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Old 03-05-2019, 05:13 PM   #1
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Boat recommendations? (Research stage)

I am an early 40ís, landlocked, obsessive traveler, considering a liveaboard. Iím a single female, currently living in a studio apartment with very few belongings. I donít need much space, but would prefer two staterooms if I have company. Donít need a megayacht by any means, but a comfortable bedroom and living area with space for a couch.

My idea is to live in different cities worldwide for a month to few months at a time, with the boat being floating housing for me. So mostly coast hugging in the Caribbean, Mediterranean and South Pacific as ideal locations. But I need to be able to get it across the ocean(s) at some point; which may be years in between crossings.

The amount of boat types is overwhelming! From what I have researched, itís looking like trawlers and motoryachts are the most recommended for non-sailors. (Yes, I am looking into sailboats too). Budget is under $100k for a used one, so a Nordvham seems to be out of the question

Does anyone have suggestions? And of course, I have no experience yet.
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Old 03-05-2019, 05:50 PM   #2
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If you are dreaming out loud, great. Enjoy the dream. If this is a troll, shame on you. If you are serious, you have started at the wrong point. You should start with a power squadron class.
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:01 PM   #3
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What you will need is a sail boat. I would think about moving close to the coast where you could meet people who would be willing to show you how it's done. Finding a trawler capable of going places you want to go, with the budget you have set, is going to be really tough to do. But lot's of people do it in sail boats. There are lot's of videos on YouTube of people doing what you want to do, but 99% are doing in sail boats.

Check out these channels:
http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgAW5P0Xf4iOBAr4PSQ9oRQ

http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRqsOR0Y2zru-jXSzLcMcxg

http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkYfFeySHGN4DPrOc9So7PA
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:35 PM   #4
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Not a troll - and I seriously am at the beginning, beginning stages of looking. I don’t know the difference between anything yet. I have been recommended a sailboat mostly, but am exploring all the options.
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Old 03-05-2019, 06:37 PM   #5
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If your father is Bill Gates, then consider a Fleming Yacht, otherwise as said in an above post, you will be looking at a sailboat.

For a request of a decent sailboat, begin another thread here:

Monohull Sailboats - Cruisers & Sailing Forums

Or here, Multihull sailboats:

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f48/
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Old 03-05-2019, 07:41 PM   #6
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Sailboats generally have a lot less operating costs getting from A to B. You trade that for the time it takes. But in the event of complications the costs rack up nearly as quickly as power. That and pointing a motorboat in a given direction is a lot less involved than sailing.
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Old 03-05-2019, 08:07 PM   #7
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For coastal cruising, a trawler can be as cheap to operate as a sailboat (counting price of rigging and sail refresh etc).

If you are hell bent on the three destinations you mentioned, only a sailboat will have the range you need to get it done on a budget.

But in reality, if you are talking about bouncing around from the South Pacific to the Med, you don't have any idea of what that entails. That journey by itself is multiple years for most people.

Get an idea of what you really want to do. Coastal cruising is cheap, circumnavigating is not. Figure out what you really want to do and can afford to do, that will help you figure out what boat you want.

I've been a sailor, currently a powerboater with plans to become a sailor again, you really need to figure out what you want to do because they are very different boats.
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Old 03-05-2019, 09:16 PM   #8
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GK - You'll struggle to find a powerboat or a sailing catamaran that will cross oceans with a 100k budget. With a monohull sailboat it is possible, but will take a few years of dedication to build up the skills required.

Another option may be to do it with three different coastal cruiser sailboats; just buy and sell as required. Start looking at yachtworld.com and get to know the value of different boats. Join a sailing club. Enjoy!
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:32 PM   #9
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Living on a yacht isn't the same as living in Denver. For the type of boat that will do what you are asking requires a significant on going income stream in addition to just buying the boat. Because buying the boat is just the start. The costs will be reduced if you decide not to cross oceans. Successfully crossing oceans escalates the required items and expenses versus a coastal cruiser. There are no marinas in the middle of the South Pacific.

Then there is the training and skill you need to do the job. As a suggestion if you have flexible time, you can be part of a crew or hand on a vessel that is traveling. There are a couple of site where you can be free labor on a vessel going on all kinds of trips. Or you may need to chip in for some expenses. I would also recommend getting training at some of the schools since you have no experience, A school can at least teach you terms, what is proper on the water and other things. Doesn't replace being on the water and yet there are on the water classes too.
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Old 03-05-2019, 11:18 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterkitten View Post
I am an early 40ís, landlocked, obsessive traveler, considering a liveaboard. Iím a single female, currently living in a studio apartment with very few belongings. I donít need much space, but would prefer two staterooms if I have company. Donít need a megayacht by any means, but a comfortable bedroom and living area with space for a couch.

My idea is to live in different cities worldwide for a month to few months at a time, with the boat being floating housing for me. So mostly coast hugging in the Caribbean, Mediterranean and South Pacific as ideal locations. But I need to be able to get it across the ocean(s) at some point; which may be years in between crossings.

The amount of boat types is overwhelming! From what I have researched, itís looking like trawlers and motoryachts are the most recommended for non-sailors. (Yes, I am looking into sailboats too). Budget is under $100k for a used one, so a Nordvham seems to be out of the question

Does anyone have suggestions? And of course, I have no experience yet.
Wifey B: Ok, I just woke up to this and it sure woke me up. 6:00 AM here. Now, a reality check.

You're a lot of training and experience away. If you really work at it, I could see you doing some coastal cruising in a year or two. I could even see you cruising in the Caribbean in the next 5 years and perhaps cross an ocean in 10-15. That's with a lot of time on it and you may not have that time while trying to make a living at the same time. You didn't say if you intend to do that on the boat or in each city you move around to.

Have you ever seen the original "Sound of Music" with Julie Andrews? There's a very important song. Do Re Mi.

Let's start at the very beginning
A very good place to start
When you read you begin with ABC
When you sing you begin with Do, Re, Mi, Do, Re, Mi
The first three notes just happen to be
Do, Re, Mi,

You're jumping way too far too fast. You don't even know if you'll like a boat. You're on a limited budget, so you going to learn to maintain it?

Now, you have a dream and I applaud that and 40 is still young. I thought it was old but I turn it in June so now I'm saying it's young. Very young. Before you think worldwide, think of getting just to where there is water and out of Denver. You could get a cheaper boat and do the coast and the great loop but it wouldn't be capable of oceans. However, it would be far more capable than you would be. Take courses, take a Captains Class. Rent a boat. Charter a boat. Join a sailing club. Immerse yourself and then see how you feel.

You're probably thinking of buying your lifetime boat, but let me tell you no one does that at 40. Oh, you'll hear, "I'm buying my last boat first." BS. Totally. They think. Then they buy their next last boat and their next. Find the threads of N4061. His Nordhavn 40 was his last. He even tattooed it on his TF. Then a Helmsman. Definitely it. Well, except now he's starting to build another. When he hits 99 years old he'll be in one boat planning another. I teasing him but we're worse. It's just you need to find what will work for you after some training but not plan on the Caribbean and World yet. That leaves you dreams for the future. You could spend decades seeing part of this country by water that you've never seen.

Best of luck, just take it one step at a time.
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Old 03-06-2019, 05:20 AM   #11
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I have a buddy in Australia preparing for the next leg in his circumnavigation. I'll ask if he wants company. Ready to go?

You can piggyback your boat on a ship for crossing oceans. Open water gets pretty samey and you might not like it. Not that much, anyway.
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Old 03-06-2019, 07:24 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glitterkitten View Post
I am an early 40ís, landlocked, obsessive traveler, considering a liveaboard. Iím a single female, currently living in a studio apartment with very few belongings. I donít need much space, but would prefer two staterooms if I have company. Donít need a megayacht by any means, but a comfortable bedroom and living area with space for a couch.

My idea is to live in different cities worldwide for a month to few months at a time, with the boat being floating housing for me. So mostly coast hugging in the Caribbean, Mediterranean and South Pacific as ideal locations. But I need to be able to get it across the ocean(s) at some point; which may be years in between crossings.

It's good to have a starting point... and when we were living in Parker and working in Aurora back in the early '90s, our normal location near the Chesapeake seemed pretty far away...

Your concept is likely going to turn into one of those situations where you can meet criteria for living comfort, affordability, and long distances... but you can only pick any two of those three criteria.

OTOH, it's your dream, so you can also modify it (if you choose) as you learn more about competing requirements. Consider: crossing oceans probably means either a sailboat, a more sea-worthy powerboat with suitable tankage, or shipping your boat across commercially. But deciding instead to limit yourself to the east coast of North America and the nearby islands... for example... piece o' cake for a more modest powerboat. Even adding the east coast of Central and South America, for example, could be possible for that kind of boat.

That's a boatload of potential travel, and the occasional airplane to Europe or wherever could suffice for some.

Will you have to work during all this? If so, how do you imagine that fitting in?

-Chris
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Old 03-06-2019, 08:24 AM   #13
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A quick tip on the budget: you'll almost certainly need a hefty amount of cash to fix the boat up. Look to buy something with 60-70% of your budget, keep the rest for upgrades and fixes. Are you handy? The going rate for boat service here in Boston is $90-an-hour; you can believe that adds up quick.

For sailboats, try looking for a monohull deck saloon. They are a little more open and have more windows than your standard cave-like monohull. I don't know if you'll be able to find anything for that price that can do big water, but it's worth a look.
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:10 AM   #14
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If you are dreaming out loud, great. Enjoy the dream. If this is a troll, shame on you. If you are serious, you have started at the wrong point. You should start with a power squadron class.
WTF?

I never even heard about power squadron class before I bought my first large boat. You're kinda coming off as the troll here.


Back on topic.

Stick to the US, Islands and maybe mexico and you're on the right path with a trawler.

If you want to cross large bodies of water then i'd say you'll have to get a sailboat but with a coastal cruiser you can easily island hop further than you'd think.

@ that budget i'd look at a 36' Grand Banks or similar. With patience you'd be able to explore from chicago to the Virgin islands on the east side(island hopping vs direct) and all up the pac nw on the west(not too familiar with those waters). The Grand Banks is seaworthy with plenty of range but open ocean crossing trawlers are pretty exclusive.

As to a sailing. yes it's cheaper, the boats are more capable per linear foot(and cheaper) but it can be dangerous and solo sailing is more sport than adventure.

Another option would be to spend about 40k on a smaller cheaper coastal cruiser so you can "try" it out. I have a Mainship 34 that would be very comfortable alone, has great range, cheap to buy and run. 40k would buy an excellent 34' MK1. There's also the Marine trader, Albin, and many other models that can be had under 50k.This could be a great option because if you want to explore a new leg in Europe or really far away you can just sell it and purchase overseas.

Also you can stay on boats through Airbnb to compare living space(can't take it out though). I didn't do this and wish I had before buying my boat. Doesn't hurt that most places are cheap to boot.
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Old 03-06-2019, 09:35 AM   #15
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WTF?

I never even heard about power squadron class before I bought my first large boat. You're kinda coming off as the troll here.
.
I find it irresponsible to suggest anything but more education to the OP. What educational service would you suggest for some one who started off with a desire to cross oceans with no boating experience.

Why the need to insult me? I merely pointed out the difficulty of taking the question seriously.
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Old 03-06-2019, 10:05 AM   #16
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?..You can piggyback your boat on a ship for crossing oceans...
We met a couple while we were in Mexico that cruised on ~40’ fast power boat (don’t remember the make). They had cruised the Med, Australia and Mexico. They move the boat around as cargo on large ships. They’d being doing it for ~7 years. Something to consider.
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Old 03-06-2019, 10:18 AM   #17
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GK, some more thoughts about how to think abut moving your concept forward...

Imagine living on a boat in Denver's climate... on Lake Dillon or some such. Several winter issues to solve. Now imagine living on the same boat in Miami. Climate matters... so you'll want to think about how that impacts where you want to be at any given time.

Imagine you're happy as a clam on your boat in Miami... but you decide you want to try Charleston for a while. Good idea, nice place... but that means you have to get the boat from A to B (or M to C, in this example). That implies you hire a captain...or you do it yourself. Latter can be easy, but that means you'll need to know navigation stuff, how to read charts, follow nav aids on the water, and so forth... so you don't bounce your hull off the bottom... too many times, at least.

Did that? Good, now were approaching Charleston at you're at the helm. Gotta tie that boat up... so you'll need to be at the helm, jockeying the boat with engines and gears... and you'll need to be on deck, having a great time getting lines on cleats or piles or whatever. All at (almost) the same time. Which means maybe you hope for help from a dock hand (there's a whole 'nother story in sometimes useless) or a crew member. (Got a potential crew member?) Or do it yourself, not impossible, but a learning curve.

Now speaking about learning curves... let's say you get a leak in your onboard freshwater system. Not to worry, call a guy. At about $100/hour. Or assuming the checkbook isn't limitless... do it yourself; maybe not even all that hard, but it means you might need to learn some basic plumbing skills.

Fixed that, now you notice the freshwater pump doesn't. Another plumbing problem? Maybe, or maybe not. Might be electrical. OK, so now you need to learn some basic electricity skills.

And to extend that... engine skills, and HVAC (air conditioning. heat, etc.) skills, maybe eventually some fiberglass skills if you hose up the "dock by yourself" thing too many times...

IOW, you'll have to learn a whole bunch of boating-related and maintenance stuff...

AND NONE OF THAT LEARNING IS INSURMOUNTABLE. Some isn't even all that difficult in the grand scheme of things.

I truly do not mean this to sound discouraging. Just hoping to make you aware there's more to boating than just buying a boat and mixing mint juleps (or more appropriately in the boating community, rums and somethings.

-Chris
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Old 03-06-2019, 11:16 AM   #18
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I find it irresponsible to suggest anything but more education to the OP. What educational service would you suggest for some one who started off with a desire to cross oceans with no boating experience.

Why the need to insult me? I merely pointed out the difficulty of taking the question seriously.
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If you are dreaming out loud, great. Enjoy the dream. If this is a troll, shame on you. If you are serious, you have started at the wrong point. You should start with a power squadron class.
Quite inviting.
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Old 03-06-2019, 11:23 AM   #19
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I find it irresponsible to suggest anything but more education to the OP. What educational service would you suggest for some one who started off with a desire to cross oceans with no boating experience.

Why the need to insult me? I merely pointed out the difficulty of taking the question seriously.
In the span of three days, we drove to Florida, got a survey done, closed on our first boat (42 grand banks), learned how to service the engines, and departed on a month-long trip from Fort Myers to Boston. We hired a captain for the first day; they taught us how to operate a boat as we crossed the Okeechobee.

There's no reason this question can't be taken seriously.
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Old 03-06-2019, 12:02 PM   #20
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In the span of three days, we drove to Florida, got a survey done, closed on our first boat (42 grand banks), learned how to service the engines, and departed on a month-long trip from Fort Myers to Boston. We hired a captain for the first day; they taught us how to operate a boat as we crossed the Okeechobee.

There's no reason this question can't be taken seriously.
With ZERO boating experience?
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