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Old 08-30-2015, 03:29 PM   #21
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Never approach the dock any faster than you want to hit it.

When using twins centralize the rudders and never touch the wheel when docking - use the gears and a little goose if needs be.

Put a little plastic trash can in the head(s) and tell all visitors that all TP goes in there rather than the toilet (both #1 and #2s).

Set the morning coffee maker up before you start drinking for the evening.

Whomever takes the dog ashore for the last pee of the night gets to stay in their bunk during the first pee of the day.

Weaver davits on the swim platform WILL Stub your toe severely at least once every weekend.

Just because they get paid to work the docks at a marina, doesn't mean that they necessarily know what the hell they are doing. Make sure to tell them CLEARLY what you want done.

Tip yer durn dockhand!
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Old 08-30-2015, 03:30 PM   #22
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Great thread! Here's one of mine. We had some Sunbrella left over from some cushions we had made a few of years ago. I had the shop stitch up the remaining piece that I added snaps to. Now- as the morning sun intrudes onto the port side of the sundeck- I snap my "blind" onto the hardtop for relief. I switch sides later for the evening sun. Actually I have snaps in place on the aft part of the hard top as well. This is left over from our last slip which would get lots of evening sun into the salon.
Notice the snaps on the bottom. I would snap these together to be able to lay bottles of water for weight- though this never worked that well. I think the trick for this design is to NOT try to contain all four edges. Across the top and maybe one corner has made for a long lasting approach to some shade (which I love) .
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1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
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Old 08-30-2015, 03:40 PM   #23
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If you have an older trawler that has been through several previous owners, the electronics probably have been upgraded a few times. LORANS, depthfinders, old auto pilots and radios come to mind. Installers simply pull the old wiring tight and clip off the cables at the harness. Take a couple hours some day and pull out the old unused wires. When you eventually need to troubleshoot something, it is much easier to trace cables when the old stuff is out of the way.
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Old 08-30-2015, 04:37 PM   #24
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1- The flag across the way from our slip is always a dependable indication of what the wind is actually doing in our marina and let's me know what to expect while docking.
2- Yelling while docking, mooring or anchoring never helps. We have a quick chat about the situation before maneuvering then use hand signals to accomplish the task. If something goes wrong we talk about it when finished.
3- Most importantly; we boat for pleasure so if it's not fun we're doing it wrong!
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Old 08-30-2015, 04:45 PM   #25
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The Admiral says:

1- Check the Current Atlas every time.

2- Update your wind and weather outlook often.
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Old 08-30-2015, 05:06 PM   #26
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Three things...

First, be exceedingly kind to the people at every marina, restaurant or area you visit, and start before you arrive. Same with bridge tenders and lock masters. Make them all feel that you truly appreciate your help. We do so that's not a fake belief. This is your recreation so it should come with smiles and be upbeat. In return you'll find 98% of the time you'll get treated wonderfully. Part of it is follow up as well. Yes, you may have reservations but speak to them the day or two before and then let them know you're close. Even if for some reason they weren't prepared, you're giving them a chance to correct it before you arrive so they look good and you're taken care of. We treat dockhands with respect. Also, if you can turn it personal and not all business. Years ago I dealt regularly with manufacturing in Puerto Rico, on the west side. There was one person there who stuck rigidly to the tradition which was to never start a phone call with business. Even if he talked to you two hours ago he'd ask how you were or how your lunch was or something. It's amazing how it made the calls go. We laughed about it but it was a great tradition. I try to do it today. My wife naturally does it. We deal with the same bridge tenders regularly when home. They have good memories. Fortunately, we're on their good side.

Second, put things away. A place for everything and everything in it's place. You don't have a luxury of space. Regardless of boat size it's still likely smaller than your house or last house. The boat won't ever feel crowded if things are properly stowed.

Third, when going to foreign countries and ports for the first time, use an agent. Everything will go smoothly. Smoother than you could have done it yourself? Not always. But never less smooth. I can say without question we got cleared with less problems and quicker than other boats arriving and not using an agent. Call the agent a little before your arrival and they'll be there to help.

Remember, this is fun. This is pleasure. Even when it seems not, remind yourself it is. Fixing something that is broken is still part of the pleasure as it brings you closer to the pleasure.

Oh...my wife has one more.

Wifey B: USE THE BOAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-30-2015, 05:08 PM   #27
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Boat mantra: Use it or lose it!
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Old 08-30-2015, 05:26 PM   #28
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I don't know about using an agent. We use them routinely in our business for foreign clearances. That is one of the few businesses that gets paid in excess of what they think it might cost UPFRONT. In other words, wire us $100,000 and if there is any left we'll send it to you.....after a while...maybe.
My first wife was a customs broker who dealt with shipping agents on a daily basis. Some of the stories would defy your imagination.
I hear the Mafia is looking to get into that business.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:02 PM   #29
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Put a little plastic trash can in the head(s) and tell all visitors that all TP goes in there rather than the toilet (both #1 and #2s).
Yuk! Menzies, were you a former sailboater? All my sailboat friends do this with their manual heads, but none of the powerboaters I know do this.

My electric head chews everything up with its macerator, so this is not necessary.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:08 PM   #30
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Yuk! Menzies, were you a former sailboater? All my sailboat friends do this with their manual heads, but none of the powerboaters I know do this.

My electric head chews everything up with its macerator, so this is not necessary.
Not yuck at all. In fact I believe it encourages guests to go before they come and/or wait until afterwards! Saves my holding tank from filling up!
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:09 PM   #31
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Not a technique or invention; just a suggestion.

We decided not to buy anything for Badger (our first boat) in the first year of ownership, except for a new/larger anchor and rode. This kept us from buying lots of gear we thought we needed, and allowed us time to learn the idiosyncrasies of the older, but entirely adequate, equipment already aboard.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:12 PM   #32
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Yuk! Menzies, were you a former sailboater? All my sailboat friends do this with their manual heads, but none of the powerboaters I know do this.

My electric head chews everything up with its macerator, so this is not necessary.
Or just buy the right TP and avoid problems. We do (on our sailboat with manual heads) remind the guests to use the TP sparingly and to flush frequently and long.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:34 PM   #33
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Tell your guests that the first person to use the head cleans it at the end of the day.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:35 PM   #34
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God Please don't turn this in to a toilet paper thread. I'm enjoying all of the great ideas!!


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:50 PM   #35
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I hold a "pre flight briefing" before we take guests out. The info includes where life jackets are, safety rules including nobody going up to the bow without my permission and unless the boat is stopped, and use of a marine head. That includes the use of TP ("3 sheets") and the caution that if they use to much they WILL plug the head and I WILL know who did it because they'll have to come tell me.

I also caution them that when we return to the dock nobody is expected to do anything unless I specifically ask them to do it.
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Old 08-30-2015, 06:56 PM   #36
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God Please don't turn this in to a toilet paper thread. I'm enjoying all of the great ideas!!


1983 Present 42 Sundeck
Twin Lehman 135's
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Please Please Please - I agree!!! This thread is about great boating use ideas... not TP.

There's already been a shitty TP thread about a year ago. It never got fully to the bottom of things (pun intended). If you need to squawk about toilet tissue and where to stuff it... please go to the search feature to find that crappy ol thread and post there.

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Old 08-30-2015, 07:23 PM   #37
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Not a technique or invention; just a suggestion.

We decided not to buy anything for Badger (our first boat) in the first year of ownership, except for a new/larger anchor and rode. This kept us from buying lots of gear we thought we needed, and allowed us time to learn the idiosyncrasies of the older, but entirely adequate, equipment already aboard.

I think that's great plan and one we plan to use as we try to close a deal on a N46. There are many bells and whistles that I think we can be without. Just need to spend some time on the boat to find out what's really important to us. We'll see, survey and mechanics reports come in next week!
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Old 08-30-2015, 07:43 PM   #38
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Please Please Please - I agree!!! This thread is about great boating use ideas... not TP.

There's already been a shitty TP thread about a year ago. It never got fully to the bottom of things (pun intended). If you need to squawk about toilet tissue and where to stuff it... please go to the search feature to find that crappy ol thread and post there.

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Censorship!!!!!!

Or is that Censortp!!!!
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Old 08-30-2015, 08:17 PM   #39
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Not a technique or invention; just a suggestion.

We decided not to buy anything for Badger (our first boat) in the first year of ownership, except for a new/larger anchor and rode. This kept us from buying lots of gear we thought we needed, and allowed us time to learn the idiosyncrasies of the older, but entirely adequate, equipment already aboard.


This is great advice. Wish I had known this before I bought all my unneeded stuff.
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Old 08-30-2015, 08:20 PM   #40
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I bought a drift parachute - never needed it.

EPIRB, never needed it.

Personal beacons, never needed it.

Liferaft, never needed it.

Full set of spare items for one engine (belts, filters, impellers, etc.) never needed to dip into it yet.

So, it does depend on where you are going. If staying inland and local that strategy may be fine. But there is a ton of stuff on any "small ship" that will hopefully never be needed. But you should have it.
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