben

MV Sand Castle
Wilmington, NC
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-17-2013, 10:42 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: NONE
Vessel Model: NONE
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 435
That is one of the most beautiful boats I have ever seen, if it wasn't wood I would buy it in a heartbeat. The equipment on it alone is worth more than the asking price. Sadly however, this is not a wood boat built with the latest in materials and construction techniques, it is an old plywood hull that has been glassed to the waterline to keep it afloat. As a "survivor" of the wood boat era I can tell you it doesn't work long. Many tried it in the 60's and at best it bought a few years but putting glass over wood that is not absolutely sealed can't help but end in disaster. There is simply no way to keep water from getting into the ply on the inside and there it lies trapped between the glass and ply, the resulting rot is unstoppable. Unfortunately whoever buys this masterpiece is in for a world of grief and or expense.
Capt Kangeroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 11:14 AM   #17
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
My questions are,

What event turned the corner for you as a live aboard?

We bought to big of a boat, and did not need the house as the children moved out. So we were planning on down sizing anyway to a condo! We spent time, and money fixing/upgrading the boat, and being a live aboard fit our live style.


What's the worst thing and the best thing about it?

The worst thing was coming to grips that a live aboard is at the mercy of the marina. A live aboard does not have the same right as living on land and marinas can give you a 30 day notice to vacate. We and most live a boards have been giving 30 day notices.

The best thing as being a live a board, The diversity of the people, not having to keep up a pretense, we can be ourselves, and not having to keep up with the Jones. This is the reason we bought the Eagle and been a live aboard for so long. Also the time with the our children and grandchildren when they come to live with us and/or the summer with us. Priceless!

If a couple, who drove the idea and who had to be convinced?

I had to be convinced as my wife is a county girl and open to new ideas, reasonable comforts, and wanted to have a place to crash down town Seattle. But of course the maintenance, and responsibility was mine, so my view point is/was a bit different. We did not have a goal to be a live aboard, and did not push it. It just happened.

My wife, one might say is "girly". She likes the pleasant side of boating, but not the grungy side. Still, she'll work her fingers to the bone to make sure something's clean though, and this boat looks like a home. She wants a home, and shes willing to see this for fun. Both of us are because its convenient. Living aboard probably won't happen, but stranger things...

Between my wife and I am probable the most girly, so we both like nice, pretty things and plenty of creature comforts. Usually its the female that moves off the boat in our case it will probable be me.

To be a long term live aboard there has to be a underlying want/need besides it might be nice to be a live aboard. Being a live aboard is not as easy/glamour as most people thing. A large % do not make it thru the first year, the vast majority 2 to 5 years, and then there is a very small % long term. Make sure the boat has the size capacity creature comforts required and make sure you have the funds as being a live aboard is eqaul and in some respects more than living on land.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 11:58 AM   #18
Guru
 
READY2GO's Avatar
 
City: Marathon, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Walkabout
Vessel Model: 1989 Sea Ray 380 Aft Cabin
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 521
"Mike - thank you for your story and you have an outrageously good blog. I have a Lehman too, so I will likely cyber-stalk your blog for a while. I really like the work you did with your stuffing box, since I need to do the same. You showed it to be pretty easy. I like. "


Thanks Ben, stalk awy.

I for got to answer the best and worst question.

Best: The closeness you develop with your spouse and the freedom.

Worst: Rebuilding the head.

One very nice thing about living aboard is that it is easy to move and take your house with you. Nothing to sell (and pay a hefty commission on). No moving furniture. Just throw off the dock lines and go someplace else. We did this two months ago and are about to do it again this week. Oddly to the same area we last left.

I am to the point that if you know who on the dock doesn't like who and why you have stayed too long. Time to untie and move along.
__________________
"Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." Mark Twain

www.mikeandsharondunsworth.blogspot.com
READY2GO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 12:17 PM   #19
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,848
Quote:
Originally Posted by READY2GO View Post

I am to the point that if you know who on the dock doesn't like who and why you have stayed too long. Time to untie and move along.
That's a good rule. We don't stay in a marina long enough to get involved in the politics of the dock or deeply into the livaboard community. That's not why we boat. Probably the best part of marina life on the ICW is talking with the in transit cruisers about their experiences along the way. If they have been someplace we are interested in I will buy the drinks or dinner if necessary to hear that.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-18-2013, 01:28 PM   #20
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Kangeroo View Post
That is one of the most beautiful boats I have ever seen, if it wasn't wood I would buy it in a heartbeat. The equipment on it alone is worth more than the asking price. Sadly however, this is not a wood boat built with the latest in materials and construction techniques, it is an old plywood hull that has been glassed to the waterline to keep it afloat. As a "survivor" of the wood boat era I can tell you it doesn't work long. Many tried it in the 60's and at best it bought a few years but putting glass over wood that is not absolutely sealed can't help but end in disaster. There is simply no way to keep water from getting into the ply on the inside and there it lies trapped between the glass and ply, the resulting rot is unstoppable. Unfortunately whoever buys this masterpiece is in for a world of grief and or expense.
From the listing..."Construction
Commercially Constructed by the Gillikins of Harkers Island. Mystic is built similar to most of the time tested high end North Carolina Sport Fishing Boats; she is a Wood/Glass Composite. The Hull is Striped Planked 1 X 7" Juniper with 3/8" glass under the waterline. "

Which is typical of many Carolina high end sportfish. Don't take too many TF posts seriously.

While I have seen bad examples of this construction...there are plenty of jewels made the Harkers Island way.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012