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Old 12-17-2013, 05:52 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by bshillam View Post
When my wife and I had our first boat we bought two Dahon Mariners. Dahon is one of the largest folding bike manufactures so the price was reasonable. As well the Mariners are aluminum framed. What I noticed under our 200 lb body weight was that they flexed a good bit under strain. Not enough to make me not want to ride them but enough that I would only ride them on fairly flat conditions. ie A boardwalk, in town to run to get groceries, etc.
If I was to buy another folder, which I am considering, would be the Bike Friday Tikit. It is one of the best folders out there as far as I am concerned. I have talked to owners, nothing but raves. Best warranty out there and made here in the US. Second pick would be a Brompton.
Cheap bikes are just that, cheap. Not fun to ride, always need adjusting and plainly don't serve the purpose as most don't use them. Think of it as an extension to the boat, the great thing about folders you can take them with you in the car to work. I took mine to work, stored it in my office and road it during lunch.
In the cruising world I have found just the opposite...

The junkers with well oiled bearings get ridden all over, in the rain, left out, leaned against buidings with no locks...ect....etc...

The fancy, $600 bikes in their bags are neatly stowed away some place and the boater is afraid to get them dirty compared to the ones on deck taking salt spray but are handy at a moments notice.

Not saying nice bikes aren't a dream to ride...just that they don't suit everyone's boat or boating habits....
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Old 12-17-2013, 10:20 PM   #22
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I have a thing for folding bikes and I have owned many. 20" wheels are a must. Also install a galvanized chain for much better service. For my money the Dahon Speed Pro, P8 and P7 are the best but they are pricey. Recently I bought a Citizen Gotham and I am very impressed for the modest price.
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Old 12-18-2013, 09:34 AM   #23
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Try this link for a new version of electric assist

Mass. high-tech startup launches device that transforms any bike into an electric-hybrid - Winnipeg Free Press
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Old 12-18-2013, 04:41 PM   #24
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We rode our folding bikes extensively on the Great Loop. One is a Citizen and the other a Dahon, and both worked extremely well. I stored them in the engine room, so they were always clean and dry.

It is important to get the 7 speed versions, plus fenders and a rear rack for packages. The smaller wheels make the folded bike only 2 ft high, 2 ft wide, and 1 ft deep. When folded, they fit in the dinghy with plenty of room left for two people and things like groceries, and we took them folded on city busses as well.

We much preferred the smaller bikes for ease handling and riding in crowded or narrow places. I ride up to 100 mi a week on a road bike at home, and found these bikes natural to ride and fun to use. I often pulled a cart to the market and the smaller bike was easier to control while doing this.
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Old 12-18-2013, 08:48 PM   #25
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We wanted a tandem and did a lot of research including talking to some current owners; Bike Friday was the hands down winner.
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Old 12-21-2013, 06:37 PM   #26
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Hi Wally, we're cruising to Brazil, but still in Puerto Rico. We have two folding bikes that we use all the time when we are in some port. Buy and you certainly will use.
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Old 12-21-2013, 08:19 PM   #27
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I had an ancient all stainless Dahon that finally I sold this past summer. The rack on the back wasn't stainless and I'd replaced the chain with a stainless one but the doggone thing was heavy. Getting it into the dinghy and to shore became a problem and since I hadn't used it in 6 months I was fortunate to find a fellow whose eyes glowed at the stainless. Make sure whatever you pick is light enough that moving it won't be an issue. Mine rode like a champ (three speed, auto shift)

And, you can buy heavy duty tubes that last a lot longer than the cheap ones. Some of the larger sizes even come in foam though I didn't have that option when I replaced the tubes.

The idea of a bike was better than the reality though. I think if I was ever permanent I'd consider buying a dock bike, but for traveling? No. If the place is so far that a bike is required my get up and go would say "not today" and I'd either seek a car ride or pass. Are you a rider now? If not, I can't see you magically deciding to become one just because you cruise.

In my opinion that is.
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Old 05-19-2014, 08:34 AM   #28
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Old thread I know,just my .02 cents worth.
We use a couple of Montague Paratrooper Pro's.
There are full size (26") bike that doesn't flex at all,so just like riding a normal mountain bike.
They fold up into a bag reasonably well,however a bit bigger than the little 20" bikes.
We use them a lot on dirt trails so a smaller folding bike won't cut it.
The frames are great,very stiff.I some of the attachments are a bit on the cheap side for bikes of this price.
Very happy on the whole.
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Old 05-25-2014, 12:08 PM   #29
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I have a Schwinn, a little heavy but I like it.

http://www.schwinnbikes.com/usa/loop-16464
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Old 05-25-2014, 09:45 PM   #30
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We tried many bikes over the years and didn't like the weight or propensity for corrosion. We eventually bought two "Trek District" and love them. My 5' 2", 110lb. wife can carry both of them above shoulder height with one in each hand. They are carbon fiber and aircraft aluminum, but the best part is the drive system, the gears (pullies) are plastic and there is no chain, they are belt driven. There is nothing on these bikes to rust in the salt air.
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Old 05-31-2014, 11:18 AM   #31
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Bikes can tow folding shopping carts , so those cases of beer , the pair of propane bottles ot 4 bags of food are less bother over a couple of miles.

Beyond a 20 min bike ride , I call a cab!
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Old 05-31-2014, 12:16 PM   #32
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I bought a cheap 89 buck mountain bike wannabee from kmart in key west three years ago. Walked two miles to the store, rode back!!! It's pretty light and the gears are real handy for hills, carrying a load or pedaling into the wind. It sits on the back deck and often gets salted in heavy weather. Once out of the weather I rinse it off or the rain does it for me. Some wd40 or whatever on the critical things that like to rust. Replaced the seat with one a bit more comfy.

It has some rust on it, but everything still works. Not the lightest on the planet, but still not too heavy. No problem hoisting it one handed even when pile tied on a high pier.

Bottom line is for the cost, can't be beat. If I get a few more years out of it, great. I often burn way more money in diesel... in a day.
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Old 08-09-2014, 05:23 AM   #33
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FWIW, We had a couple of bikes aboard when we started full-time cruising. After in effect giving them a "tour of the area" for a couple of years we put them up in the give-n-take shed. (Thankfully, they were two craigslist bikes costing $25, and $30 ea).

We found in smaller towns (most of where we stopped) we just walked. And in larger towns we took the bus - - so those two bikes never got used.
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Old 08-09-2014, 10:21 AM   #34
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I had the cheaper dahon folding bikes and hated them. They are heavy for their size and awkward to move around in the boat. And yes the tires went flat quickly. Worst of all was the steering geometry. Because they fold the forks were too near vertical which makes for jerky clown bike type steering.
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:18 PM   #35
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We tried many bikes over the years and didn't like the weight or propensity for corrosion. We eventually bought two "Trek District" and love them. My 5' 2", 110lb. wife can carry both of them above shoulder height with one in each hand. They are carbon fiber and aircraft aluminum, but the best part is the drive system, the gears (pullies) are plastic and there is no chain, they are belt driven. There is nothing on these bikes to rust in the salt air.
Those look very bitchin'. We're using Montagues and enjoy the exercise aspect. A 20 mile ride is about right for this geezer and the gearing makes it fun. But these look like a vast improvement by eliminating the rusting bits.
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:34 PM   #36
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We tried many bikes over the years and didn't like the weight or propensity for corrosion. We eventually bought two "Trek District" and love them. My 5' 2", 110lb. wife can carry both of them above shoulder height with one in each hand. They are carbon fiber and aircraft aluminum, but the best part is the drive system, the gears (pullies) are plastic and there is no chain, they are belt driven. There is nothing on these bikes to rust in the salt air.
Could you send a link? I don't seem to be able to locate the model you have.....
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Old 08-09-2014, 08:54 PM   #37
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I had the cheaper dahon folding bikes and hated them. They are heavy for their size and awkward to move around in the boat. And yes the tires went flat quickly. Worst of all was the steering geometry. Because they fold the forks were too near vertical which makes for jerky clown bike type steering.
We have a couple of Island Hopper folding bikes. When my grandsons were young they saw the bikes. They asked whose clown bikes, and could they ride them. Not good bikes, but have served the purpose.
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Old 08-09-2014, 09:53 PM   #38
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We have a couple of Island Hopper folding bikes. When my grandsons were young they saw the bikes. They asked whose clown bikes, and could they ride them. Not good bikes, but have served the purpose.
I think as long as you wear those really big shoes and a large red nose while riding them, these bikes are fine. People just think the circus is in town, and that makes everyone happy.
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Old 08-09-2014, 11:09 PM   #39
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I think as long as you wear those really big shoes and a large red nose while riding them, these bikes are fine. People just think the circus is in town, and that makes everyone happy.
Small shoes make my feet hurt, and that is my real nose.
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Old 08-10-2014, 12:07 AM   #40
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Never needed more than taxi, bus, or train on land (but we mostly walk). ... In flat-land Copenhagen, there are hundreds (thousands?) of free, publicly-available bikes not used. ... In Venice, public boats get you wherever, as well as workaday transport.

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