Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-01-2013, 01:03 PM   #61
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Am in the assistance towing business...boats that get used weekly break down far less than the sporadically used. Especially gas boats now with ethanol fuel.
__________________
Advertisement

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2013, 01:22 PM   #62
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
It depends on what you mean used! This discussion is under the Live A board heading, so the originator had the idea of living on the boat. It may not leaving the dock more than non life aboard boats but it will get used. Since somebody is on the boat most of the time it will probable be taken better cared for. Being a live a board requires a reasonable size and capable boat but the moorage fee can be justified because they live on it, just like justifying living on land. So I think the discussion has wandered from the original intent.

I could not justify owing the Eagel if we did not live on it!
__________________

Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2013, 01:34 PM   #63
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Most all systems benefit from being used, monitored and repaired or "pickled" IAW manufacture's recommendations.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2013, 03:01 PM   #64
Guru
 
Capthead's Avatar
 
City: Long Beach, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Heads Up
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 950
I think the ethanol in the gas gives it a shorter life span. I could be wrong, but another problem is ethanol absorbs water and after it has absorbed all it can, it will dump the water and then you have water and gas to deal with.

Owning a gas boat today is certainly more work to keep everything working well, in my opinion.

Living aboard a boat and smelling gas fumes, not good too.
Capthead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2013, 07:35 AM   #65
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
Since somebody is on the boat most of the time it will probable be taken better cared for.

But usually far harder on the engines.

As there always is a "chance" the boat will actually be operated , the engine is seldom pickled .

Then someone runs it for a few minuets a month till its finally been killed in place.

The fact that maint is REQUIRED on calender time OR engine hours is also easily ignored, making an old live a board a very iffy purchase.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 04:06 PM   #66
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben View Post
Ok, so I went and saw the actual boat. A little rough actually, and I could not get inside. Would I live aboard? Sure, why not. But that call is a little far off just yet, but maybe if we sell the house fast well have a plan...
Just happen to be reading thru this subject thread, and was about to ask if you ever went to see the boat.

Couple of questions:
1) Why didn't you get to see the inside,...or was it that you just wanted to explore the outside before making any appt to see the inside?
2) Looks like rot on the overhead in photo #2, I imagine that came from water entering that exterior fitting that appears to anchor some sort of mast stay?
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 04:39 PM   #67
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Polyurea Coatings & Dragon Shield

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Kangeroo View Post
....
Kidding aside, if you bought this for 40K, did cosmetic repairs only, then took it out and sunk it in 10 years your capital cost would only have been 4K a year. That is a fraction of what you would loose in depreciation on a new boat. If you stripped her and sold off all the equipment before you sunk it you could probably drop the capital cost to 2K per year. hmmmm.. where did you say this gorgeous vessel was located?
If it were a queston as to how long she might remain afloat, I would give serious onsideration to these relatively new Polyurea coatings. Could make this vessel float for a long time.

1) #


2) polyurea hull coating "Dragon Shield" works as a blast shield and also on boats


3) K5#
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2013, 08:27 PM   #68
Ben
Guru
 
Ben's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: US
Vessel Name: Sand Castle
Vessel Model: 1986 MT Sundeck 35.5
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 693
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian eiland View Post
Just happen to be reading thru this subject thread, and was about to ask if you ever went to see the boat.

Couple of questions:
1) Why didn't you get to see the inside,...or was it that you just wanted to explore the outside before making any appt to see the inside?
2) Looks like rot on the overhead in photo #2, I imagine that came from water entering that exterior fitting that appears to anchor some sort of mast stay?
After hours at the boatyard. Casual visit. No broker. Climbing aboard would be trespassing. Plus even a look up a scaffold or ladder not easy because none was available. Saw enough. Would have liked to see inside, but to no end.
__________________
..................................
Ben

MV Sand Castle
Wilmington, NC
Ben is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2014, 03:07 PM   #69
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Dragon Shield, Polyurea

Quote:
Originally Posted by brian eiland View Post
If it were a queston as to how long she might remain afloat, I would give serious onsideration to these relatively new Polyurea coatings. Could make this vessel float for a long time.

1) #


2) polyurea hull coating "Dragon Shield" works as a blast shield and also on boats


3) K5#

Just looking back thru a few subject threads, and ran across this one I had posted. I'm surprised that no one made further comments on this Dragon Shield product.
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2014, 09:26 PM   #70
Member
 
City: New Orleans
Country: USA
Vessel Name: happyours
Vessel Model: Whitcraft50
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 6
I to am in love with Mistic

Why not roof tar 1/2 plywood to bottom four times for 1" new hull and 2 time to sides up to rubrail. Then seal with new poly's and finish for slick look. Thats a new hull not needing frame support.

The broker told me the deck supports are the problem, so re-wood and ply the decks.

Not my idea, Butchler's book on boatbuilding recommends this approach.

While we're at it, get rid of the 892 and putin a 6BT cummings. Hope the trans is 3 to 1.

Hells bells, I'm 70 and if the old girl sinks in 15 to 20 years, I've had a hell of a ride.
kingfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2014, 10:38 AM   #71
Senior Member
 
TONTOROSS's Avatar
 
City: Portland, OR
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cool Water
Vessel Model: C&L Puget Trawler
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 252
Brian - any idea what this stuff weights? If the hull is sound, would is not be a good idea to apply it to the bow, to help protect the boat if you struck an object at sea or even docking. Another thought, can a gel coat be applied over it? Again, weight.
TONTOROSS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2014, 10:38 AM   #72
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Quote:
Originally Posted by TONTOROSS View Post
Brian - any idea what this stuff weights?
Sorry, I don't know,..but I suspect it may be close to neutral buoyancy ?


Quote:
If the hull is sound, would is not be a good idea to apply it to the bow, to help protect the boat if you struck an object at sea or even docking.
I'm not so sure I would apply it to a 'sound hull' unless there were special circumstances under which the vessel would be operated.

Quote:
Another thought, can a gel coat be applied over it? Again, weight.
I am quite sure that gel coat COULD NOT be applied over it.
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2014, 11:41 AM   #73
Guru
 
Mule's Avatar
 
City: Fort Pierce
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Florita Ann
Vessel Model: 1982 Present
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 1,784
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingfish View Post
Why not roof tar 1/2 plywood to bottom four times for 1" new hull and 2 time to sides up to rubrail. Then seal with new poly's and finish for slick look. Thats a new hull not needing frame support.

The broker told me the deck supports are the problem, so re-wood and ply the decks.

Not my idea, Butchler's book on boatbuilding recommends this approach.

While we're at it, get rid of the 892 and putin a 6BT cummings. Hope the trans is 3 to 1.

Hells bells, I'm 70 and if the old girl sinks in 15 to 20 years, I've had a hell of a ride.
I read Buhlers book, and I was fascinated with the roof tar and ply approach. I cannot recall if it was 1/8, 3/16 or 1/4 inch ply but I do know it was not 1/2, weight would be a consideration. He used 2 layers with no seams on top of another. Roof cement, plywood sheath bent around the curves, more roof tar, another layer of ply then resin, cloth, resin, resin. Good for a lot more years.But you are dead on, that technique is very workable for a wooden boat that cannot be refastened again.
__________________

Mule is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012