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Old 10-07-2014, 02:48 PM   #21
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No regrets at all?

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Old 10-07-2014, 03:23 PM   #22
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That movie cracked me up . Had to watch it twice .We are at the boat at least three times a week . Boat is only twenty minutes from home . I'm still working but would like to try the full time thang someday . This is not the right boat , time or location just yet . I think selling out and being totally committed would be the only way it would work for us .
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Old 10-07-2014, 05:06 PM   #23
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My wife and I are aboard five years now. Sold the dirt house last month. Huge move to downsize and keep the boot stripe above water. We will be cutting the dock lines soon. Just waiting for Medicare to kick in. Boat is about the way I want it.
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:36 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by obthomas View Post
My wife and I are aboard five years now. Sold the dirt house last month. Huge move to downsize and keep the boot stripe above water. We will be cutting the dock lines soon. Just waiting for Medicare to kick in. Boat is about the way I want it.
Awesome! Enjoy your journey
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:43 PM   #25
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You are making a big assumption on that. A lot of people are still underwater on their home purchases and there is the possibility of future price deflation not to mention real estate taxes, mortgage interest, home owners insurance, maintenance, landscaping and yard care, HOA fees, water, sewage, electricity and the like. IMHO, real estate is over hyped and over rated.
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Old 10-07-2014, 09:05 PM   #26
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As With most things in life, living aboard is a question of balance; regrets/rewards.

For me,
Regrets; none so far, other than maybe having not done it sooner.
However, a close runner up to regrets, “reality bites” should also be a serious consideration.

How often, will in reality, will you be able to take your boat/home out of her slip. Quite often, it's a pretty major effort for a liveaboard to take the boat out just for an afternoon cruise. Most of the time it requires securing your boat so that if you take a wave/wake, your "home" below doesn't go flying all over the cabin/galley/staterooms. If you’re not going out for a least a day or two, it’s usually more effort than it’s worth. I suspect that after some time, a lot of liveaboards are disappointed with the amount of time they actually get their boats out "on the water".

Also, living aboard involves a lot of hard work, bumps and bruises. Unless you can buy a “newer” boat, there will always be something that needs fixin’, sometimes major, sometimes minor. Your first inclination will be to try to fix it yourself (hence the bumps and bruises). Depending on your comfort level of the project it can be quite frustrating or quite rewarding. But it’s how you will learn the important systems of your “baby”.

Living aboard also requires lots of hoops to jump through logistically.


The flip side of regrets; REWARDS
Like today, being down in the engine room all day and coming up to a beautiful Indian Summer evening.
And having the marina pretty much to yourself to enjoy the peace and quiet.

Also, the comfort of knowing that you’re satisfied with your boat /home with the way it is (for now) and that she’s ready to go cruising. Once you get bitten by the cruising bug, you will most likely start planning your next “voyage” as soon as you get back (if indeed you do come back). The planning is part of the fun.

As far as being a “vagabond”, well, can’t help you there. I’m going to the Keys/Bahamas for 7 months just cruising around and island hopping, mostly just diving and fishing. No set itinerary or schedule, just rough dates. I’ll be anchoring out most of the time, yet I don’t consider myself a "vagabond". Unless you mean full time cruisers, or serious long term travelers like Mr. Larry M of Hobo and others, I don't think we have any real "vagabonds' here.

As for marital bliss, the couple that lives aboard in the slip next to me have their good and bad days with some rather “loud” exchanges on their bad days, but no more so than the folks that lived next door to me on terra firma. They've been liveaboard full time cruisers for three years and are just stopping here for medical reasons.

Living on a boat would be a major change in lifestyle for most folks, and it’s not for everyone. Think of how many boats are in your marina, and how many of them are liveaboards, that is if your marina even allows them.

There is really only one way to find out if it’s suitable for you. KJ


Indian Summer evening
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Old 10-07-2014, 10:27 PM   #27
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Old 10-08-2014, 09:37 PM   #28
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I have lived aboard a Westsail 32 sailboat, a Morgan 46 sailboat, a Bluewater 47 Motoryacht and a C&C 57 sailboat. All the sailboats were in the Caribbean Sea or New England and Florida. The Bluewater was in Florida. I was in my 30's and 40's ans single when I did this. I am currently preparing to move aboard a Pilgrim 40 for hopefully a 2-3 year stint of living aboard and travel on the East Coast doing a snowbird thing.
Are you still single or doing this married? Being married can make a huge difference in living aboard. Single guys, at least the ones I know, typically can make the live aboard life work whereas married couples tend to like to collect more comforts of home making for more stuff and needing a larger boat.

Just my observations
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Old 10-09-2014, 05:51 AM   #29
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Are you still single or doing this married? Being married can make a huge difference in living aboard. Single guys, at least the ones I know, typically can make the live aboard life work whereas married couples tend to like to collect more comforts of home making for more stuff and needing a larger boat.

Just my observations
There's the magic word for anyone living aboard and the word that blows the "buy the smallest boat" theory pretty much out of the water.

If ANYONE, single, married, male, female....COLLECTS stuff....living aboard becomes an issue at some point. Unless you have a homebase that you visit and drop off the "collectables" on a regular basis.

While being married doesn't mean you need 2X the room that a single person needs...it does complicate the formula depending on the want and desires that the second person comes with. My girlfriend came with a Golden Retriever...while I didn't want a dog aboard it just worked out that way. One of the biggest issues is floor space and a dog stretched out is a tripping hazard to older people, especially when the numbers get above 4 in the main saloon...just not enough room.

When I was boat shopping...I considered 36 foot trawlers...then the brain did the math beyond just "costs" and realized the "price". I knew if I bought a 36 and then had another person join me in my adventure the world would have closed in way too much...

My 40 seems 3-4 feet too small. The next size up allows that washer/dryer....and a few more liveaboard conveniences to be installed without REALLY being an engineering issue or storage space gobbler.
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Old 10-09-2014, 07:06 AM   #30
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We live aboard a 44' boat (40 with a 4' cockpit) for four months per year. Look forward to the Spring launch....and the Fall haul out. Be very careful about selling the dirt residence.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:09 PM   #31
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I bought my first house when I was 25 and owned homes and property all my life. I am now 68 bought a boat that I can live on (48' Kadey Krogen). Will shortly have my LAST house up for sale, plan on moving aboard in March 2015. Travel plans are a trip to Alaska next summer, then down to San Diego by Oct. to meet up with the Baja ha ha group and on to Mexico. I have a friend that did the same thing 2 years ago and he keeps emailing me, "come find me"...all I know is he is somewhere in the Caribbean. My wife and I sold our business a year ago in anticipation of this move. We have worked together in the same office for years so we know we can get along. I look at it as just another phase in my life, that I would regret if I didn't do it now that I have the opportunity. We can always move back to the hard, but all I know when I am on the boat I sleep like a baby, and am content getting up in the morning setting on the flybridge with a cup of coffee, watching the ocean and wildlife, the ocean is so alive compared to the subdivision and city that I live in. It makes me see life in a different perspective. Yes I will give up a way of life that is very comfortable, but life is suppose to be an adventure, otherwise it is boring. Don't let the pull of the comforts of the land and your home hold you back. There is just no way with the opportunity, I can not do it. Nor can you.....go for it, you will regret it if you don't. See you in the Caribbean next year!
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:36 PM   #32
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Thanks rpeterson. I am going do it. Having the comforts of a home and "stuff" is fun but I am looking for adventure and excitement.
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Old 10-10-2014, 12:53 PM   #33
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We are seriously considering the options - first to find a boat we can afford to own and live aboard. Found a few that we want to go take a look at.

We have worked together for 25 years (yes - even as 2 engineers) so no worries about that. I know "my place" and we each have our own areas that we are responsible for on the boat, and consult together when we have issues.

All the suggestions and advise are great. Fortunately we already have rules in place about "stuff" - even in the house. Collections are slowly being sold or given away as we find we don't need all the stuff we have. When to retire (early!!!!) is the next consideration.

We know what we really need to be happy, and it isn't much, but it needs to be sound, and comfortable.

It sounds like everyone has very different definitions of live-aboard as well. We do not want to move from our house (on the water) to a boat tied to a slip in a single location. Might as well stay in the house. The dream is to cruise, spending time at each location as it pleases (and the weather cooperates), heading south in the winters and getting out of hurricane zones in the season. So, if we sold the house, full-time cruisers are what we would become!
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Old 10-10-2014, 01:17 PM   #34
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Autumn Dream, just a thought, before we bought out boat, we did a lot of "bare boat" vacations. Where you just rent the boat and go, no captain. We did it in both Mexico and the Caribbean. We made a point of renting different boats. Here in the Pacific Northwest there are companies where you can lease/rent boats for a week or longer. They are private boats that the owners rent out. They have all shapes and sizes to try. We found once we were out on the water for a week or longer we found what we really needed of the boat to make us comfortable. You just can not walk-on a boat a visualize yourself living on it. Then once you find the right boat, then comes the task of finding one for sale for the right price and in good shape. That took us most of a year. We, like you wanted a boat that didn't limit us to where we could go. We did not want to trade living in a house to living in a marina. I just wouldn't do that. We will be cruisers so we needed a boat that would take us where we wanted to go and be comfortable. We found a Kadey Krogen that we could afford. It will take us anywhere in the world. A 42 left Mexico this spring and their first stop was French Polynesia they are going on to Australia. Another left Nova Scotia and first stop the Azores. Not making a sales pitch for a KK but we found that is the kind of boat we needed. A true "Blue water boat" not a coastal cruiser. Tragedy would be going through all of this and then be limited by the boat we bought. Our boat broker asked us "first decide what you want to do with the boat" and then look for a boat that will do it. If all you want is to stay in sight of land there are a lot of boats that are great live boards, but if you want to go further than that there is another class of boat to consider. A lot of decisions, good luck!
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Old 10-10-2014, 09:09 PM   #35
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Regrets? Not a single one. I sold everything that didn't need to be on the boat, downsized big time. I've been living and traveling full time for the last sixteen months, 9,000 miles plus, and I am enjoying every day. I have more friends now than at any time in my life. I meet new people almost every day.

This is not "camping out". It is living in a small two bedroom, two bath house with a great and constantly changing view. If you want upscale, there are marinas for that. Like camping, stay at a state dock attached to a campground. The "live aboard" life can be anything you want it to be.

Even if it all ended tomorrow, and I truly hope that it doesn't. I would not regret a minute.

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Old 10-13-2014, 09:30 AM   #36
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never regretted a minute of it. My only regrets are not doing it sooner in life. I am going on 68 and the admiral is 74.

My suggestion would be to NOT sell your present boat first. Live and cruise on it for at least a year or two. Then you will be in a better position to know what your final boat #1 will be.

We started living aboard on a Catalina 25 sailboat and then went to a Catalina 30, which was our final boat #1. It was totaled in Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Then we went to an Allied 39 ketch rigged Sailboat. About 2 years ago, the admiral had come down with a degenerative lung disorder and then thyroid problems. She didn't want sail anymore and didn't want to give up cruising and living aboard so here we are on our final boat #3 in about 12 years time - a Mainship 36 aft cabin model.

Tough it out on your present boat for a while. Then decide on what you really want - at least for that point in time. You will make a much better decision. Each size, whether larger or small, has it's own set of advantages and disadvantages. Only you know what will fit you best.

I will be sending the OP my cell number.

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Old 10-20-2014, 12:44 AM   #37
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Any regrets? Loosing future equity in house is my only BIG hang up.
That would be my big hang-up too. We had a home built on our 5-acre parcel in Port Orchard 14 years ago. Today, despite the economic turmoil, our property value is nearly double our original loan amount. I believe that is fairly typical in most parts of the country. (Such as, I suspect, most parts of Auburn!)

I, too, am considering purchasing a 40-ish footer for a retirement cruiser and as a "transitional liveaboard." In 5 years our home will be paid off and we will be completely debt-free. Our youngest child will also be off to college (paid for Dave Ramsey-style with ESAs and scholarships/self-funding/a job) by that time as well. So between now and then, I am contemplating saving up for the boat.

At that point, my wife and I would rent out our current home (possibly through a property manager) and live aboard the boat for about four years in order to save up enough money to pay cash to build our retirement home on another corner of our acreage. That's the 10-year plan anyway. After that, we'll still have the boat for cruises up the Inside Passage for another 10 or 20 years (unless we're absolutely sick of the boat by then!)

As a bonus, we will still have our fairly large shop as a land base, with a chest freezer, large refrigerator, and ample heated storage. That won't be rented out with the house.

Nothing is set in stone at this point, so I am very interested in learning about people's possible regrets. Though most of the feedback has been fairly positive so far. I join the original poster with appreciation for the insights from those who have done it--the ups and downs that we still on the hard have yet to experience.

Thanks!
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Old 11-03-2014, 06:40 PM   #38
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Regrets, just one

My only regret is that we didn't do it sooner. We sold a big house, moved half way across the country. 2 1/2 years on the "soft" and it is still sweet. Of course, I have the perfect wife. Never any tension until the heads start acting up. I keep my marine plumber on speed dial.
Good Luck!!
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:07 PM   #39
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"I wish I would have done it sooner"

I was already convinced I was making the right decision to sell my house (full of this so called equity) and jump onto a boat... self employment does that to you I guess

Just do it, and don't have any regrets. Isn't regret just another form of not being content? If you can't be content with what you have now, I'd say a boat will just make things worse.
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Old 11-03-2014, 09:32 PM   #40
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"I wish I would have done it sooner"

I was already convinced I was making the right decision to sell my house (full of this so called equity) and jump onto a boat... self employment does that to you I guess

Just do it, and don't have any regrets. Isn't regret just another form of not being content? If you can't be content with what you have now, I'd say a boat will just make things worse.
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regret
noun
1. a sense of loss, disappointment, dissatisfaction, etc.
2. a feeling of sorrow or remorse for a fault, act, loss, disappointment, etc.
Houses go up in value. Boats go down in value.

That makes a house an investment and a boat the proverbial hole in the water into which one throws money.

I still love 'em though!
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