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Old 04-02-2018, 04:43 AM   #1
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Could 30ft boat be comfortable for liveaboards?

Well, don't take this too serious, this is just thinking/dreaming out loud like no one is listening, because if you take it too serious, I know that all the reasons will be against it and of course all reasons will be able to prove and the fact is that there is actually no one living on the board as we all know, but, what a heck, nobody really has a boat either so, I will proceed with the question anyway

1. Would anyone experienced even consider it, and if it is possible would the layout define what type is practical? Open cockpit boat , with cabin of course, separate head and kitchen, otherwise "monovolume" cabin (no separate cabins)? Yes, considering the one that I already own, not planning to sell one of the kidneys and invest in the bitcoin market to achieve the dream, well maybe just the SO's stuff ...just kidding...

2. At first, I would test this for two summer months (SO included ) to see and compare what would really be the problem with what I now think would be the problem. Am I wrong if I currently think that the most important for extended period are the things that will give some better comfort, especially because of the SO (like hot water and heating, although these are not critical in the summer)? What are your experiences on this? What has shown as the biggest issue in the beginning?

Well, I will not ask further questions before receiving some answers because they will probably give me the insight in the most important issues of which I am not aware currently.
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Old 04-02-2018, 05:05 AM   #2
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What do you consider live aboard? And where?

We cruised for 4-6 wks fairly comfortable with a 28 ft cruiser in NE in summer.

Would we even consider selling S&B house & trying to put everything we own aboard??? And then live on it 365 dys/yr... NOT

That said I know others that have done the above w a Searay 268 and a pickup truck.
Toured the country and boated so it could be done.

Not for me but you & SO get to decide... nobody else even gets a vote.
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Old 04-02-2018, 05:25 AM   #3
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Living aboard with or without a regular house someplace? or a place to store a lot of stuff?

Climate is critical.

Lifestyle is somewhat critical....full time working? necessary wardrobe?

Marina facilities? marina affordability?

One of the biggest factors is that boat living isnt necessarily a great way to save money if that is the goal.

Cruising and living on the hook can be, but it can be a tough lifestyle or pretty enjoyable if there is a lot of flexibility in your life.
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Old 04-02-2018, 05:48 AM   #4
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Fastest way possible to turn a significant other into a lost love....even during the summer.
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:39 AM   #5
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What do you consider live aboard? And where?
What do you consider live aboard? And where?

Would we even consider selling S&B house & trying to put everything we own aboard??? And then live on it 365 dys/yr... NOT

Not for me but you & SO get to decide... nobody else even gets a vote.
What do we consider as liveaboard is what I want to discover here, in what sense we want it to be and what is acceptable to us. Where - on the river Danube in southeastern Europe.

Definitively not selling everything and putting it on the boat. More like adventure, change of habits without risking vital..."stuff". Choosing better location for that period in the beginning, better for commuting, better surroundings, better connections to everything where we are losing time, maybe using more bicycles and buses instead of a car. Decision is, of course, on us exclusively, just want to hear what did the others experience on similar route of which I am not aware. The longest cruising we had is 3 weeks, in the summer of course, similar to your traveling.

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Living aboard with or without a regular house someplace? or a place to store a lot of stuff?

Climate is critical.

Lifestyle is somewhat critical....full time working? necessary wardrobe?

Marina facilities? marina affordability?

One of the biggest factors is that boat living isnt necessarily a great way to save money if that is the goal.

Cruising and living on the hook can be, but it can be a tough lifestyle or pretty enjoyable if there is a lot of flexibility in your life.
Keeping the regular house as I have said, sounds too risky otherwise. Full time working. Wardrobe - I can see where you are going, we have enough cabinets, but according to SO not enough, that one is a bit tricky. Still, have enough room for it, just need to be "redone" if we take that as priority, actually, that would be the easiest to redone, but will it be acceptable I do not know. In the marina definitely - water, electricity, faster "commuting" off the boat, though good question about marina facilities, what are the key ones - laundry maybe? The adventure is the reason rather than saving money, I do not expect to save money, rather expect to spend equally, maybe exchanging the car expenses on the other things related in the process, but saving time and using it better is precious to me in this case. On the hook is not possible now, and my current location is not that attractive for it anyway, not thinking of it currently. Tempting, but problem with living on the hook is that you need too much money to prepare a boat to live on the hook and that makes contradictory requirements, that is how I see it (currently).

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Fastest way possible to turn a significant other into a lost love....even during the summer.
Well, I expected such experiences as answers, too. Actually, while cruising, she enjoys relaxing more than at home, while I enjoy working everything and anything while cruising more than at home (well, even when not cruising, but being at the water, even in a marina). It makes me more active and that is what I like in the process, I feel more alive and plan more ahead. I am not a TV person at home if you think that, we do not even own a TV (our choice).
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:52 AM   #6
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Living aboard ....now my 3rd time and now over 12 years, first 6 working full time.

When working full time and not using the boat a lot (which often becomes harder when you liveaboard a small one as theres too much crammed in), there is a lot less adventure to it.

Often it is just more difficult living compared to a dirt dwelling but with a close up water view.

Trying it out in short durations is a good way to see if it is a fit.....

....but if you dont already have a boat, selecting a small liveaboard becomes a tug of war over livability versus a boat you want to use on a regular basis.

this goes to open room arrangement versus more cabins/spaces.

boat design and use often determines that to a great degree on smaller vessels.
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Old 04-02-2018, 06:53 AM   #7
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What do we consider as liveaboard is what I want to discover here, in what sense we want it to be and what is acceptable to us. Where - on the river Danube in southeastern Europe.

IIRC, it still gets cold there in winter...

So I'll mention in the cold areas around here, availability of water and pumping out the holding tank (mandatory within our 3 mile limit, assuming an MSD is fitted) in winter can be challenging. And then there's heating. And then there's icy docks and/or cold commuting from boat to shore if anchored out or on a mooring buoy.

None of that is necessarily unsolvable; just helps to know in advance what you may have to consider.

FWIW, we are currently "camp-aboards" on our 42. I don't see us being comfortable on this particular boat as no-kidding full-time liveaboards, even though we have good features and good storage space. Just not enough elbow room for all our other hobbies.

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Old 04-02-2018, 06:55 AM   #8
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Lived on and worked from my boat (Regal 2785, 30 LOA) for just two weeks last summer with my dog. Wife just visited on the weekends. It was fine, but I was ready to come home once it rained for 3 days in a row. Tough to do serious work from the boat (no true desk) and tough from the clubhouse too (everyone wants to chat). One more week would have been too much for me.

But of course I was dying to get back the following weekend.
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Old 04-02-2018, 07:13 AM   #9
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Many factors can be involved with this including the physical dimensions of the couple, their physical health, their mental health, their age, their upbringing, the comfort level they are used to, acceptance of safety risks, financial resources and even sleeping habits. Then you have said little about the boat. House boat? Trawler? Express cruiser? Some of the living spaces can be smaller than a prison cell.

Back in the day I grew up, there was a back to nature movement. It was mostly land based, but the concept is largely the same. Certainly, some survived it and still live that way today. For most, it was a dismal failure.

Certainly it can be done and if you did it for 3 weeks, you might be able to go for 3 months. Going through a winter in Europe on a boat won't be fun. And keep in mind, mother nature is UNDEFEATED.
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Old 04-02-2018, 08:24 AM   #10
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It all depends on what you and the significant other are use to or can get use to. My daughter is a college professor in Japan. A 30' live aboard would probably have about the same space as her micro apartment.

Have met 2 couples doing the great loop on Ranger Tugs. My reservation on smaller boats deals with how long between pump out, fill water tank, and getting groceries.

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Old 04-02-2018, 09:02 AM   #11
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I would never, ever under any circumstances elect to live on my 40’ Silverton. Our boat is our toy. We also are in the north east where zero degree days do happen, often during winters and of course snow.

It takes a large boat to enjoy comforts of a live aboard. Now can one live aboard in a smaller boat? Sure! Some people even live in tents although many not by choice.
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:30 AM   #12
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I’ve found that it takes about three weeks to decompress from your former lifestyle, and about six or seven weeks to fully accept/adopt the simpler way of living...at least while sea kayaking.

Before embarking on such trips, my wife and I discussed the possibility of us getting into arguments or having conflicts because of the disruption to our ‘normal’ lives, additional stressors, and living so close to each other. Made those very rare moments less traumatic.

Only you can make the call...some people wouldn’t consider it on anything less than a million dollar boat
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:41 AM   #13
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Living aboard ....now my 3rd time and now over 12 years, first 6 working full time.

When working full time and not using the boat a lot (which often becomes harder when you liveaboard a small one as theres too much crammed in), there is a lot less adventure to it.

Often it is just more difficult living compared to a dirt dwelling but with a close up water view.

Trying it out in short durations is a good way to see if it is a fit.....

....but if you dont already have a boat, selecting a small liveaboard becomes a tug of war over livability versus a boat you want to use on a regular basis.

this goes to open room arrangement versus more cabins/spaces.

boat design and use often determines that to a great degree on smaller vessels.
3rd time, 12 years, obviously demanding since not at once. Congrats!!!
Now, when you have that conclusion that in that case it is less adventurous, would you still skip that step in the process if you could turn back, or you valuate it now as one reach experience which had to be done?
Well, it seems that I am happy since I already have a boat.


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IIRC, it still gets cold there in winter...

So I'll mention in the cold areas around here, availability of water and pumping out the holding tank (mandatory within our 3 mile limit, assuming an MSD is fitted) in winter can be challenging. And then there's heating. And then there's icy docks and/or cold commuting from boat to shore if anchored out or on a mooring buoy.

None of that is necessarily unsolvable; just helps to know in advance what you may have to consider.

FWIW, we are currently "camp-aboards" on our 42. I don't see us being comfortable on this particular boat as no-kidding full-time liveaboards, even though we have good features and good storage space. Just not enough elbow room for all our other hobbies.

-Chris
Yes, cold is the biggest problem and that is why I am skipping it still, if "not possible" for us in warm months, then no point of investing in "winter heating" equipment, well it does, but more in a long term way. I have never chosen to be at a buoy in "home" marina, it is really wasting of time. I agree with your description "camp-aboards", that would definitively be our first attempt. Never thought of "hobbies" I do at home, I will try to remember all of those.

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Originally Posted by BDofMSP View Post
Lived on and worked from my boat (Regal 2785, 30 LOA) for just two weeks last summer with my dog. Wife just visited on the weekends. It was fine, but I was ready to come home once it rained for 3 days in a row. Tough to do serious work from the boat (no true desk) and tough from the clubhouse too (everyone wants to chat). One more week would have been too much for me.

But of course I was dying to get back the following weekend.
Sounds totally realistic, but from my perspective I think that you would have a greater chance succeeding it if you have been together with your wife. This way, even you yourself did not take it seriously enough. Though, there are different personalities, too. Rain, well, we should learn from guys in Netherlands about it, if they would have thought that way they would have nothing, but they take their raincoats and do everything the same as it is not raining, even driving bicycles, so we are actually just spoiled (although I am still learning that, trust me newly learned fishing passion helps a lot, just find what motivates you). I hear you about the desk, that can be a problem for the back, but it depends of boat layout.


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Originally Posted by Donsan View Post
Many factors can be involved with this including the physical dimensions of the couple, their physical health, their mental health, their age, their upbringing, the comfort level they are used to, acceptance of safety risks, financial resources and even sleeping habits. Then you have said little about the boat. House boat? Trawler? Express cruiser? Some of the living spaces can be smaller than a prison cell.

Back in the day I grew up, there was a back to nature movement. It was mostly land based, but the concept is largely the same. Certainly, some survived it and still live that way today. For most, it was a dismal failure.

Certainly it can be done and if you did it for 3 weeks, you might be able to go for 3 months. Going through a winter in Europe on a boat won't be fun. And keep in mind, mother nature is UNDEFEATED.
Yes, I will upload a boat layout. Thanks for the motivation and opinion that we can do it, that same opinion made me believe that we could do it. Yes, mother nature is to be respected.


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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
It all depends on what you and the significant other are use to or can get use to. My daughter is a college professor in Japan. A 30' live aboard would probably have about the same space as her micro apartment.

Have met 2 couples doing the great loop on Ranger Tugs. My reservation on smaller boats deals with how long between pump out, fill water tank, and getting groceries.

Ted
Exactly, it depends how spoiled we are, but it also should be taken into consideration how old, healthy and fit are the people (we are about 35, your daughter is probably young, too). Truth about the period between refills. We can get around 7 days when cruising with 260 liters water tank (we learned that, from about 2 days in the beginning). Now should be even more since we have bought two solar bags, 20 liters each.


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I would never, ever under any circumstances elect to live on my 40 Silverton. Our boat is our toy. We also are in the north east where zero degree days do happen, often during winters and of course snow.

It takes a large boat to enjoy comforts of a live aboard. Now can one live aboard in a smaller boat? Sure! Some people even live in tents although many not by choice.
I understand what you are saying, but as I have already talked about cold days, I will not repeat myself, but I do respect the facts that you are pointing, even though you have bigger boat/toy.


OK, here are the layouts, but, mind that our boat is a bit different inside, it is just that I have drawings for this version. Instead of explaining the differences I will attach a couple of photos.
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Old 04-02-2018, 09:48 AM   #14
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Nice looking boat. We could not liveaboard it for even a week due to our back issues. We want/need recliners to be comfortable but then again we are in our mid sixties so our situation is different than yours. When we were in our 30s we could have stayed on a boat such as yours. It all depends on your particular situation. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:28 AM   #15
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Nidza

That is a very nice weekend or vacation boat.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:31 AM   #16
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I lived aboard a 23-foot sailboat that did not have standing headroom for about 3 months when I was much younger. I would not call that "comfortable."

What I learned, however, is that "comfortable" is something that only you can define for yourself. There was another fellow, living in the same marina, living on-board a 25-foot "walk-around" style fishing boat. I cannot even BEGIN to imagine how he thought that was a way to live long-term, but he had been there for two years and was still there long after I had moved into an apartment.

Different strokes for different folks.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:50 AM   #17
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We had a Chris Craft 280. Similar sized boat and laid out about the same. We thought of it as a 'long weekend' boat. After about 4 days we were ready to come home.
Again biggest issue will be storage. Get all your work clothes and food and supplies for a week in a pile and see how much room they take up. And you'll need more than just the minimum.
You will need space to get away from the boat and each other too. Experience talking here..
Still much more is possible at 35 than that 60 + !!
If the boat is positioned where its possible load up for a week and try it !!
That will provide answers and more questions.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:11 AM   #18
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My general thoughts about living on boats smaller than 30’ equate to the same as living in one’s bathroom. Boats slightly larger than 30’, add a closet to the bathroom
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:33 AM   #19
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My wife and I lived aboard our 28 foot sailboat. It was beamy and displaced 8.5 tons, had six feet of standing headroom....

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Old 04-02-2018, 11:53 AM   #20
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I'm 70 and live aboard and have lived aboard ships and boats much of my adult life. I don't think the layout is as important as room and storage. Having laundry on board is a big deal to me. On small boats I hated to have to haul laundry and find a washer/dryer that hadn't been used to clean garage towels or pet bedding. Also the room to carry enough food and properly store for long trips.
I don't find age to be a limiting factor. I damaged a lot of parts when I was younger. They bother me at times, but they would bother me in a house, too. Just living in a house would bother me more.
Having a big boat allows me many more options for travel, heating, cooking, fishing offshore, room for hobbies and so on.
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