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Old 07-07-2013, 06:49 PM   #1
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1998 mainship 34 motor yacht

Hi. I'm new to this forum but someone I met on the water recommended this yesterday.
My question is about a boat I'm very interested in buying but have no experience with a larger boat like this. I currently rock a Bennington pontoon and am selling it next month. My fiancÚ and I love boating so much that we would like to spend more time on the water and not have to run back to the marina at sunset.
It's been clearly put that AFTER our wedding in January is when I can buy this boat, so I'm in the planning phase.
The boat I really like is a 1996-1998 mainship 34 motor yacht. Any advice would be much appreciated. I plan on keeping it at a marina with a floating dock and shore power. We don't do much off shore stuff, mainly inter-coastal cruising and sand bar swimming but would like to expand into different experiences like visiting new cities, marinas, cruising clubs, etc. Would this be a nice boat for that or does anyone have another model I should check out maybe. We aren't go fast people, we'd rather take it slow and entertain friends.
Thanks for any help!
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Old 07-08-2013, 06:12 AM   #2
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At the local marina see if you can beg a ride on a similar size and style boat.

Pontoon boats have a totally different motion , underway and anchored.
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Old 07-08-2013, 06:58 PM   #3
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Great idea. I'm sure it'd be a big welcome aboard. Its exciting this is taking shape.

Another question. 454 EFI's or Yanmar diesels? Everyone says diesels and I can find this thing with both. Diesels are about 15k more in these years. Worth it?
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Old 07-08-2013, 08:28 PM   #4
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If covering a lot of miles is your main objective buy one with diesels. If you plan to stay in the marina, take short local trips and occasionally go long get gas. You can afford more boat (fun) with gas engines. I prefer freshwater cooled EFI versus raw water cooled...
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Old 07-08-2013, 09:12 PM   #5
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If you buy gas make sure the engines are EFI. Better economy and easier maintenance.

I have gas motors and they are fast but burn some fuel.

It depends on your long term goal on the boat. Me, I'm trading up in a year or so.
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Old 07-08-2013, 09:20 PM   #6
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bglad summed it up quite nicely in my opinion.

My "personal" guidepost is under 35 feet either works fine, after 35 feet I "personally" would only consider diesel. I have a gas engine and no regrets, diesel would be nice too but is it worth the extra money?? At this point in my boating life, no. I'm a short trip boater with less than 15 miles ran in a typical day/weekend. In other words, we use our boat similar to what you described in your first post.

Diesel is inherently safer as it is not explosive, and that is enough for some folks to only own a diesel boat. Gas needs extra vigilance on your part assuring your system is leak free and in good repair. Be mindful of running bilge blowers and ventilating your engine space properly. Gas engines are also cheaper to replace if something catastrophic goes wrong internally, broken crank or such. Rare, but could happen.
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Old 07-08-2013, 11:17 PM   #7
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I believe I looked at a similar boat when we were boat shopping. If it's the same boat it was powered by twin Yanmars and would cruise effortlessly at 18 kts. I do believe they made the boat in both gas and diesel versions.

This boat has tons of room for it's size. It is a coastal cruiser and not a blue water boat. It has a walk through helm in that you access the deck via the bridge and not the sides of the boat. This I think is unique to Mainship.

Gas engines are much much cheaper to repair or replace.
Diesel engines if taken care of will last much longer than gas.
Diesel fuel is much safer than gas as diesel fumes will not as likely explode.
A diesel generator does not emit CO gas.
A diesel engine is slightly more fuel efficient for the same HP.

Most engines on boats in the size range we're discussing are gas and very few have exploded.
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Old 07-09-2013, 07:45 AM   #8
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Diesel engines and generators most certainly DO generate carbon monoxide.
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Old 07-09-2013, 08:41 AM   #9
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Diesel engines and generators most certainly DO generate carbon monoxide.
Yes Keith is correct, however I believe the CO emitted by diesel engines is around 1 -10% of a gas engine. CO is the result of incomplete combustion.

That said I have a 120v CO detector in addition to the 3 permanently mounted DC CO detectors on my diesel powered boat with diesel generator.
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Old 07-09-2013, 10:31 AM   #10
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"Diesels are about 15k more in these years. Worth it?"

Not to 99% of boaters , except to strut the dock.

Gas is far cheaper to buy , maintain and keep in great operating condition.

A new engine may cost less than a half set of electric diesel injectors.

Should you be different and operate 2000 hours a year , instead of the optomistic 200hrs thought to be the pleasure norm, sure diesel is a better answer.

For a trawler lifestyle 6K- 7K cruise Gas would always be first choice.

Now if the boat were 50+ tons , and was used for long ocean passages diesel would be a better choice as the diesel fuel will be more distance per tank, and out of the USA gas delivered to docks is less common and way more expen$ive.
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Old 07-09-2013, 08:43 PM   #11
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How many hours of maintenance per week would you say you put into your boat, while on the dock and plugged into shore power? I'm not talking upgrades, but mainly cleaning, engine/diagnostic checks, etc? I know you can hire this out, but is it feasibly, easily doable with the right knowledge?
What would be recommended for a first time motor yacht owner?
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Old 07-10-2013, 11:00 AM   #12
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I think for many on this forum we do as much maintenance as we can and hire out those thinks we can't or don't want to do. You will find most of the folks here are hands on types.
I have no idea how many hours I spend per week. I fix things when they need it and change oil and wax on a schedule. However, I do spend a fair about of time working on the boat, far more than using it.
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Old 07-10-2013, 05:37 PM   #13
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I think a 34' motoryacht would serve your purposes just fine.
Good luck in your quest.
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:00 PM   #14
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How many hours of maintenance per week would you say you put into your boat, while on the dock and plugged into shore power? I'm not talking upgrades, but mainly cleaning, engine/diagnostic checks, etc? I know you can hire this out, but is it feasibly, easily doable with the right knowledge?
What would be recommended for a first time motor yacht owner?
Depends...

How anal are you? I'm more than average for my marina according to the staff. I wash exterior and detail interior at least monthly 4hrs total. Wax will be annually perhaps 10 hrs. Mechanical maintenance inspection/checks 1hr per month. Swim the hull to clean bottom every trip.

Most of the folks at my marina hose it off before using.

Everyone has a different agenda, none of them are wrong as long as you're enjoying it.
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:38 PM   #15
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That is so funny. The folks at the marina say the same about me. I'm there any chance I have to clean and perfect, however, it's a Bennington pontoon and I ran out of things to do. I've upgraded everything I can and it seems like the only thing left to do is go up a story. I'm an inventive guy and will get a thrill out of spending time at the marina. Glad others are the same way - thought I was a little obsessive but I really do enjoy tinkering on my boat. I've got a friend that manages a yacht services company and when you add up the cleaning, washing, waxing, engine inspections and hull scraping - it's more than your monthly dockage fee. So if I can do most or all of these things myself, I can save about $800/month and enjoy my time doing it. I love in SW FL so maybe in the hot summer months a service or two wouldn't be a bad move to outsource to stay out of the heat.
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Old 07-11-2013, 05:28 AM   #16
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"What would be recommended for a first time motor yacht owner?"

No external wood to maintain.

Avoid "teak decks" like the plague, as the chance the structure under them is rotten is high .

The repair is more than a minor operation..
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:59 PM   #17
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I was like you and was bashful about getting into a larger boat. I googled boating schools and found a 'school' in Fort Myers, Fla. So I spent a week on a 39' Mainsail and had a dedicated instructor who is a retired Navy Captain, Annapolis grad who teaches folks like me for coins and grins. Money very well spent for me. Suggest you consider something similar.

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Old 08-30-2013, 11:02 AM   #18
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Alan,
Can you provide the name of the school in Florida? Thanks
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:20 PM   #19
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I wash exterior and detail interior at least monthly 4hrs total. I have it done every two weeks. Wax will be annually perhaps 10 hrs. Every 8 months on my boat. Mechanical maintenance inspection/checks 1hr per month. Swim the hull to clean bottom every trip. Are you kidding?

Most of the folks at my marina hose it off before using. I hose it off with deionized water after every cruise.
And I thought I was bad!
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Old 08-30-2013, 01:32 PM   #20
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And I thought I was bad!
Lol Walt. I can see I have to step up my game a bit I get away with annual waxing because of the covered berth


??? Where to hook up the deionized water...
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