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Old 11-17-2015, 11:33 AM   #141
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Originally Posted by healhustler View Post
Agree with Autumn Dream (also love the boat).

Over the last three years, I've probably lived aboard half of that time, working on many projects both in and out of the water, at marinas, yards, and in our slip in back of our main residence. Most of the reason I want to be aboard is to be rid of the material that one tends to collect on land. I got rid of everything I owned in '97 and then married to a woman who is now going through the same process with an overwhelming collection of stuff. She doesn't know what it's like to be free of all that stuff, and there's no way to tell her about it. When you're aboard and you wake up one morning....maybe six months later and you just had a dream about saving, protecting, insuring, storing, displaying, polishing, mowing, trimming, giving, receiving, scratching, denting, repairing, collecting, calling somebody about or getting a call about, or the plethora of other concerns that come up when possessing "stuff", you will shake your head to clear it before saying, "Oh yeah, I don't have to worry about that anymore". Surrounded by the tranquility of the world you chose only a short time before, you'll smile and lie back to enjoy this strangest of moments,,,,one filled with absence and gratification.
Well said. The quip: "Getting rid of stuff is liberating." rings true, but your reminders of all the intrusions that are brought into our lives by "stuff" says it best.
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Old 11-17-2015, 11:38 AM   #142
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Old 11-17-2015, 11:54 AM   #143
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Regrets

Took the plunge in 1999 and cruised for 5 years. No regrets, but the ones we met that did regret it put it off until they were on the down side of spry. Cruising and living aboard is easier when things work well without groaning, but harder to take up later. Met many octogenarians who had been cruising for years and no problems, but starting out late seemed to be a big hurdle.

We have since down sized and bought a house until grandkids are a little older to spend time with them outside of vacations, but still spend as much time aboard as possible in Michigan.

If you do it and hate it, you can always go back, no shame in that.
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Old 11-23-2015, 06:45 AM   #144
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Took the plunge in 1999 and cruised for 5 years. No regrets, but the ones we met that did regret it put it off until they were on the down side of spry. Cruising and living aboard is easier when things work well without groaning, but harder to take up later. Met many octogenarians who had been cruising for years and no problems, but starting out late seemed to be a big hurdle.

We have since down sized and bought a house until grandkids are a little older to spend time with them outside of vacations, but still spend as much time aboard as possible in Michigan.

If you do it and hate it, you can always go back, no shame in that.

I am curious...what would you and others consider on "the down side of spry"? My wife and I want to move aboard after retirement but don't want to wait too late.
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Old 11-23-2015, 01:56 PM   #145
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I think that is something that has a different point for everyone, and you know it even though you may not want to admit it. I am 60 and have been crawling around boats for 50+ years so it is no problem. It does not take someone being in great shape to live aboard, but you have to be able to navigate more confined spaces, that sometimes are not level, that may be slippery and may require the ability to lift anchors, throw lines etc. It is a more physical lifestyle than life on the hard. Simple things like getting groceries can sometimes include a long walk or bike ride to a store. Maintenance, getting in and out of the dinghy, the engine room and even showering can all have challenges you do not find ashore. Many have it well into their 80's and beyond, some are ill suited at 25. We found that it was easier to make the transition for younger folks than those who waited until they had some of the challenges we all face as we age. A lot of it has to do with attitude also. I am sure that training for a marathon has many wondering if it is worth it. The rewards far outweigh any discomfort or extra needed effort we encounter.
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Old 11-25-2015, 05:57 PM   #146
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Change is constant

There is no right answer. There is only the right answer for you. And that right answer can change.

My husband and I are planning to do the Great Loop in a couple of years after he retires. We have no plans or desire to do anything but coastal cruising. BUT, we don't know that for sure, do we? We might love it so much we never come back to land. We may hate it halfway around the loop and never go back to the boat. That's just the chance we're willing to take. :-)

In regards to real estate appreciating? My husband bought a condo in Houston in 1980. He moved cities a few years later and rented it out for the next 15+ years. The rent NEVER covered the mortgage, insurance, taxes plus HOA fees. We sold it 20 years later and wrote a check for half the purchase price. Extreme example? Sure. But, true.

In 1997, we bought our first townhouse together. We sold it 5 years later and brought a check to closing to pay off the difference.

We may be the worst real estate buyers in the history of the world. :-) But, don't tell me real estate 'always' appreciates. Luckily, we have actually made money on other homes.

And here's a quote worth thinking about "We avoid risks in life in order to make it safely to death."
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Old 12-17-2015, 11:58 AM   #147
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No Regrets Yet

I am planning on living aboard in about a year and a half, sooner if I can.
I have a nice 1800 sq ft house on a large lake in Florida. My Home Value (EQUITY) Lost 35% over the last 5 years. Yea I'm Ready to get rid of that anchor.

Watch out for submerged objects or crafts.
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Old 08-16-2016, 10:48 PM   #148
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Interesting comparison, in this thread about the $$ comparing living on land and in a boat. My two cents, I have lived on land, had a career, owned houses, made money lost money. I have recently retired and am able to buy a boat which I have done, move aboard and cruise. So why wouldn't I?? Because I will loose equity in a house if I sell it?? I will loose money in depreciation on a boat?? If money is your motivation, stay on the hard in your house. And then at that magical age move into a rest home and play bingo. If you want a new life style and an adventure while you are able that most only dream of then forget about the $$, buy a boat move on it, pull up anchor and move on with your life and don't look back. It probably doesn't make sense, but what adventure does in life? Forget about trying to make $$ sense of it. It will drive you crazy and the bottom line is it probably doesn't make $$ sense. But do something crazy, you have worked hard for it and the opportunity to act crazy. You will regret it if you don't when you are setting at that bingo table...........
Great post!
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Old 08-17-2016, 12:09 AM   #149
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Hi,we second that.
You can either call it SKI-ing, 'Spending the Kids Inheritance', or, 'Adventure before Dementia' but who needs an excuse anyway ?
It's exactly what we did and you can follow us as we're 'Living Your Dreams'.
For our 2015 journey take a look on 'Boaters and voyagers on the go', 'Ireland to the Mediterranean Part 1',
For this years adventure look at 'Windmills and Wine' which I'll update over the next few days.
The reason I point it out is not to be smug or a smart a*se but simply to give you encouragement and inspiration.
The very best of Irish luck for your future.
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Old 08-17-2016, 12:21 PM   #150
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rpeterson View Post
Interesting comparison, in this thread about the $$ comparing living on land and in a boat. My two cents, I have lived on land, had a career, owned houses, made money lost money. I have recently retired and am able to buy a boat which I have done, move aboard and cruise. So why wouldn't I?? Because I will loose equity in a house if I sell it?? I will loose money in depreciation on a boat?? If money is your motivation, stay on the hard in your house. And then at that magical age move into a rest home and play bingo. If you want a new life style and an adventure while you are able that most only dream of then forget about the $$, buy a boat move on it, pull up anchor and move on with your life and don't look back. It probably doesn't make sense, but what adventure does in life? Forget about trying to make $$ sense of it. It will drive you crazy and the bottom line is it probably doesn't make $$ sense. But do something crazy, you have worked hard for it and the opportunity to act crazy. You will regret it if you don't when you are setting at that bingo table...........
Excellent point. We are now wrapping up our first four months living aboard. Yes, we sold it all and made the Big Move with no dirt home attachments. Although the $$ is certainly something to consider - I agree with rpeterson. The lifestyle is not that much different in total cost of ownership. It is impossible to explain how rewarding it is in personal satisfaction.

One thing touched on in this thread is the partnership, marriage or not it doesn't seem to matter. What is dramatically different among the couples we've met is their relationship. We have been emotionally overwhelmed visiting with couples who truly treasure each other. One word, respect. We see a sense of partnership, equality and profound respect for each other you just don't witness at the local yearly Christmas party.

And - this is what we are discovering. This commitment, this adventure is a passion. It's more than painting the shutters together. We've already been in some hairy situations - thank God we held it together. And yes, at the end of the day, a cocktail on the bridge with Shangri-La safely in her slip is indeed, priceless.

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Old 08-17-2016, 01:22 PM   #151
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I first replied to this thread nearly two years ago with 9,000 miles in my wake and 18 months on board.
Now, with over 16,000 miles and over three years I still have no regrets.

I now spend my winters in the Bahamas and Summer's somewhere north. Still having fun.
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Old 08-19-2016, 09:55 PM   #152
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My only regrets are ever living in a house, neighborhood, city.
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Old 08-20-2016, 11:53 AM   #153
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Another year. 19 years we been a live a board with no regrets except we are another year older. Few more wrinkles, grey hair and not as spry and strong. We both retired and since we are a live aboard, we bought a motor home, and vacationing away from the boat and not leaving the dock much.

Being my wife is partially disabled and each year a little more, we have discussed about being able to live on the boat. We decided to live on the boat during the warm summer months and be winter Texans during the colder rainy months. However in time we will have to make some modification to the boat and a easier boarding slip. The modification would be 2 side stern gates, we have one center swim deck gate. Also we need to find a retired couple in the area to help crew the boat as its getting to big for the two of us.

People say we don't show our age and have a easy freindly view of live, which we attribute to being a live aboard as it requires a active lifestyle.
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Old 08-20-2016, 12:07 PM   #154
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We are now nearing the end of our 1st Inside Passage trip and 2 1/2 years as a live a board and the wife and I are loving it.
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Old 08-20-2016, 05:26 PM   #155
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Beautiful, thanks for finding that, but ironically the very picture and sound of regret.
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Old 10-30-2016, 02:15 PM   #156
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When my wife passed I took a long hard look at what I planned to do from then on. Six months later I quit my job, sold my house and everything in it, my 3 motorcycles, and my two cars, and bought a 34' sailboat (Read my blog httThe Roaming Nomad)
This month I sold my sailboat and bought a trawler, the beauty seen at left. I will never buy a house... I will co-habitate with someone else for a while.

You know what they say: "Always be yourself, unless you can be a Pirate, then always be a Pirate."
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Old 10-30-2016, 04:35 PM   #157
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You know what they say: "Always be yourself, unless you can be a Pirate, then always be a Pirate."
Actually, that was Batman. Always, always be Batman

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Old 11-01-2016, 11:15 AM   #158
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Actually, that was Batman. Always, always be Batman
Works with pirates, too.
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Old 11-01-2016, 12:28 PM   #159
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Reading this thread made me think about one regret... I regret not to be RETIRED yet to be able to spend more time aboard!
Than looking through the window I thought about another regret... I regret to have to winterize my boat instead of being able to use it all year round.

When we got our first boat early this year, my wife and I did not know what to expect. We wanted to get a first experience of living aboard to see if we may like it enough to do the jump to a permanent live aboard. Obviously we spent 1 week and all weekend aboard, cruising or at the anchor, and what looked obvious to us is that we just love it and now that the season up here is over we cannot wait to get back on cruise next year.

But most of all I think I do not have enough experience to regret anything.
For now no bad luck, not drama so everything looks good to us, maybe one day things will make the answer different but just we are just hoping that everything will stay as it is now as it is delightful for us.

Side note: Autumn Dream, you boat is very nice
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