Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-08-2017, 05:11 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Dubnuh's Avatar
 
City: Portland
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 108
Greetings fine folks

This is most likely a common gripe for liveaboard boaters, but can anyone tell me why I cannot find any area marinas (Portland, OR) willing to take liveaboards? I'm assuming it's because they don't want the types who cannot afford to keep up with boat maintenance, or use the dock as their tool shed or just plain can't keep from drying laundry on the boom. I would rent my house and buy a KK or Selene in a jiffy if I could liveaboard and still commute to the office. Maybe I'm wrong, and if so please tell me!
Signed,
Landlocked in PDX
__________________
Advertisement

Dubnuh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 06:05 PM   #2
Veteran Member
 
City: Oregon
Country: USA
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 26
I think McCuddy's Landing in Scappoose will let you live aboard. I know they have several there, but not sure if they are allowing any new ones.
__________________

Timeoff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 06:16 PM   #3
Guru
 
rochepoint's Avatar
 
City: Sidney BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: RochePoint
Vessel Model: 1985 Cheer Men PT38 Sedan
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,449
A Google search turned up this: mccuddysmarina.com
__________________
Cheers Mike Barge
RochePoint
Sidney, British Columbia
Yes, I have my "AnchorRight"
rochepoint is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 10:41 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Dubnuh's Avatar
 
City: Portland
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 108
Thank you both. I'll be calling them tomorrow.
Dubnuh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 06:31 AM   #5
TF Site Team
 
dimer2's Avatar
 
City: Cameron, La
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Baobab
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,653
I have lived in several marinas that will always say no to someone calling, for all the reasons you stated above. They simply have no idea who they are talking to. Try going in person to McCuddy's (you probably want to look at their facilities anyway).

They see a nicely dressed, honest looking guy, there may suddenly be an opening.
dimer2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 07:22 AM   #6
Guru
 
Donna's Avatar
 
City: Palm Coast
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Southerly
Vessel Model: 1986 Marine Trader 36' Sundeck
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 1,025
Dimer is so right. The marina I am currently at said no live aboards. It is a premier resort. I signed a year contract and quickly found out that most marinas put in a live aboard clause. We have several live aboards. To access ammenitys you need a card. They were giving me a card that needed to be renewed every 6 weeks or so, UNTIL they saw I was spending a few thousand dollars a month at the resort and last month topped off 20 grand. (daughters wedding). I now have a few cards that were delivered to my boat and expire long after my slip contract does.

The moral of the story is, they do not want anyone disruptive so they just say no to live aboards. Its kind of a prove yourself thing. I moved on to my boat while my house was being repaired from hurricane damage.

There are quite a few live aboards at my marina, but there have also been a few asked to leave.
Donna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 08:20 AM   #7
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna View Post
Dimer is so right. The marina I am currently at said no live aboards. It is a premier resort. I signed a year contract and quickly found out that most marinas put in a live aboard clause. We have several live aboards. To access ammenitys you need a card. They were giving me a card that needed to be renewed every 6 weeks or so, UNTIL they saw I was spending a few thousand dollars a month at the resort and last month topped off 20 grand. (daughters wedding). I now have a few cards that were delivered to my boat and expire long after my slip contract does.

The moral of the story is, they do not want anyone disruptive so they just say no to live aboards. Its kind of a prove yourself thing. I moved on to my boat while my house was being repaired from hurricane damage.

There are quite a few live aboards at my marina, but there have also been a few asked to leave.
Wifey B: Love your marina and did see liveaboards there, all nice, clean boats, helpful, watchful. There was a small complex of duplexes near us in NC in a wooded residential area. No one knew they existed. No signs, all word of mouth. Some people had lived there 15-20 years. The owner lived there and the manager. Some people got on the waiting list and were told it was at least 5 years, never got called. Then we knew someone who went over at lunch, met the manager who was cleaning the pool and got a call about an available apartment opening soon about a week later. Just was told if anyone asked to say he'd been on the waiting list for years. Highly illegal the way they did it.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 10:14 AM   #8
Guru
 
kthoennes's Avatar
 
City: Sioux Falls, South Dakota
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Xanadu
Vessel Model: Mainship 37 Motor Yacht
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,014
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
...Highly illegal the way they did it.
I'll bet lots of marinas are - well, flexible with waiting lists. We were on a waiting list ourselves for a while and here that list is really critical -- our marina is the only one that handles big(ger) boats for hundreds of miles around, so if you don't get in you're pretty much out of luck. From a business point of view though I can understand and swallow the flexibility. For example when we bought our bigger boat we needed a bigger slip (like immediately) and fortunately they gave us a bigger slip reassignment probably over the waiting list. I assume they're trying to keep existing customers happy which makes sense, and that scenario then frees up a smaller slip that they can then back-fill, sell to somebody else in other words. Anyway, I think the previous advice is good, helps a lot to know somebody or introduce yourself in person rather than relying on cold phone calls.
kthoennes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 12:50 PM   #9
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 17,003
Quote:
Originally Posted by kthoennes View Post
I'll bet lots of marinas are - well, flexible with waiting lists. We were on a waiting list ourselves for a while and here that list is really critical -- our marina is the only one that handles big(ger) boats for hundreds of miles around, so if you don't get in you're pretty much out of luck. From a business point of view though I can understand and swallow the flexibility. For example when we bought our bigger boat we needed a bigger slip (like immediately) and fortunately they gave us a bigger slip reassignment probably over the waiting list. I assume they're trying to keep existing customers happy which makes sense, and that scenario then frees up a smaller slip that they can then back-fill, sell to somebody else in other words. Anyway, I think the previous advice is good, helps a lot to know somebody or introduce yourself in person rather than relying on cold phone calls.
I think it's smart to be selective. When I referred to illegal, I'm simply referring to certain demographics they never rented to, mainly young single females.

It's very important that marinas are selective on liveaboards. It's important to all of you who do live aboard, because that's how they protect allowing live aboards by avoiding the problems that get others upset. While they are checking you out, just know you'll be glad once there that they checked your neighbor out. They really should run the same process of checking potential tenants out that apartments do.

You will get so much further in person than on the phone. Also, in person, if they can't help you they might assist you with someone who can.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 04:12 PM   #10
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,790
Agree with all the above, but there are a few more factors.

Look at it from the marina's perspective. The "best" customers are the ones who are never on their boat. Never use the showers and heads. Never fill the dumpster with trash. Don't take up space in the parking lot. Don't use much water. Don't need a dock hand to catch lines. Aren't there to complain about things or get into a feud with other boaters.

Livaboards are the exact opposite; they use more resources and add more to the overall wear-and-tear on the place. I personally think that's more than made up for by the free security they provide, but not all marinas see it that way.

Then, as mentioned, you have boaters who are just bad neighbors. Those who have deteriorating and sometimes unsafe boats. Those who come home late, drunk, and cause a disturbance. Those who spread out their junk along the docks and around the facilities. We've all seen that type, and it makes sense to try to avoid them.

Some marinas have a "no liveaboards" rule, but look the other way when the privilege isn't abused. Others have the rule and stick to it. A few I know allow liveaboards but limit their number, and are selective about who they allow.
__________________

CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012