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Old 02-07-2012, 06:36 AM   #21
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RE: Livaboard Longevity

I am 65 and wife is 71. We live aboard our sailboat and we are looking to buy a trawler and move inland. We will continue to live aboard and have not yet given any thought to 'how much longer'.

Wife actually contributes her good health to living aboard. She says it's the climbing in and out of cabin and on and off os boat. We also do a lot more waking than when we were land lubbers.

Currently living aboard about 13 years or so.
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Old 02-07-2012, 09:44 AM   #22
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RE: Livaboard Longevity

Ahoy Tony B,

Your plans have a familiar ring to it, I was going to seek a shore side facility this summer, just after I get to year number 30.* Perhaps we might be able to assist each other.* I have a 1988 36 ft Kadey-Krogen Manatee on the market, email*me at captjoe60@aol.com we can share a few stories.

Ciao, Capt Joe

*

*
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:20 PM   #23
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RE: Livaboard Longevity

On January 27, I turned 64.* My wife turns 64 October 17, so she is younger than I am and does she let me know it until her birthday.* The only thing that is keeping me from retiring is when we both reach 65 and can get on Medicare.
*

Our Condo renters just called and gave notice, so we are going to sell the condo.* I figure what we get for it will pay off what we own, so we will have no ties to land and NO DEBT.
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Old 03-29-2012, 02:06 AM   #24
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RE: Livaboard Longevity

We have an old friend who still living on board of small and unconfortable boat at 85 . He is living on his boat last boat since 1987 .
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Old 04-13-2012, 03:46 PM   #25
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I'm 67 so to 68

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We have an old friend who still living on board of small and unconfortable boat at 85 . He is living on his boat last boat since 1987 .
I'm hoping to keep boating for a great deal longer as I'm just having too much fun. After 66 years on land I'm just starting to live the life and lovin it with the exception no garage to just walk into after dinner and tinker. I have a rolling shop but it's not always close at hand and I do miss my big stationary tools.
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Old 04-14-2012, 07:07 AM   #26
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For the live aboard wannabee the first year will be the biggest learnig curve and hardest hit to the wallet.

This is esp true for folks that live where it gets cold , below freezing 3-4 months of winter.

No sweat in MIA with no air cond in August , there is still sunshades or fans.

But at 0deg F with out reliable heat , preferably that requires no electric. one can be dead , or attempting to keep afloat a very cold sinking home .

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Old 04-14-2012, 11:00 AM   #27
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This is especially true for boats with 30amp shore power

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For the live aboard wannabee the first year will be the biggest learnig curve and hardest hit to the wallet.

This is esp true for folks that live where it gets cold , below freezing 3-4 months of winter.

No sweat in MIA with no air cond in August , there is still sunshades or fans.

But at 0deg F with out reliable heat , preferably that requires no electric. one can be dead , or attempting to keep afloat a very cold sinking home .

FF
How many boats burn up with multiple electric heaters struggling to heat a poorly insulated boat. It surprises me when people expect what is the equivalent to a single extension cord to heat the what's effectively a small home. When I rented my birth the first thing I did was rewire the dock to bring in a 240 volt 60amp circuit dedicated to my boat. Of course a the dock owner asked for meter as well. That was a couple of thousand right out of the box. I just rewired a Albin 39 that a woman had bought to live aboard in the Bay Area. Single 30amp service, no GFI circuits, all switchs and outlets mounted in cut out openings in panel or cabinets, Ac electrical power with reversed neutrals, Breakers switched the neutrals instead of the hot legs, This was all hidden cost to living aboard that was discovered when she couldn't run a couple of portable heaters and the hard wired with solid copper romex connected battery charger failed to maintain her house batteries.
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Old 04-15-2012, 07:07 AM   #28
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Electric heat is not suitable for actual cold weather.

If normal above freezing temps do not put the engine and plumbing at risk, a local electrical supply problem for a week or two is of no concern .

At =20F and below the boat can freeze and sink in a single night.

And +20F is hardly real cold, probably seen as far south as JAX FL on rare winters.

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Old 09-20-2012, 04:05 PM   #29
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Wendy and I have been doing it on the same boat since 1982.
I am sixty and we intend to stay onboard the boat as long as I can haul up on a line.
I just don't think I can live as healthy physically or mentally in any other place than on the water.
When I become a hazard to the boat, others on the water, my mate or myself, I hope I will know to get off....
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Old 09-20-2012, 04:23 PM   #30
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Quote:
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This is esp true for folks that live where it gets cold , below freezing 3-4 months of winter.
But at 0deg F with out reliable heat , preferably that requires no electric. one can be dead
FF
We have been up for a few years now in the Great White North. We have seen as low -20 (below) farenheit and were frozen solid into the ice.
Have two 30 Amps coming on board and a diesel heat as well. Love it! The winds blow and the snow falls so the decks need shoveling off in the morning just to get out the door. Very healthy living.
We are currently on Pigeon Lake at 4434'.492N / 07830'.395
This image was taken on Lake Simcoe, which is part of the Trent Severn Waterway

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Old 09-20-2012, 06:09 PM   #31
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More power to you Capt. Joe. Approximate same Latitude as you (N 44 13' 26.23", W 68 40' 39.16"). No one I know lives on their boat in the winter around here. No marinas to plug into for power if you stay in the water as the few marinas that do exist take their floats out for the winter. Moorings are the rule here and I can't imagine trying to winter over as a liveaboard on a mooring at this Lat.
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Old 09-20-2012, 06:11 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Capt. Joe View Post
We have been up for a few years now in the Great White North. We have seen as low -20 (below) farenheit and were frozen solid into the ice.
Have two 30 Amps coming on board and a diesel heat as well. Love it! The winds blow and the snow falls so the decks need shoveling off in the morning just to get out the door. Very healthy living.
We are currently on Pigeon Lake at 4434'.492N / 07830'.395
This image was taken on Lake Simcoe, which is part of the Trent Severn Waterway

dude you have the boat for it! Nice looking vessel! very salty looking. I'd love to see more pictures.
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Old 09-20-2012, 08:15 PM   #33
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I guess the reason for moving aboard might determine how long you'd be able to make it work?
If you just want a boat instead of a house in southern climates, pick a marina next to shopping and a hospital and you're golden with the right boat and an electric scooter. If you want to cruise to foreign ports, you're on the other end of the scale. If you want to cruise protected waters, longevity will depend on how your boat is equipped. If you're like me and want to spend weeks (or months) on protected waters from one coast to the other, maybe a trailerable houseboat and a small house are the ticket?

On the water or on the road, Big Duck is our home away from home and provides all the comforts including weeklong visits with family on Lake Powell.
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Old 09-20-2012, 11:45 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt. Joe View Post
We have been up for a few years now in the Great White North. We have seen as low -20 (below) farenheit and were frozen solid into the ice.
Have two 30 Amps coming on board and a diesel heat as well. Love it! The winds blow and the snow falls so the decks need shoveling off in the morning just to get out the door. Very healthy living.
We are currently on Pigeon Lake at 4434'.492N / 07830'.395
This image was taken on Lake Simcoe, which is part of the Trent Severn Waterway


If you see a jolly ole fellow up there by the name of Peter,tell him ben2go says hello and the LPBC is going well.He'll be on his boat "Turtle Bay" it's his creation based on Phil Bolger's Windermere.


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Old 09-21-2012, 05:54 AM   #35
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For folks contemplating a real winter aboard , remember "snow shoveling" is usually done with a broom.

After living aboard and being active , a 2 story house might be of more interest than a flat dirt house
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:41 PM   #36
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More power to you Capt. Joe. Approximate same Latitude as you (N 44 13' 26.23", W 68 40' 39.16"). No one I know lives on their boat in the winter around here. No marinas to plug into for power if you stay in the water as the few marinas that do exist take their floats out for the winter. Moorings are the rule here and I can't imagine trying to winter over as a liveaboard on a mooring at this Lat.
We were lucky to find this spot.
No, the only place to do it on a mooring is in the south. Boot Key Harbor was great for that. We spent the nineties on our own mooring that we put down.
Hundreds live aboard in Toronto and we were there for a few years but wanted so much to get away from the big smoke and go north. Most marinas close down north of Toronto and the owners head south so they don't want the liability and hassle of having boats afloat in the winter.
I have dealt with the managers of the place where we are now in my business in the past and we became friends. We have the place to ourselves after haul-out and it is like paradise. We are on a dead-end road with a half of dozen residences. Really quiet but only 5 minutes out of the town of Bobcaygeon, which is Lock 32 on the Trent Severn Waterway.
We make a point of being green; composting incinerating heads and we have a watermaker. So the only thing we need from the marina is shorepower. We have two gensets in case hydro goes out and diesel heat.
Right now wild turkeys roam about on our lawn and deer graze in the back of the marina. Even the odd moose. We have started to haul our garbage can up in a tree because there is a mamma bear with a cub around, looking to fat up for the winter hibernation. Coyotes howl at night.
After the bay freezes over, sometimes packs of wolves are seen crossing over. Bunch vent right under our bow last year, which was our first winter up here. We saw them first in our webcam archives and then caught them a few times in the early morning.

Not much ice movement, so it is fairly safe. There is another 100' and a 65' houseboat in the marina but they don't live aboard. Can't haul them out, so they stay in and bubble.

I'm just thrilled with all this for now. After spending two decades in the tropics, the change of seasons is much enjoyable....
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Old 09-21-2012, 01:52 PM   #37
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dude you have the boat for it! Nice looking vessel! very salty looking. I'd love to see more pictures.
Thank You Pineapple Girl - lots of pictures on our boat blog: http://www.cruisingdog.com

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Old 09-21-2012, 03:00 PM   #38
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Quote:
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Thank You Pineapple Girl - lots of pictures on our boat blog: http://www.cruisingdog.com

Very cool thanks joe.
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Old 10-02-2012, 03:35 PM   #39
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One of my dock neighbors, Tim, has been living onboard his 34' sailboat since 1979. He turns 90 on November 6th, and is currently single handing his boat, crusing the San Juan and Gulf Islands.

He is a spry and agile as somebody half his age, and a genuine gentleman to boot.
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Old 10-21-2012, 07:53 PM   #40
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All I have to offer is that while wintering over in a marina in Kemer, Southern Turkey we all came out one afternoon to help a new arrival dock. It was a liveaboard couple, aged 80+ who, after engine failure and consequent electrical failure, had sailed their 28' sailboat several hundred miles from Cyprus or beyond. They are an ordinary couple with an extraordinary commitment. He was beginning to suffer from the beginning signs of dementia and this was perhaps the beginning of the end of their adventure. But the message is if you are healthy enough to live "at home" you are healthy enough to live on a boat.
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