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Old 01-09-2008, 12:10 PM   #21
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RE: Your boating history...

Thanks.* BTW, the flybridge photo has President Washington's home, Mt. Vernon, in the background.
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Old 01-09-2008, 06:21 PM   #22
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Your boating history...

Hey RTF,

I have always said, "If you can't tie a knot, tie a LOT!!!".
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Old 01-10-2008, 07:07 PM   #23
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RE: Your boating history...

I'll start my tale. It's amazing how many of us had early canoe experience. My first boating was building rafts from wood on the beach of Camano Is. I was 10 or 11. All I needed was a can of rusty and bent nails and a hammer. I'd drag the wood from beheind the logs to half tide level where I would begin my craft. By the time the rising tide floated my craft I was at least half done.The rest of the building was completed afloat with the rest of the pieces one end on the raft and the other end floating. Power was from the longest pole I could find. I probably made about 15 of these unsofisticated craft. My next marine endevor was academic. I rode my bycycle to the University Library ( in Seattle ) and devoured the boating books there. I remember well reading many by William Atkin so I knew what a boat should be like at 11. A block down the street was Seattle Sporting Goods and they always had several new 8' prams out front for $49. At about 12
I bought a kit kayak for $19.95. It was a box of canvas, spruce sticks, thousands of copper tacks and a can of aircraft dope. I built the flimsy thing ( 28 lbs and 12' long ) and paddled it a lot off the beach of Camano Is. Many of us dudes in the Seattle area began courting girls in canoes rented from the U of W in the Aboretum. We frequently came in very late ( after dark ) and in the darkness we learned new boating skills and other new skills. Clark tipped his canoe over and I still think he did it on purpose to demonstrate the high level of new skills he had achieved. At that time in life I spent my spare time ( and a lot of the rest ) on cars and all that goes with them, including more girl skills. Did'nt get far.... no not the girls... the history. Later
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Old 01-12-2008, 06:22 PM   #24
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RE: Your boating history...

Grew up in Memphis and got interested in sailing through a "pond yacht" (about a 30 inch sail boat) that I used to take out to a lake in the then outskirts of town.* Fast forward to New Orleans in 1968 and a chance to sail on a race boat in Lake Ponchartrain.* 40 some odd years later, having sailed about 18,000 miles offshore and at least that much more around the marks and progressing from main trimmer to jib trimmer to foredeck to navigator to celestial navigator and return skipper, I've finally decided to come over to the "dark side" and join the sybarites.*

I've sailed on boats from 22 to 65 feet (bigger is better) and have owned a total of eight sailboats from 14 to 25 feet.* Being on the water is what's important and being able to do it "inside", out of the weather, and being able to go directly toward my destination with little or no concern of wind direction while being comfortable has won me over.

I'm looking (hard) for a boat of from 36 to 44 feet.*
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Old 01-13-2008, 04:56 PM   #25
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RE: Your boating history...

Dark Side,

Bigger is better? I think there is a size thats perfect for all of us but I know many of us don't have that size boat. Boats take a huge amount of energy, money and time not to mention marriages, jobs and other side effects. I have a 30' boat and I'm scared to even think of bigger. Maby thats a strong indication I've got a boat thats too big. Big boats are just too much trouble. Much of the time I wish I had my 25' Albin back. I have rowboats, canoes, kayaks and a 19' OB. After I've had my Willard a few more years I'll have to reflect on how much I accomplished with each and the most important question, the bottom line, how much fun I had with each. There's only one person on this site that has given strong indication that he has the perfect boat.

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Old 01-13-2008, 06:59 PM   #26
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RE: Your boating history...

And <u>I</u> am that person!!!

I believe, however, that my post said "the perfect boat for us." I was refering to the boat's size, speed, etc and how it relates to the "mission." Not the dream mission or the unrealistic mission but the honest to God, genuine, Alabama mission. You know, the one we actually do but we don't tell others about!* Yeah, that one!

Now that I've become totally honest with myself, I do, indeed, have the "perfect boat." (For us, that is.) "The smaller the boat--the more time on the water."

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Old 01-13-2008, 11:18 PM   #27
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RE: Your boating history...

Walt,

You indeed were the one I was thinking about. I wondered if you'd respond.

Eric
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Old 01-14-2008, 10:23 AM   #28
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RE: Your boating history...

I stand properly chastened.* I still say that bigger is better -- but only to a point.* The 60 footer I was racing on was paid for by the owner and I was just along for the ride and to sing for my supper.* The 60 had a race crew of 19, a 20 foot beam, 13-6 draft and a masthead 105 feet off the water.* The 60, however, was MUCH more comfortable in a seaway than a 35 or 40, even if paying for it was not.

As far as ease of handling and comfort in terms of sea keeping along with affordability, 35 to 45 feet works for me.* I've single handedly raced a 34 and didn't have any problems.* It just takes experience and planing in terms of what to do next.* I certainly wouldn't use them as a good example, but there are some nuts out there that race 70 footers single handedly around the world.*

Frankly, I suspect that handling a power boat in close quarters is at least as demanding as any sailing I"VE ever done.* I'm looking forward to a new education.

DS*
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Old 01-14-2008, 05:01 PM   #29
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RE: Your boating history...

Eric:

I knew you were referring to me and that's why I responded in kind. One of these days I'm going to show up in Thorne bay for a face to face. I'll even buy!

I'm on the "hard" right now getting some bottom paint, transducer and Prop Speed. last bottom job was 10/2004 and it still looks passable.

Walt
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Old 01-14-2008, 08:28 PM   #30
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RE: Your boating history...

Walt,

I have no idea what you plan to buy but I'll go for the nose to nose part. Cheers

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Old 01-22-2008, 10:17 PM   #31
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RE: Your boating history...

My high school and college years were spent with OB skiffs and one plywood OB cruiser. The big 16' cedar planked skiff had oak frames and batten seams. I ran about 12 knts with a 15 hp Evinrude. Spent most of my time on rivers and Puget Sound standing amidships holding on to a heavy line tied to a frame. I learned a lot about how a boat should handle with this one. I rebuilt a 14' version of the same boat and it was'nt up to the standards of the 16. I had a plywood sail boat on Mission Bay in SanDiego ( while in the Navy ). Not really anyplace to go but out into the ocean but it was very pleasant sailing in the bay. Later in college I had a Bryant 17' OB cruiser with a 35hp Johnson. It was a very light mahogany plywood boat and I got good economy at about 12knts and the mixture leaned out. I remember crossing Georgia Strait at 7 knts amid 3' seas .. actually a pleasant memory, as I sang boldly to the seaguls ( I had just broken up w a girl ). Not long after that I took a 7 day trip on that boat and had a wonderful time. In my senior years in college I designed a ultra light OB boat. Several years later I was teaching HS shop in the Queen Charolette Islands and there built a 28' version of that boat. The cross section of the boat looked a little like a W with one more V in the middle. One could say it was a little like a cross between a cathedral and a trimaran hull. Fortunetely it was a good sea boat or I would have drowned at sea playing with it. It rode very softly despite it's ultralight displacement and went 14knts at half throttle w a 55hp Johnson 3cyl. Soon after that I took the boat to Juneau for one of the highlights of my life among whales, misty clouds, sea otters, seals and beautiful ice. My navigation equipment was a Silva hand held compas ( w quivering needle ) and a Forest Service map.....youth. Actually it was summer and charts were nowhere to be found.
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Old 01-23-2008, 05:10 AM   #32
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RE: Your boating history...

Well, first it was the inner tube. No, it was the plastic boats in the bathtub. I grew up in and around the water of the Gulf Coast in Port Arthur, TX. I was in boats of some kind literally as long as I can remember. We lashed barrels to pallets to make our own. Found one abandoned wooden pirouge (pee-row) and my friends mom got the station wagon and helped us haul it home. We put our allowances together and bought a couple of tubes of the cheapest caulk we could find, since that's all we could afford. Fixed it up, launched it, and it promptly sank.

Well, later we got into actual powerboats, sailboats, etc. I got a gig working as a deckhand on a towboat in the GICWW, running between somewhere in LA and Chocolate Bayou, TX. Two captains and two deckhands. Interesting! My first "big" boat was a 36' Sea Ray aft cabin, 1985 model purchased in 1993. Boy, did that change my life. At that time, I was doing management consulting, and had that three piece suit thing going on. The boat changed my life... heck, I don't even want to wear shoes any more! My dock neighbors poke fun at me any time I actually have a shirt on down there. Had the Sea Ray for 5 years or so, then bought a new Cruisers 3950 aft cabin. Had it for 5 years; bought the current Krogen in 2001. Lived aboard the Krogen for about 4 years, hoping to find someone who could cruise the great loop and Caribbean with me, but at my age, all the women are tied up, mostly with debt. I need to find someone either really rich or really poor to go cruising!

Went through lots of courses with the Power Squadron, learned celestial navigation which I haven't kept up with, did tons of work on my boat(s) and in doing so learned a lot about the stuff. I still do most of my own work, but occasionally hire folks to do something I don't want to mess with, or don't have the tools to do. Cruising area is mostly from Port Aransas, TX over to New Orleans, LA, although planning a cruise down to Key West, FL next November. WooHoo!

-- Edited by Keith at 06:17, 2008-01-23
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Old 01-30-2008, 10:51 PM   #33
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RE: Your boating history...

After 6 mos in Anchorage my 1st wife and I decided to move to Washington state. We sold or shipped all of our belongings not on the boat and headed south. We first went to Glacier Bay and then to Angoon where my father had a nice big house on a point of land sticking out into Kootznahoo Inlet where Creakie the eagle lived, float planes landed and whales fed beyond the kelp. It was such a magic place one could sit for hours and look out the window on a rainy day.
Walt ( Seahorse II ) has been there. After Petersburg and Ketchican we headed out to cross Dixon Entrance and got stuck in 10' head seas. Too far to go so we stopped at Foggy Bay. We surfed in on a rushing big sea, over a saddle and into the peaceful inner harbor. For three days the spray went over the bridge of ferries and ships. We ran out of water. I rowed up the river with the dink to find water. The tide changed and I could'nt row against it. Took me 5hrs to get back to the boat and Kathleen thought sure I was bear dinner. I always love to stop in Prince Rupert. I remember Oliver Inlet, Milbanke Sound and Bella Bella. We stopped at Butedale. At that time ( 73 ) Butedeale was still in good shape ( it isn't now ) and we were treated to showers ( hot and as long as we wished as the pelton wheel was still in operation). We took a month and a half to make the trip and thats what I plan to do this summer going north. In Vancouver BC we stood in awe at the tall buildings like we'd never seen um before. Shortly after we arrived in Washington I went to work at Uniflight in Bellingham. I worked on Whaleboats and Navy Utilities like FFs boat installing rudder ports, shaft logs and engine beds untill I got placed in the engineering department where I did drafting and equipment installation changes. It seems they could'nt build a boat that floated on an even keel so we had to move stuff around to ballance the boat. I was sort of involved in the development of the 28' Omega model ... Keith Walton NA.
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Old 01-30-2008, 11:58 PM   #34
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Your boating history...

Eric---

When you were a Uniflite did you know Paul Graf? He is the former Uniflite engineer I've mentioned who has helped us on a number of our boat projects recently. He has a sailboat that was new and stored just outside the Uniflite plant when the plant caught fire. The heat damaged much of one side of the boat. Paul bought it and spent quite awhile repairing it. He still sails it today.



-- Edited by Marin at 01:00, 2008-01-31
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Old 01-31-2008, 12:38 PM   #35
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RE: Your boating history...

Marin,

Paul Graf was the man insturmental in my getting fired. I wonder if he still caries many pens and pencils in a plastic sheath in his pocket? I sorta liked Paul put I hated the fact that he couldn't accept any other boats in the world. The world revolved around Uniflight. When I talked about other boats that were superior to the Uniflite product poor Paul Just could'nt handle it. I was a slow draftsman too and I'M sure that did'nt help. If I said a Rybovitch or a Hatterass was beter looking Paul just squirmed in frustration. But the Uniflite was a very well built boat. It's lines were much like those boats built by builders that also or primarly built fish boats and how can you call rubber window frames " classy ". Say hello to Paul and I hope he's doing very well.

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Old 01-31-2008, 01:03 PM   #36
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Eric--

Paul has been a member of the boating club we joined a few years ago for some 25 or 30 years and his boat is in the slip opposite ours, which is how we met. I haven't had occasion to discuss different boat makes with him, but he is a meticulous craftsman--- I believe he said he came from a farming family and learned the value of fixing things at an early age. He and his wife built their house on some 16 acres of wooded land outside Bellingham as well as much of the furniture, and the design and craftsmanship are remarkable.

When we had to replace our anchor windlass this fall, he was instrumental in helping me figure out how to get the old one off and how to adapt the new one to the existing mount. He has an amazing shop in the basement of his home and machined some parts I needed as well as "rescued" fasteners and other components I figured I'd need to replace. Whithout his help and guidance, I suspect the project would have been a huge exercise in frustration. As it was, it went very smoothly.

The value of forums like this one is the wide range of information you can get on any given question. For people who work on their boats (as opposed to hiring the work out) the information and advice you get here can be invaluable. In the same way, the willingness of someone to physically lend a hand on a tricky project can make all the difference in the world.

I have no idea how Paul might be to work for or with in a professional capacity so I can't comment on the experience you had with him. But I can tell you I haven't seen the pens and pencils in the pocket protector, so I guess it's not a necessity in retirement
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Old 02-03-2008, 10:01 PM   #37
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Your boating history...

So an addition to the history:

My first joy ride with friends on my current (and only owned) boat:

Backing out of the slip. Already everybody is complementing me on how smoothly and confidently I'm handling the boat (extremely technical departure: stbd engine aft, add the port engine aft a second later, and both neutral about three seconds later).

For some reason, I'm really paranoid about going back too far and hitting boats in the next row back. So the port engine comes back forward just before the bow clears the end of the slip.

I watch as the boat pivots beautifully. But boy, is the bow close to the piling at the end of the slip. I froze. In retrospect - port engine neutral, stbd aft, and five seconds later it wouldn't have been close. But after all of the smooth and confident stuff, I was absolutely paralyzed.

It probably cleared by six inches... but thank goodness, it did clear. Crew and passengers still convinced I'm master and commander. I'm doing a silent "thank you , God... I'll put on clean underwear later."

But the rest of the trip went great!!
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Old 02-04-2008, 11:34 AM   #38
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Your boating history...

Chris, don't be too hard on yourself. What if the bow had not cleared...."THUNK"....not really that big of a deal in the grand scheme of things. I realise being a relative newbie and your ego does get caught up in it.

I think the lesson here is what if you had not cleared the piling? How do you think the rest of the scenario would have played out? If you have a good answer to that question in your head, Great! If not, you may think a little harder and next time have all of your contingency plans in place before you start backing out. Knowing all of the forces at work(engine, bowthruster, wind, tide, etc.) and their effects on the boat is a big start.

You haven't screwed up until you start making excuses.
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Old 02-04-2008, 09:25 PM   #39
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John -

Two different answers in two different worlds:

Physical: not a big deal. Maybe a little mark on a few inches of caprail towards the bow, maybe even a little tweak to the railing. No real damage or danger.

Ego: whew... Wife on board for her first trip on the boat. I already manage to do enough things day to day to convince her that I'm not the brightest bulb in the chain. Friends whose feelings of confidence that they can trust me at the helm suddenly not so sure. And me - am I endangering my loved ones when I can't even get away from the dock without hitting something?

In this case, the miss was sure as good as the mile!!
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Old 02-04-2008, 10:06 PM   #40
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Well, glad ya made it!!!!....
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