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Old 09-05-2014, 06:38 PM   #1
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How many bedrooms are required?

One debate my wife and I always have looking at our next boat is the number of required bedrooms required. On our last boat we had one OSR and the previous two boats we had two bedrooms. During the time we stayed aboard we never had anyone spend the night and the boats worked fine. On our next boat we agreed one large OSR was more practical then a smaller OSR to make room for a second smaller bedroom which would turn into a storage room. We also decided to have a portable salon table built in case someone did spend the night aboard they could sleep on the large sofa with easy access to the day head off the salon.

Just curious how others view this aspect (bedrooms) of their boat layout, what works and what doesn't. thanks
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Old 09-05-2014, 06:43 PM   #2
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How does that saying go? Parties 10, feed 4, sleeps 2?

When we have Grand Kids over, they tend to crash about anywhere, 'bedrooms' or not. . . .
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Old 09-05-2014, 06:55 PM   #3
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The admiral says two with two baths, so she can invite another couple from time to time.
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Old 09-05-2014, 07:24 PM   #4
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Our "ideal" boat will entertain 6, feed 4 and sleep 2 conveniently. Guests can accommodate into what's left or get a room ashore. As stated above kids nest anywhere...

A decadent couples cruiser is how our broker we where working with described our choice.
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Old 09-05-2014, 07:43 PM   #5
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Drinks for six, dinner for four, sleeping for two. My boat is 31' long if I'm bragging, 28' long if I'm paying for dockage. It's technically possible to convert the table to sleep two more people but we would have to all be really good friends.

Really, it depends on your needs, not somebody else's needs. If you often have more than two people aboard you would want sleeping quarters for them. That might mean buying a larger boat.
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Old 09-05-2014, 07:46 PM   #6
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My 48 sporty has a very nice OSR, with private bathroom/shower and queen bed. 2 bunks to port and 2 bunks in the fwd v, all large single size. Guest bathroom/shower is large and well appointed. All have seperate zoned AC and heat. My mattress is 6 inches of pure luxury, the "bunks" are all 3 inches of barely adequate. Fish and guests start to stink after a few days !!!!
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Old 09-05-2014, 07:57 PM   #7
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We have a master stateroom aft with a head and shower and a stateroom forward with a head. In between is the main cabin which has a drop-down table that converts the L-settee to a double berth, although we've never used it.

We think the tri-cabin arrangement in a smaller (30-40) foot boat is ideal as far as having guests is concerned because we and they have our own compartments with heads and neutral ground in between. So we or the guests can get up, make coffee, read, whatever, without disturbing the others.
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Old 09-05-2014, 07:58 PM   #8
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... the "bunks" are all 3 inches of barely adequate.
a.k.a. "4-day foam"
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:10 PM   #9
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As long as you are willing to live with people occupying "temporary sleeping quarters" such as the saloon...then one stateroom is fine.

Most people will tell you kids/grandkids sleep just as well on the floor or flying bridge as anyplace so just a decent fold out in the saloon for their parents/adults usually takes care of things.

But if you are the type to occasionally take another couple up in their years...another stateroom with private or semi-private head seems to be the way to go based on most of the cruisers I have discussed it with. And another vote for the tri-cabin arrangement.
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:32 PM   #10
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We have two cabins, two heads. The second cabin had bunk beds but the PO cut the top one back to a bookshelf and the lower bunk is like a super twin. We expect my mother in law to cruise with us sometimes and this will work perfect. If another couple joins us they will likely sleep in the saloon. We will have a curtain that closes off the saloon from the galley, helm and forward cabins and heads.
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Old 09-05-2014, 10:50 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by N4061 View Post
One debate my wife and I always have looking at our next boat is the number of required bedrooms required. On our last boat we had one OSR and the previous two boats we had two bedrooms. During the time we stayed aboard we never had anyone spend the night and the boats worked fine. On our next boat we agreed one large OSR was more practical then a smaller OSR to make room for a second smaller bedroom which would turn into a storage room. We also decided to have a portable salon table built in case someone did spend the night aboard they could sleep on the large sofa with easy access to the day head off the salon.

Just curious how others view this aspect (bedrooms) of their boat layout, what works and what doesn't. thanks
If you've never had anyone stay aboard and nothing significant has changed then one sounds fine. Now, for that off time that someone else stays, I encourage an air mattress or air mattresses. They take up very little space but the good ones are actually very comfortable just placed on a floor or table or whatever.
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Old 09-05-2014, 11:57 PM   #12
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If you've never had anyone stay aboard and nothing significant has changed then one sounds fine. Now, for that off time that someone else stays, I encourage an air mattress or air mattresses. They take up very little space but the good ones are actually very comfortable just placed on a floor or table or whatever.

And after one night they won't want to stay a second!


I couldn't imagine not having a second stateroom ..
(boats have staterooms not bedrooms) for occasional guests overnight.. We love to share the boating thing with friends..and to use as a storage space for cushions, chairs, and overflow stuff.

HOLLYWOOD
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Old 09-06-2014, 12:06 AM   #13
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And after one night they won't want to stay a second!


I couldn't imagine not having a second stateroom ..
(boats have staterooms not bedrooms) for occasional guests overnight.. We love to share the boating thing with friends..and to use as a storage space for cushions, chairs, and overflow stuff.

HOLLYWOOD
But this isn't for you, it's for him. And he said they'd never had overnight guests. We always have a boat full. Now my real thought was if he had guests, they would get the stateroom and he would be on the air mattress. And the quality air mattresses are quite comfortable.
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Old 09-06-2014, 12:12 AM   #14
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But this isn't for you, it's for him. And he said they'd never had overnight guests. We always have a boat full. Now my real thought was if he had guests, they would get the stateroom and he would be on the air mattress. And the quality air mattresses are quite comfortable.

Yep.. Just what everybody wants to hear...

Welcome aboard our Yacht.. " here is you air mattress "!

HOLLYWOOD
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Old 09-06-2014, 12:24 AM   #15
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Yep.. Just what everybody wants to hear...

Welcome aboard our Yacht.. " here is you air mattress "!

HOLLYWOOD
No the owners take the air mattress, but are you missing the part where he claims they've never had overnight guests?

And compared to someone's 3" mattress an 8" air mattress is great.
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Old 09-06-2014, 02:08 AM   #16
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Personally I like having three bedrooms and two baths.

But that's because of how we use our boat, and how we intend to use it as time goes on.

We use the third bedroom for storage most of the time. It has bunk beds and they make a great place to stash stuff.

The second bedroom gets used fairly frequently with guests. Certainly not all the time or even most of the time but it does get used.

I cannot fathom having a large boat and not being able to accommodate a guest and let them have heir own stateroom.
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Old 09-06-2014, 07:55 AM   #17
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Just posted something the other day on another forum on the subject, so here's a little cu and paste on how we, for our personal situation, went about it. This was for a full time liveaboard (no home on land) full time cruising scenario:

Have you evaluated how much you really expect the forward stateroom to be used? Not wanting to clutter the ERs or generator room (which I used for a lot of storage already) any further, we used the forward SR drawers and cabinets, and a fair amount of the bunks, for tool storage as well as Ann's silver and china and similar stuff. The forward shower was used to store ironing board, vacuum, Shark steam mop and misc other cleaning supplies. On the few occasions when that SR was going to have someone sleeping in it, we were able to do a little rearranging for a few days worth of stay. I have seen boats where the forward SR and shower were permanently turned into office and storage space.

The typical scenario for us was one couple or guest at a time. But we had just a few times when both of our adult kids visited, or we had two other couples on board. So three SR, 3 bath boat made sense for us. Since we have officially swallowed the anchor and in the future will be more typical vacation/weekend boaters, a one, maybe two SR boat makes much more sense as we won't need anything remotely near as much storage nor will it be our home that family and guests are visiting.

Remember, the definition of cruising is "fixing your boat in exotic places", boy was it nice being almost entirely self sufficient while living in luxury.
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Old 09-06-2014, 08:34 AM   #18
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Old 09-06-2014, 08:53 AM   #19
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N4061

You mention never having used the second stateroom when you had one, so a one-stateroom boat should be fine. That said, I would also consider resale when making the choice. If a boat is 35' or less, I don't think prospective buyers will mind so much a one-stateroom boat - but if bigger, I think they would like to see more than just one stateroom. I know I would.
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Old 09-06-2014, 09:04 AM   #20
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IMO the owners sr should not be in the bow and should have at least areal queen sized island bed
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