Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-13-2012, 09:39 AM   #21
Guru
 
ARoss's Avatar
 
City: Chocowinity NC
Vessel Name: My Yuki
Vessel Model: 1973 Marine Trader 34
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Fill View Post
You can weaken the planks by ripping/sawing slices/groves deep enough so the plank will bend. Then when fastening to the wall fill the groves with epoxy with additive which will harder and give the blank strength again. When rebuilding the Portuguese bridge I used ply that I ripped groves in, and then filled the groves with epoxy.
This might be a statement of the obvious to most, but the "grooves" or kerf cuts, should be perpendicular to the intended bend of the wood strip. Also, keeping the cuts uniform in depth and spacing is important in maintaining a smooth curve.
__________________
Advertisement

ARoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2012, 10:31 AM   #22
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobo View Post
So you used the Liquid Nail instead of fg in the bathroom to put your 'ribs' in?
NO - I used Liquid nail that is used/meant to hold a bath/shower enclosure. I also put a few small nails. I figure if it can hold a shower/tub enclosure, it should hold on the interior of a boat. The Liquid nail dries/hold in less than 30 seconds

I do use a lot of West System Epoxy for exterior stuff, and some interior. Epoxy if mixed hot will take about 10 to 20 minutes to set up. To long for me to hold.

__________________

Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2012, 02:43 PM   #23
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Lobo
Vessel Model: International Offshore - Portuguese Bridge Pilot House Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBomba View Post
Thanks, we were wondering about the screws, if they would look like zippers every few feet along the walls but if countersunk... We were wondering if we glued the tongue and groove to fasten the planks if brad nails would be enough to hold it down since it will be solid.
Depending on how much bend you need you may not get it using tongue and groove. You can use a canoe bit set on a router which gives a round on one edge of the plank and concave on the other which fit very nicely together and will bend to a sharp angle and can be glued in the joint. IMHO I would not consider using brad nails as the primary fastener, they can work themselves out especially where bends are involved.[/QUOTE]

I guess I had the terms wrong again, bead and cove is the joint planned for. If glued together do you think the brad nails would work out We were thinking that since the glue will make it like an interior hull the brad nails would simply keep it in place
__________________
Lobo
Lobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2012, 11:30 PM   #24
Guru
 
LaBomba's Avatar
 
City: Beaverton, Ontario
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Airswift
Vessel Model: Ontario Yachts Great Lakes 33
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 818
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lobo View Post
Depending on how much bend you need you may not get it using tongue and groove. You can use a canoe bit set on a router which gives a round on one edge of the plank and concave on the other which fit very nicely together and will bend to a sharp angle and can be glued in the joint. IMHO I would not consider using brad nails as the primary fastener, they can work themselves out especially where bends are involved.
I guess I had the terms wrong again, bead and cove is the joint planned for. If glued together do you think the brad nails would work out We were thinking that since the glue will make it like an interior hull the brad nails would simply keep it in place[/QUOTE]

Yes Lobo, your bead and cove is what I was referring to as a canoe bit, that will work good for you. I am still not a fan of brad nails on anything that has movement or vibration, I would personally rather use some counter sunk screws and you could get away with fewer than using brads and if they are kept in straight lines they really don't look bad at all. Only my opinion of course. Good luck with your project and send pics when done.

Allan
LaBomba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2012, 12:18 PM   #25
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Lobo
Vessel Model: International Offshore - Portuguese Bridge Pilot House Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBomba View Post
I guess I had the terms wrong again, bead and cove is the joint planned for. If glued together do you think the brad nails would work out We were thinking that since the glue will make it like an interior hull the brad nails would simply keep it in place
Yes Lobo, your bead and cove is what I was referring to as a canoe bit, that will work good for you. I am still not a fan of brad nails on anything that has movement or vibration, I would personally rather use some counter sunk screws and you could get away with fewer than using brads and if they are kept in straight lines they really don't look bad at all. Only my opinion of course. Good luck with your project and send pics when done.

Allan[/QUOTE]

I don't think that I mentioned that we will be gluing the planks onto the battens so the brad nails are just to hold it in place till the glue sets. What do you think?
__________________
Lobo
Lobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2012, 02:55 PM   #26
Guru
 
LaBomba's Avatar
 
City: Beaverton, Ontario
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Airswift
Vessel Model: Ontario Yachts Great Lakes 33
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 818
Lobo, if your gluing first then the brads would certainly hold until the glue dries. One other consideration though, this all sounds very permanent. If there is any wiring, plumbing etc. behind this area it would not be accessible if glued and nailed. I like to take access into consideration when it might be needed, either now or in the future....just a thought.

Allan
LaBomba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2012, 06:57 AM   #27
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,530
We had plenty of space between the overhead beams .

A sound absorbing product from Armstrong that imitates wood planking was cut to fit fore and aft.It is about 3/4 in thick.

It is snaps together and held in place from falling with a strip of mahogany ply.

I just got a 1/4 in mahogany ply sheet 10 ft long and ripped it into 2 inch strips .

Then did a mass varnishing. The trim strips are held up with screws and finishing washers .

The insulation and noise reduction does work.

The smooth curve of the ply and the insulation mask the fact the heavy beams were not band sawed with perfection.
FF is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2012, 10:26 PM   #28
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Lobo
Vessel Model: International Offshore - Portuguese Bridge Pilot House Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaBomba View Post
Lobo, if your gluing first then the brads would certainly hold until the glue dries. One other consideration though, this all sounds very permanent. If there is any wiring, plumbing etc. behind this area it would not be accessible if glued and nailed. I like to take access into consideration when it might be needed, either now or in the future....just a thought.

Allan
That is definately a consideration so we will be running wiring and plumbing in the engine room/hold rooms under the staterooms and then where we need to bring it through the insulated, finished wall to where it is going. Lots of planning prior to doing anything!!!
__________________
Lobo
Lobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 02:32 AM   #29
Member
 
City: Campbell River
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Lobo
Vessel Model: International Offshore - Portuguese Bridge Pilot House Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
Everything snaps up with plastic catches ,,sorta velcro like system , but both sides are plastic that catch on identical plastic.

Pulls down fairly simply , so changing wiring , (he is switching to LED) or ordinary access is a SNAP!

Recovering is also very easy when the time comes to refresh the overhead..
I would be interested in a brand or product name for the 'velcro' they used. Our West Coast 47 had that sort of overhead finish and it was 'tough' and what we are thinking of using on this one.

Oh, the forward head is no more along with the mold and skum, just nice clean fiberglass. Now the stateroom...
__________________
Lobo
Lobo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2012, 06:33 AM   #30
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,530
"I would be interested in a brand or product name for the 'velcro' they used."

Its not a fabric , but a set of 1 or 1 1/4 inch diameter thin plastic buttons.

Ask Nordy customer service,,,
__________________

FF is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
ceiling, tongue and groove, v-joints, walls

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012