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Old 08-31-2015, 08:37 AM   #61
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I think the advice to never use rudder with twins is from teaching newbies to twins.

Once comfortable...graduating to using rudder and more advanced techniques usually comes into play.
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:38 AM   #62
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Quote:
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"backing in with strong current or wind, how you remember which way to turn the wheel?"

Imagine your self standing behind the wheel as you go aft and steer normally.
Perfect! Just what I was looking for.

I think I agree with the "neutral rudders" method as a first (major) step in close quarters maneuvering. I plan to use the wheel only in extreme circumstances but need to take that next step.

Thanks!
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:53 AM   #63
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I guess you never walk your boat sideways. A smart boater uses all available tools at the correct time.
Never had the need to - 13 years with the current boat. Either reversing into a slip or going alongside a bulkhead. With proper use of twins and current (rarely wind), I never have to touch the wheel when docking.

Now, those with a single, different story.
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Old 08-31-2015, 09:03 AM   #64
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When using twins centralize the rudders and never touch the wheel when docking - use the gears and a little goose if needs be.

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I guess you never walk your boat sideways. A smart boater uses all available tools at the correct time.
Unless emergency actions are required - like needing to immediately avert a seagoing collision... or to avert being thrashed against a jetty... or needing to retrieve a MOB...

When in tight quarters (docking, rafting, beaching, traveling in shallow waters... etc): No matter how/what you are utilizing for items aboard boat for producing the boat's movement/direction... Go at it all Very Slowly! Take your time; there is seldom ever a true need to rush at all when boat is close to things. By Slow - I mean - speeds that could be measured in yards/feet per hour, rather than miles per hour. When in-close to things... by using controls, a boat should be able to be brought to an absolute stand-still or moved into an opposite direction path within a foot or two movement - or even less! Some times inches count for preventing human injury or material damage!
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Old 08-31-2015, 09:07 AM   #65
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A good canvas shop can replace all that soft vinyl with semi rigid polycarbonate (lexan type) windows. The poly carbonate is much superior to soft vinyl.. Try it in the center front window first if you are unsure. My canvas guy even curved the corners using 30 mil instead of 50 mil. The curve gave rigidity.
I'm looking at replacing my veranda eisenglass now. Does the Lexan still roll up?
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Old 08-31-2015, 09:10 AM   #66
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Crew Rules:

Never put yourself between the boat and another object.
Always one hand for yourself.
Open the cap for the holding tank VERY slowly.
Make sure that there is air coming out of the fuel vent when starting to fill.
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Old 08-31-2015, 09:15 AM   #67
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No lexan does not roll up. You attach snaps or toggles overhead and swing the window up. Easier and faster than rolling but the primary benefit is clarity. Five years later they still look new.

Lexan was the most significant improvement I made on my boat. If you look at the pix most of the windows will swing up. The upper helm became fully enclosed for bad weather and could be fully open or partially open as conditions changed. The small "smily" vents were great to allow air flow even in wet conditions. I added a visor to the top as well.
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Old 08-31-2015, 09:22 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
Never had the need to - 13 years with the current boat. Either reversing into a slip or going alongside a bulkhead. With proper use of twins and current (rarely wind), I never have to touch the wheel when docking.

Now, those with a single, different story.
Twins are sweet, aren't they though! Sort-a like a full track tractor. Turn nearly on a dime via throttle rpm and shift positions; with no need for rudder to be in other than straight configuration.

However, in order to walk a boat directly sideways from a standstill... some play between rudder angles and engines' throttles/shifts positions can be very useful.
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Old 08-31-2015, 10:30 AM   #69
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When I was learning to drive my single screw Mainship the best advice I got was that the stern moves first. Once I got this concept docking became much easier.


And when moving around outside ONE HAND ON THE BOAT at all times.
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Old 08-31-2015, 10:43 AM   #70
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When I was learning to drive my single screw Mainship the best advice I got was that the stern moves first. Once I got this concept docking became much easier.
My Aha! moment came when I visualized our boat turning like a slow moving vehicle on a frozen lake...kind of sideways with the arse end wanting to swing out.
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Old 08-31-2015, 11:52 AM   #71
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A very easy way to pilot the boat in and out of the dock/jetty if you have a bow thruster. Fit one of the 1700 series combined gear/throttle thruster levers from Morse, you can't believe how much it simplifies the whole docking process.


You can get them from Parks Masterson at Hopcar, very courteous and helpful.
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Old 08-31-2015, 12:49 PM   #72
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Back to inaccurate fuel gauge ideas... This is a simple way to check with no ambiguity.
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Old 08-31-2015, 01:31 PM   #73
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IF MAMA AIN'T HAPPY....AIN'T NOBODY HAPPY!!!!

Come on guys. This is THE #1 rule of boating and eveything else follows this rule. I can't believe this answer is on page 4!!!!....

Also, I agree with WifeyB!!!! USE THE BOAT!!! There is alot of wisdom there. THere is no way to know the condition of your systems unless you use the boat!!!
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Old 08-31-2015, 02:28 PM   #74
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Keeping your clear vinyl enclousure panels clear

I keep cotton gloves handy for use when rolling up my clear vinyl enclosure Panels/windows. Keeps finger print oils, and fingernail scratches off of expensive material. Harbor freight sells cotton gloves cheap.
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Old 08-31-2015, 02:30 PM   #75
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Your Best Technique or Invention

Next time you're at a dock, whether you have an all chain rode or a combination of chain and line: Take time to flake out and accurately measure and put marks on the rode at intervals ( whatever measurement you want whether fathoms, 10's of feet). This way when you (or someone ((your little helper)) is letting out anchor rode they have a way of telling how much is out.
I have 65' of chain. I marked every 10' with paint. My new rode I am going to mark with small pieces of line between the strands so I can see AND feel how many are there. One strand for 25' Two for 50'. 3 for 75'. 4 for 100'. 5 for 150'. 6 for 175'. And a eye splice at the end. There is already a 150' rode but it is old, tight and chafed in a couple places. So it's becoming my 'lunch hook rode' now.

It's easier to successfully anchor when you KNOW how much line you have out. 7:1 is the magic number.

P.S. Using the rudder may be confusing to a beginner when maneuvering. But practicing USING rudder (correctly) makes all the difference in pulling out tight quarters maneuvers successfully. Speed kills. The closer you get TO the dock the less throttle you should use.
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Old 08-31-2015, 02:44 PM   #76
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I think this may be one of the most helpful threads ever here. Even those things we know, it serves as a great reminder.
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Old 08-31-2015, 02:53 PM   #77
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I think this may be one of the most helpful threads ever here. Even those things we know, it serves as a great reminder.
True...I need to measure out my anchoring rode..
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Old 08-31-2015, 02:56 PM   #78
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My new rode I am going to mark with small pieces of line between the strands so I can see AND feel how many are there. One strand for 25' Two for 50'. 3 for 75'. 4 for 100'. 5 for 150'. 6 for 175'. And a eye splice at the end. There is already a 150' rode but it is old, tight and chafed in a couple places. So it's becoming my 'lunch hook rode' now.
I have a rope/chain rode. My last rode I laid out the rope on the grass at home and spray painted the line from the anchor end starting with red at 10 feet (to know you were coming to the chain), then different colors at 25, 50, 75, 100 etc. The color code was glued to the helm. My instructions to the anchor crew would be something like "until blue in the water." Worked very well.
My most recent rode I bought the rode markers at West Marine. They are little pieces of pre-marked sturdy rubber that you thread between the strands. Also works well and have lasted two years without issue so far. Not sure how they would fair on a chain windlass though.
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Old 08-31-2015, 04:49 PM   #79
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A set of radio headphone to allow talking to the deck crew easily. Not voice activated however as the wind will overpower it.
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Old 08-31-2015, 05:01 PM   #80
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If the head was used, pump out every time you return to the dock, even if just a day cruise. Your dock and raft up neighbors will appreciate it every time you flush.

Fenders - bigger is better!

Don't delay maintenance.

And agree 100% with these previous suggestions - dock no faster than you want to hit anything, and USE THE BOAT, and HAVE FUN.
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