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Old 09-02-2015, 01:02 PM   #141
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
Always use the head before you pull the anchor or cast off the dock lines.
Ted, your comment brought a smile to my ugly mug. I learned long ago that there's something about entering a navigation lock that makes me have to take a pee. Over the years I've learned to do that while enroute to the lock!

Another tip: Before we get up on plane I have GW go below to make sure everything is secure and nothing will fall and hit the floor.
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Old 09-02-2015, 01:03 PM   #142
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Wow! So far off topic, so much for this thread.
I got quite frustrated with it my first few threads but soon realized it is the norm here. Too bad in a way. I gave up on some bike forums because threads, regardless of topic, somehow became about guns and cigars.
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Old 09-02-2015, 01:55 PM   #143
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Thread creep is inevitable in a discussion among people who have many interests and a wide range of experiences.

The "solution," if one wants one, is a closely monitored forum with thread police to yank things back on track and admonish posters who stray from the topic.

John Baker and another fellow started TF precisely because of this. In 2007 the main internet cruising boat forum was Trawlers and Trawlering (T&T). It's a mailing list; it's sent out via email every day or you could choose to receive the individual email posts as they were sent in.

T&T is/was very strictly moderated. A lot of people thought it was over-the-top moderated.

Add to that the fact one couldn't post pictures as well as a lot of other limitations and there was good reason for someone to launch something using an entirely different format. Hence TF.

The price you pay for a more flexible and freewheeling discussion format is what you get here all the time: unpoliced thread creep.

Personally, I think it's great. Sure, it results in endless discussion about anchors and stuff but I learned a long time ago the art of skimming and selective reading. So it's easy to treat a ten page thread as though it's one page with six posts that are relevant to my interest. I don't find it inconvenient to scroll past twenty posts before finding one I want to read and I think most participants can tell at a glance if a post is something they want to read or not.

Even if it really bugged me that threads drifted around and grew to outlandish lengh due to off topic conversations I would not want to limit people's ability to write what they want. Sonetimes the off-topic discussions are more interesting and informative than the thread subject itself.

The alternative is something patterened after T&T and I would not want to have to go back to that.
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Old 09-02-2015, 02:25 PM   #144
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Sonetimes the off-topic discussions are more interesting and informative than the thread subject itself.
I agree, have learned from some off topic bla, bla, bla and have certainly come to um, understand (or try to) certainly personalities.


What I found with gung ho moderating is the imbalance of said moderation, to the point that moderators and the "ins" break their own rigid rules.

The OP can always yank it back onto the tracks anyway.
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Old 09-02-2015, 02:32 PM   #145
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Menzies,

I am a bit confused. When I initially posted;

"Look behind you to see what your wake is doing to boats, docks, bulkheads, etc behind you. Not only is this courteous, but you are liable for any damage caused by your wake."

Your response was;

"That is actually a myth, driven by rag-boaters, people who anchor tiny boats in a major waterway to fish, and those living on the water."

You then go on to support your contention with what would appear to be expert opinion in part it was:

"A vessel causing injury to others by her swell or wake is held responsible for any failure to appreciate the reasonable effect of her own speed and motion through the water at the particular place and under the particular circumstances where the injury occurred. Her officers are required to take all reasonable precautions to avoid injury to another vessel, including crew or passengers. All reasonable precautions must be taken even though past experience has shown that in the ordinary and usual course of events they are likely to escape injury."

You seem rather exorcised over this whole issue. Not being familiar with the ICW I can only assume you have very good reason to be. However, I never said, nor implied, that folks around the water don't have a responsibility to maintain their own equipment, docks, shorelines etc.... to avoid damage. All I did say was that we are liable for damage our wakes cause, which the article you copied seems to clearly support. It was hardly a "myth" as you put it.

Now, if you had simply also pointed out that in addition to being careful with our wakes, that all folks around the water have a similar responsibility to be careful with how and where they anchor, how they maintain their piers and docks, how they tie to a dock, and how they maintain their shoreline, this little rabbit trail would never have occurred and I would have have simply replied with "thanks for that important reminder".

So... thanks for that important reminder.

Dave
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Old 09-02-2015, 02:35 PM   #146
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Menzies,

I am a bit confused. When I initially posted;

"Look behind you to see what your wake is doing to boats, docks, bulkheads, etc behind you. Not only is this courteous, but you are liable for any damage caused by your wake."

Your response was;

"That is actually a myth, driven by rag-boaters, people who anchor tiny boats in a major waterway to fish, and those living on the water."

You then go on to support your contention with what would appear to be expert opinion in part it was:

"A vessel causing injury to others by her swell or wake is held responsible for any failure to appreciate the reasonable effect of her own speed and motion through the water at the particular place and under the particular circumstances where the injury occurred. Her officers are required to take all reasonable precautions to avoid injury to another vessel, including crew or passengers. All reasonable precautions must be taken even though past experience has shown that in the ordinary and usual course of events they are likely to escape injury."

You seem rather exorcised over this whole issue. Not being familiar with the ICW I can only assume you have very good reason to be. However, I never said, nor implied, that folks around the water don't have a responsibility to maintain their own equipment, docks, shorelines etc.... to avoid damage. All I did say was that we are liable for damage our wakes cause, which the article you copied seems to clearly support. It was hardly a "myth" as you put it.

Now, if you had simply also pointed out that in addition to being careful with our wakes, that all folks around the water have a similar responsibility to be careful with how and where they anchor, how they maintain their piers and docks, how they tie to a dock, and how they maintain their shoreline, this little rabbit trail would never have occurred and I would have have simply replied with "thanks for that important reminder".

So... thanks for that important reminder.

Dave
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Old 09-02-2015, 02:53 PM   #147
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One thing I do when I have a good number people on board - that's likely to attract the attention of a passing CG boat. Grab a PFD for everyone and strap them onto the bimini/canvas supports.

It has a dual purpose - they are right to hand if ever needed AND the CG see a vessel which, although there seems to be a good group of people aboard, also seems to be buttoned down!

Don't know if it works because in my 13 years in Florida waters I have only been inspected once !
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Old 09-02-2015, 03:22 PM   #148
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Getting back to good ideas....

One I'm quite pleased with is a trick/tool to compress larger impellers for reinsertion into a pump. Small impellers are no big deal to man-handle into place, btu if you have a large one that is 2-1/2" or 3" in diameter and 4" long, it can be quite a struggle to get all the fins smushed down enough to get the darn thing back in the pump.

I discovered that a piston ring compressor tool is the perfect solution. If you have never seen or used on, it's just a wide metal band that forms a cuff sort of like a blood pressure cuff and had a ratchet mechanism to expand or shrink it's diameter. Simply place the impeller inside and ratchet it down until everything is compressed enough, hold it up against the pump with the impeller hub and pump spline lined up, and tap the impeller in with the but end of a hammer handle or large screw driver. It works great.

The only caution I would offer is that I've seen two styles of ring compressor tools. There is the wide cuff with bands that are about 4" wide that is designed to encompass most or all of the piston. Then there is a much narrower band that looks more like an oil filter wrench. You want the wide band style, not the one that looks like an oil filter.
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Old 09-02-2015, 03:45 PM   #149
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Twistedtree, great tip. Are you refering to one like this?
Piston Ring Compressor at AutoZone.com - Best Piston Ring Compressor Parts for Cars, Trucks & SUVS
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Old 09-02-2015, 05:47 PM   #150
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1. Write down everything you do to maintain your boat and modify/improve/update your boat. Not every boat wash, water fill or pumpout, but every oil change, battery service, filter change, bottom clean. zinc change, etc. Document when the next check/change is due on that item.

2. In my covered slip, I suspend my spring and stern docklines on the outer post. As I enter the slip, I place the fwd spring on the amidship cleat and the aft spring and stern lines on the aft cleat. Those 3 lines secure the boat from drifting fore, aft or sideways until I can shut down engines and secure the last 2 lines. Makes for simple single-handing.

3. Two VHF comms at the main helm are essential for me to monitor local traffic and communicate with fellow boaters. Having a Remote Command mic and speaker from the FB VHF to the lower helm works great for me.

4. Laminated briefing cards for new passengers keeps them busy reading while leaving the dock. One side has vessel facts and history. The other side has safety items like PFD and fire extinguisher locations, head instructions and precautions to keep a hand hold while underway. By the time they're done reading, we're safely away from the dock.

5. No talking to the crew unless it's very important or we overlooked something when approaching or leaving the dock.

6. When a condition is noted that will require attention later, write it down on a squawk sheet so I don't forget it later.
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Old 09-02-2015, 06:24 PM   #151
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4. Laminated briefing cards for new passengers keeps them busy reading while leaving the dock. One side has vessel facts and history. The other side has safety items like PFD and fire extinguisher locations, head instructions and precautions to keep a hand hold while underway. By the time they're done reading, we're safely away from the dock.

.
Your entire list was good but this is one we do like you. We're really very informal people but when it comes to safety we get formal. We actually give those boating with us the first time a tour of the boat and a laminated sheet, front and back. I think the one that is the hardest for them is not to move around while we're docking and not to help in any way unless asked to. However, people moving suddenly can block your view, move just into your line of sight and helping can get them injured. I don't think sometimes they appreciate the weight of a boat. Because it's on water, they seem to think it's light, I can just stick my hand out and push it away from that dock or grab something and pull it in or I'll jump onto the dock to help. I understand the urge to help. We get on our best friend's 52' Riva. We trained her and our boat was the first small boat she was ever on (yes she's been on cruise ships and 300' yachts). Ours was the first she ever took the helm. But when we're on her boat, we don't start to help until instructed. If she says, "would you get that line please," we do it. Otherwise we watch. It's tough sometimes to follow your own rules on someone else's boat, but she knows we're there and we're willing. However, she and her best friend or her mother handle it by themselves all the time.

We make it clear that safety overrules anything else on the boat. If the "Captain" says to put life jackets on, you put them on.

And many have never used a marine head. I hadn't until we moved here and bought a boat. Didn't have them on the lake.

I should have had a card on the lake, but didn't know about doing such. Worst situation I ever had was a friend of a friend of a friend ended up with me one day. There were four of us in total. The boat had a sunpad at the stern and I didn't allow anyone to be on it when we were underway. I told her once, then turned and before I could do anything she was back up there. I told her if she did it again, I was going to put her out and she could walk back and I was going to put her out wherever we were at the moment, even if in the middle of the lake. She pouted but stayed off the sunpad. I knew nothing about being a captain or anything at that time but I knew it was my boat and I was responsible for the well being of the passengers.
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Old 09-02-2015, 08:52 PM   #152
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Twistedtree, great tip. Are you refering to one like this?
Piston Ring Compressor at AutoZone.com - Best Piston Ring Compressor Parts for Cars, Trucks & SUVS
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That's it. If you have big impellers, it will be the best $10 you have spent in a long time....
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Old 09-02-2015, 08:54 PM   #153
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I will certainly add that tool to my arsenal ASAP. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 09-02-2015, 09:14 PM   #154
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My "great idea"

I posted this a couple of years ago but couldn't find the thread. In the old MT's there are sliding doors on the under-bunk and under salon couch storage areas but getting stuff in and out of there is a pain. I took out the doors, butt-glued them and made them "drawer fronts" for the spaces. Now the space is accessible and larger stuff can be stored there.
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Old 09-02-2015, 09:19 PM   #155
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4. Laminated briefing cards for new passengers keeps them busy reading while leaving the dock. One side has vessel facts and history. The other side has safety items like PFD and fire extinguisher locations, head instructions and precautions to keep a hand hold while underway. By the time they're done reading, we're safely away from the dock.
I always find that guests are a bit bewildered at leaving so tend to stand back, but are more comfortable when arriving back and tend to want to help as thanks. That's when I invite them up to the fly bridge to see how it all works! Leaving the missus to get on with it.

Which reminds me: my missus has gotten very comfortable screaming at someone hurrying down the dock to "help us" - "I've got it, thanks," in such a tone that they know she means it.
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Old 09-02-2015, 09:26 PM   #156
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I posted this a couple of years ago but couldn't find the thread. In the old MT's there are sliding doors on the under-bunk and under salon couch storage areas but getting stuff in and out of there is a pain. I took out the doors, butt-glued them and made them "drawer fronts" for the spaces. Now the space is accessible and larger stuff can be stored there.

ARoss- that is an excellent idea!!


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Old 09-02-2015, 10:01 PM   #157
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I use a nylon cable tie to compress an impeller's vanes. I put it around the impeller zip it a bit tight, orient all the vanes in the right direction then tighten enough to slip the impeller into the housing, once in up to the tie (half way) I clip the tie with a diagonal cutting plier and slide the rest of the impeller in. Use a tie about 1/4"-3/8" wide.
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Old 09-03-2015, 01:38 AM   #158
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I use a nylon cable tie to compress an impeller's vanes. I put it around the impeller zip it a bit tight, orient all the vanes in the right direction then tighten enough to slip the impeller into the housing, once in up to the tie (half way) I clip the tie with a diagonal cutting plier and slide the rest of the impeller in. Use a tie about 1/4"-3/8" wide.
I like that idea. I also smear almost any rubber type components that require some lubrication like oil filter seals and impellers with a product from Dow Corning called Compound 4. Its a silicon dielectric grease which is commonly used in aviation on seals and things, has multiple uses in the marine environment and will ensure smooth operation of impellers and other components.
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:43 AM   #159
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Have also used the zip tie method on big impellers with success; for ease-of-installation lube, liquid soap works well.

As for the oil filter changes, and the huge filters on the Detroits, after coming out of the first few oil changes looking like Pigpen from Peanuts, I was turned on to using the big heavy ply contractor's trash bags which could be nicely molded to the well beneath the filter. Trying to get various pails and pans under there that could handle the volume of oil in the filter was fruitless. So 1) position bag 2)drill big holes in bottom of filter 3) go do something else for awhile 4) spin filter off. 5) repeat at next engine. When I got to an oil recycling depot, stuffed the bunched up top of the bag into the hole, got most of the oil out, deposited bag with filter in filter bin. When we were cruising full time, I was doing three or four changes a year, so trying to do this cleanly and easily became a bit of an obsession, given my innate ability to turn any kind of job into a messy one.
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Old 09-03-2015, 06:53 AM   #160
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George, good tip. I can definately relate to the fruitless effort with the pails. Especially when I tried to remove it without drilling the hole first. Loaded with oil that puppy is heavy when you are in a somewhat awkward postion. I would get it into the bucket with oil going everywhere and then I could not get the bucket out..... Thanks for the tip which I will use on my next change.
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