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Old 05-16-2012, 07:43 AM   #41
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I just don't like the wick burning heater/stoves as they have a tendency to need "attention" that non-techie, non-boaters staying might turn the boat into a soot factory .."

NO wick in any Dickinson I have ever seen.

NO wick in a Reflex either.

A proper install will operate unattended for long periods of time.

Requires "H" style smoke head , deck iron and big gravity fuel tank.

Have had no bad feedback on the Hurricane , tho like most a base board system uses loads less electric than kick heaters.

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Old 05-16-2012, 11:34 AM   #42
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I just don't like the wick burning heater/stoves as they have a tendency to need "attention" that non-techie, non-boaters staying might turn the boat into a soot factory .."

NO wick in any Dickinson I have ever seen.

NO wick in a Reflex either.

A proper install will operate unattended for long periods of time.

Requires "H" style smoke head , deck iron and big gravity fuel tank.

Have had no bad feedback on the Hurricane , tho like most a base board system uses loads less electric than kick heaters.

FF
sorry...there are a couple cheaper versions with wicks...you are correct about the pressurized stoves...but still I see an issue with the gravity feed (may still consider pump)...may just go for the hurricane for the unlimited hot shower...
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Old 05-16-2012, 12:35 PM   #43
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My preference is Propane. It is clean, and provides a safe flame. I know many feel that propane is dangerous because it is heavier than air. Well Alchohol is also very dangerous, it is a liquid, that can be spilled, it burns with an invisible flame and the smell makes me sick to my stomach. Besides propane burns hotter than alcohol.
There are millions of boats, RV's Trailers, etc that use propane with no ill effect. Add to that the number of homes that use propane as their primary fuel and you have a pretty good safety record.
More boats have explosions and fires from fueling and electrical problems than have ever been reported from propane.
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Old 05-16-2012, 07:25 PM   #44
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My preference is Propane. It is clean, and provides a safe flame. I know many feel that propane is dangerous because it is heavier than air. Well Alchohol is also very dangerous, it is a liquid, that can be spilled, it burns with an invisible flame and the smell makes me sick to my stomach. Besides propane burns hotter than alcohol.
There are millions of boats, RV's Trailers, etc that use propane with no ill effect. Add to that the number of homes that use propane as their primary fuel and you have a pretty good safety record.
More boats have explosions and fires from fueling and electrical problems than have ever been reported from propane.
Fine for cooking but serious heating for a liveaboard and I think propane would be a hassle to keep refilling..and kinda dumb when I have 400 gallons of home heating oil aboard...
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Old 05-17-2012, 06:09 AM   #45
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."but still I see an issue with the gravity feed:

Even this administration has not figured out how to limit and tax Gravity.

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Old 05-17-2012, 09:47 AM   #46
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Whoops, I saw stoves and misread the subject. Sorry,
As for heat, yes diesel is the way to go. We have the Webasco Hydronic heater system. Very happy with the performance. The boat is nice and warm and it helps keep the boat dry. Which up here is a major accomplishment.
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Old 05-17-2012, 10:24 AM   #47
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Anybody going to be at Trawler Fest in Anacortes on Saturday the 19th? If so, I'll see you there...

Even if you are presently single, it would be advisable to bring a SO/female along to get her like and dislikes as female tend to look at access, creature comforts and safety. Rather than boat stuff. Every long term live a board will tell you if the SO is not happy then no body is happy and it's going to be short term. Many live a board do not make it through the first winter and its usually the female that moves off the boat first. 50+ of the so called live a boards are live a boards during the warmer months.

So when talking to live a boards make sure you talk to year around live a boards, and talk to the females. My wife will be at Trawler Fest and she will not go on some boat as they are too hard to access, have steep stair, feels to confining. Looking at boats can be a great date and/or mini vacations.

Hope to see you there.
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Old 05-17-2012, 03:37 PM   #48
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Even if you are presently single, it would be advisable to bring a SO/female along to get her like and dislikes as female tend to look at access, creature comforts and safety. Rather than boat stuff. Every long term live a board will tell you if the SO is not happy then no body is happy and it's going to be short term. Many live a board do not make it through the first winter and its usually the female that moves off the boat first. 50+ of the so called live a boards are live a boards during the warmer months.

So when talking to live a boards make sure you talk to year around live a boards, and talk to the females. My wife will be at Trawler Fest and she will not go on some boat as they are too hard to access, have steep stair, feels to confining. Looking at boats can be a great date and/or mini vacations.

Hope to see you there.
Great point Phil. Women have a tendency to look at things from a much different point of view than us. Even though you are single those points of view will help to make your time aboard more or less enjoyable.
Living aboard during the summer months is great. But during the winter it is much more difficult. Simple tasks become extremely difficult sometimes. You need to do what every you can to make you life more comfortable to compensate for the other times. I would venture to guess that 70% of the people that move aboard don't last past the first year. They go into this with Rose colored glasses on and generally are discouraged, as Phil says, the first Winter.

There is a Live-A-Board forum. It may also give you some insight into living aboard and what to do to make it more comfortable.

Now don't get me wrong, I love living on the water most of the time. I could not get a home with the view I have. But just trying to give you both sides of the coin. I can come up with as many bad things about living on land as I can about living on the water. Just a decision you make and you take the bad with the good.
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Old 05-17-2012, 04:18 PM   #49
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Phil, point well taken about winter living. I imagine keeping everything warm and dry is a real struggle. Keeping the air moving and the temperature up has got to be key.

I am also a member of the live aboard forum. I figure I want to do this right the first time, rather than find out about all the problems after I dive into it.

Hardship doesn't bother me, as long as I know what to do about it!

Looking forward to Trawler Fest, see you there.
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Old 05-17-2012, 07:15 PM   #50
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Phil, point well taken about winter living. I imagine keeping everything warm and dry is a real struggle. Keeping the air moving and the temperature up has got to be key.

I am also a member of the live aboard forum. I figure I want to do this right the first time, rather than find out about all the problems after I dive into it.

Hardship doesn't bother me, as long as I know what to do about it!

Looking forward to Trawler Fest, see you there.


Do you mean Living Aboard Forums • Index page
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Old 05-17-2012, 07:59 PM   #51
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That's the one!
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Old 05-17-2012, 10:09 PM   #52
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"Best live aboard trawler for <$40,000?"

One that's worth $80,000
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Old 05-18-2012, 05:50 AM   #53
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For many wannabee live aboards the first winter is the killer.

It takes time and skill and a big bag of boat bucks to install a real useful/reliable heat system in a boat.

Start in April, no problem , start in Oct, youre gona freeze!
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Old 05-18-2012, 01:27 PM   #54
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For many wannabee live aboards the first winter is the killer.

It takes time and skill and a big bag of boat bucks to install a real useful/reliable heat system in a boat.

Start in April, no problem , start in Oct, youre gona freeze!
Even better to start with a boat that already had it installed.
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Old 05-18-2012, 01:49 PM   #55
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Even better to start with a boat that already had it installed.
Not really if I can install an 8 exchange and a Webasto, 90,000 btu, most anybody should be able to. However it does cost bucks for the Eagle it was 15 grand. Install was 10 to 20% the installer. The installer was required to bless the system and for the warranty. However, having the installer was worth every penny as he came by through out the installation to check progress and my work.

However, I agree even better to start with a boat that already had in stalled.
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Old 05-21-2012, 06:36 PM   #56
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Funny how 4 feet makes a world of difference when you only have 30 or 40 feet to work with, i look at it as my house v/s the % of increase in space that 4 feet would make on the boat then compute the same for your house its amazing what that % will do for your house likewise for your boat.
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Old 06-10-2012, 03:41 PM   #57
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I have been following this thread with interest, as I have nearly the exact same "wish list" as the original poster, the main difference being I am in New Orleans, so vessel heating is not really on my radar. Looking for similar vessel size (38-43), and price range (50K ish), with the understanding that the boat will need some work. Would like to make a yearly Bahamas, USVI, BVI, etc type of trip with family and friends (6 passengers or less, myself included).

Keep the advice flowing!!!!!
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:59 AM   #58
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The part that is most often overlooked is the beam. One foot in width is worth 4 feet in length as far as room goes.
There is generally more than enough work that someone will have to take on when they buy a boat. I don't care if it is new or used. That is just the nature of the business. So if you can find a boat with all the features and equipment that you want, that is a big plus. There is nothing, as Phil points out that you cannot do. The question is do you have the time and money to do it.
I find it much better to have someone else spend a fortune on adding things like heater, AC, generators, bow and stern thrusters, electronics, etc. Those are big ticket items and can bust a budget very quickly.
Just my opinion.
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:17 PM   #59
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The part that is most often overlooked is the beam. One foot in width is worth 4 feet in length as far as room goes.
There is generally more than enough work that someone will have to take on when they buy a boat. I don't care if it is new or used. That is just the nature of the business. So if you can find a boat with all the features and equipment that you want, that is a big plus. There is nothing, as Phil points out that you cannot do. The question is do you have the time and money to do it.
I find it much better to have someone else spend a fortune on adding things like heater, AC, generators, bow and stern thrusters, electronics, etc. Those are big ticket items and can bust a budget very quickly.
Just my opinion.
In my experience with my 3rd liveaboard and 8th boat...and having worked on hundreds of others...

Many owners and the vast majority of yards install stuff with NO thought on how it's gonna be repaired/replaced/checked etc....and put it wherever convenient FOR THEM so if you want to add a system....you wind up undoing the stuff already installed to add the new so it fits/works/all can be accessed in the future...

No thanks....the frustration/money spent doing myself pays off big dividends in the future.

Now if you can't do the work yourself for whatever reason...then yes...if a boat was well equipped from the start...you might be better off.
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Old 06-11-2012, 02:32 PM   #60
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In my experience with my 3rd liveaboard and 8th boat...and having worked on hundreds of others...

Many owners and the vast majority of yards install stuff with NO thought on how it's gonna be repaired/replaced/checked etc....and put it wherever convenient FOR THEM so if you want to add a system....you wind up undoing the stuff already installed to add the new so it fits/works/all can be accessed in the future...

No thanks....the frustration/money spent doing myself pays off big dividends in the future.

Now if you can't do the work yourself for whatever reason...then yes...if a boat was well equipped from the start...you might be better off.
This is one of the main reasons I have chosen to build my own boat, with my own stumpy little hands.I have total control of every inch of the layout.If I have an issue with it,I can change it before it becomes a nightmare.If after the boat is finished,and I have an issue,I will have to take myself out behind the wood shed.
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