Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-13-2015, 04:13 PM   #1
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,148
Talking Are You Mocked at the Dock?

Funny Story

Are you ‘mocked at the dock?’ Here are some tips ...
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
1988 M/Y Camargue Yacht Fisher
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 04:23 PM   #2
Guru
 
Sailor of Fortune's Avatar
 
City: Saint Augustine, Fl.
Country: Port of St Augustine ,FL
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,959
hell, I don't need to go to a dock to get mocked...
__________________

Sailor of Fortune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 04:55 PM   #3
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor of Fortune View Post
hell, I don't need to go to a dock to get mocked...
Is mocked like half moored, half docked?
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 05:20 PM   #4
Guru
 
City: Hotel, CA
Country: Fried
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 8,328
__________________
Craig

It's easier to fool people than to convince them that they've been fooled - Mark Twain
CPseudonym is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 05:24 PM   #5
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,568
Tied up, you`d be docked at a mock.
(Cannot resist a spoonerism opportunity).
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 05:27 PM   #6
Curmudgeon
 
BaltimoreLurker's Avatar
 
City: Stoney Creek, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moon Dance
Vessel Model: 1974 34' Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,629
Not mocked, but sometimes I get sympathy! Most of my dockmates have twins and they seem to slip in and out like magic.

I sometimes hear:

"What's he doing?"
"He's got a single."
"Oh."
BaltimoreLurker is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 08:08 PM   #7
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,096
You see it all too often. The docking skill level is inversely proportional to the sound level of orders given to crew on an incoming boat.

Its been a steep learning curve with a single screw. I'm sure I've been mocked on numerous occasions coming in on a breezy day. My first entrance was a complete disaster. Luckily the docks were deserted with a 30 knot wind blowing.

I think now I have earned some respect, simply because I use my boat more than 98% of the boats in the marina, often when conditions are less than perfect and nobody else is going anywhere.
There are days I struggle, and I've learned to occasionally just tie off at the easy access end of the slip to wait for the wind to subside.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 08:20 PM   #8
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,322
Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
You see it all too often. The docking skill level is inversely proportional to the sound level of orders given to crew on an incoming boat.

Its been a steep learning curve with a single screw. I'm sure I've been mocked on numerous occasions coming in on a breezy day. My first entrance was a complete disaster. Luckily the docks were deserted with a 30 knot wind blowing.

I think now I have earned some respect, simply because I use my boat more than 98% of the boats in the marina, often when conditions are less than perfect and nobody else is going anywhere.
There are days I struggle, and I've learned to occasionally just tie off at the easy access end of the slip to wait for the wind to subside.
Brilliant...especially that last bit.

I jumped from a 21' sea kayak to our 30 footer. My attitude was that everybody starts at the bottom of the learning curve, and there's nothing wrong with aborting, then setting up for a second try...as long as nobody elses boat gets hurt. At least my mouth doesn't go dry entering the marina any more
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 09:00 PM   #9
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,447
And there is no indignity about backing out of a slip, you can only steer the rear with a single anyway.

I like the challenges of maneuvering a single. Took me a while to figure out how to back my 32 straight, but you sure understand how it all works when you do.
__________________
Don't believe everything that you think.
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 09:57 PM   #10
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
We jumped from a 28 ft twin screw to a 58 ft single screw Thank God it has a bowthruster. Big difference as it became a marina thing. Most of us have started been there. Its common with bigger boats to ASK for assistance and help. There is no biggy about bumping rubbing against the dock as long as there's is no damage and no body hurt except my my pride.

Heck look at the commercial and professional hulls with marks, scraps and denys. Just go toll with it.
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 10:07 PM   #11
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Quote:
Originally Posted by BaltimoreLurker View Post
Not mocked, but sometimes I get sympathy! Most of my dockmates have twins and they seem to slip in and out like magic.

I sometimes hear:

"What's he doing?"
"He's got a single."
"Oh."
Darrell, the only time I made a real booboo docking, was when I swung in beautifully, looked for the lines we normally pick up easily, only to find I have swung beautifully into the wrong, (empty) berth. Ours was one finger along. I blamed the 2iC for distracting me, by warning I was getting a bit close to the boats on the other side of the fairway just before the 'swing'. She was concerned we might touch a dinghy when the stern swungno way..!
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 10:30 PM   #12
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
The limit to my docking "booboos" was several of these rubber trails (knock on wood):





(Hand me the acetone and a rag.)
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2015, 11:36 PM   #13
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Fill View Post
We jumped from a 28 ft twin screw to a 58 ft single screw Thank God it has a bowthruster. Big difference as it became a marina thing. Most of us have started been there. Its common with bigger boats to ASK for assistance and help. There is no biggy about bumping rubbing against the dock as long as there's is no damage and no body hurt except my my pride. ...
Docking is usually the most nervous episode of boating outings. ... I've found that offered help is usually more distracting than helpful. ... When I offer help, I'm there to fend off and won't take a line unless requested/offered. ... I like my bow thruster, having only a single main propulsion propeller.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 12:14 AM   #14
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,568
It`s a controlled collision, sometimes more controlled than others, with a nice feeling when it goes well.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 02:13 AM   #15
Guru
 
Wayfarer's Avatar
 
City: Oneida Lake, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Radio Flyer
Vessel Model: Wilderness Systems Aspire 105
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 784
The first dozen or so dockings in my current vessel made me look like a real knob. I was plagued with shift cable issues, and when I really counted on being able to twin screw her, as often as not, one of the engines would either refuse to engage in the direction of my choosing, or just shut down, sometimes taking my power steering with it. Great fun!

One of my first investments was some nice squishy fendering for my pilings. They've really pulled their weight.
__________________
Dave
Just be nice to each other, dammit.
Wayfarer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 06:22 AM   #16
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: New York, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,313
Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
You see it all too often. The docking skill level is inversely proportional to the sound level of orders given to crew on an incoming boat.

Its been a steep learning curve with a single screw. I'm sure I've been mocked on numerous occasions coming in on a breezy day. My first entrance was a complete disaster. Luckily the docks were deserted with a 30 knot wind blowing.

I think now I have earned some respect, simply because I use my boat more than 98% of the boats in the marina, often when conditions are less than perfect and nobody else is going anywhere.
There are days I struggle, and I've learned to occasionally just tie off at the easy access end of the slip to wait for the wind to subside.


Pretty much mirrors my experience.

I also am better about taking any slip I can get into, instead of letting them get me in trouble trying to get someplace impossible.
__________________
M/Y Dauntless, New York
a Kadey Krogen 42 Currently https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Blog: https://dauntlessatsea.com
Find us: https://share.delorme.com/dauntless
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 07:52 AM   #17
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
I'm not a big fan of "read these seven steps and you'll be an expert at doing x" articles because reading an article in one's armchair is a bit different than standing or sitting at the helm of one's boat with an adverse wind and not much space at the dock and so on.

We learned to operate a single engine cruising boat first simply because that's what we chartered. It had a bow thruster which came in handy on several occasions, but for the most part we found maneuvering the boat to be pretty straightforward. Granted, we had a lot of apples-and-oranges single engine experience with canal boats in the UK, so things like propwalk and hull pivot and so on were familiar forces to us.

When we decided to buy a cruising boat of our own, our list of requirements did not include the number of engines (it does now). As it happened, the boat that best met our needs and budget is a twin.

Neither of us had ever run a twin engine boat before, and we were both very apprehensive. To the point of asking a good friend-- the founder of Kenmore Air and who was an avid and expert boater in his steel-hulled deFever--- to take us out on Lake Washington and give us some twin-engine lessons. He agreed but pointed out that in his opinion the best way for us to learn to operate and maneuver our twin was to just go do it.

As we could never get our schedules to sync, in the end that's what we did. And we proved our friend's advice to be correct. Logic, common sense, a healthy dose of caution, and an equally healthy dose of willingness to try, and a handy tip given to us by the selling broker during the sea trial of the boat we bought proved to be all my wife and I needed to "figure out" twin engine operation and maneuvering on our own.

We didn't read any articles or books or watch any YouTube videos (made easier as YouTube hadn't been invented yet). We just got on the boat, started it up, and started learning how to operate it.

Learning is a never-ending process, but we've learned a lot since taking our boat out for the first time.

Reading is a great way to learn theory. My first flight instructor strongly suggested that I read a book called "Stick and Rudder" before my first lesson. I did, and while I had no idea what things were going to sound, feel, and look like when I flew my first flight, I knew exactly why things were going to happen: why a plane flies (hint---it's nothing to do with Mr. Bernouli), why it climbs, descends, turns, stalls, and so on.

So I'm not disparaging reading about various aspects of boating. But this "read this article and you'll be an immediate expert" implication I see so often in various magazines is quite misleading, I think.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	115
Size:	177.5 KB
ID:	36383  
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 08:30 AM   #18
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
Yeah, but it's because the mockers are not sophisticated enough to understand my advanced docking methods. So, I just tolerate those that know not.
__________________
Don on Moonstruck
Sabre 42 Hardtop Express & Blackfin 25 CC
When cruising life is simpler, but on a grander scale (author unknown)
http://moonstruckblog.wordpress.com/
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 08:48 AM   #19
Guru
 
timjet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,905
I remember a docking fiasco last summer on Tangier Island on the Chessie. There were extreme tides causing much greater than normal currents and the wind was blowing to the extent that conversation beyond the bow of the boat was difficult.

The marina owner, an elderly gentleman was guiding me in to my assigned slip via radio. The docking situation was difficult with the current going perpendicular to the dock and running about 3 - 4 kts. The gentleman was trying to be helpful by telling me how to steer and power the boat, but as you all know, no one can guide you via radio especially when the currents and wind are making it even more difficult. You have to feel the boat and anticipate the winds and currents.

At first I was listening to his instructions but it became very apparent they were making no sense. He ultimately was confused with who I was and though he was talking to me he was using another boats name. After 3 attempts at sterning in I knew I would damage the boat if I continued this approach. I normally would have considered going elsewhere but there is nowhere else to go. This is an island and the only marina on the island. So I decided to bow in, but I knew I had to get the boat all the way in the slip to allow the pilings on the down current side to hold the boat in the slip. No way could the dock master hold the bow in the slip, the piling closest to the bulkhead would have to do that, the current was just too great.

So the challenge was to get the boat completely in the slip with the bow past the forward most piling that set 2 feet from the bulkhead. This required enough speed to get the boat all the way in the slip before the current took the bow of the boat downstream of this piling. But not too much speed that I couldn't stop the boat before I hit the bulkhead. I knew if I failed to get the bow past the piling closest to the bulkhead the boat would end up sideways in the next slip downstream and we would be in serious trouble.

So with great anticipation, hoping my insurance would cover this, and with the dock master screaming instructions to me using the wrong boat name I started down the chute. In the end all went well primarily due to me and my wife discussing in detail how I would perform and what I expected her to do. Approaching the upstream piling closest to the bulkhead by wife threw a line that was already attached to the boat to a helper who fortunately assessed the situation correctly and immediately secured it to the dock. I was able to stop the boat before the bow hit the bulkhead and the anchor pulpit being pushed by the current rested up against the downstream piling closest to the bulkhead while the stern rested against the downstream piling furthest from the bulkhead. I had to go in and out of fwd gear to keep the bow pulpit fwd of the piling while my wife and the helper adjusted the upstream bow line.
All went well, but it was a bit of a nail bitter.

An hour later a sailboat tried the same thing. On his third attempt he got the boat in the slip, but not past the piling closest to the bulkhead and ended up sideways in the next slip downstream pointed at us about 10 feet away. He was light enough that with ropes and help ashore he was able to right himself.
__________________
Tim
Tampa Bay
Carver 355 ACMY Twin Cummins Diesels Sold
timjet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2015, 09:52 AM   #20
Guru
 
mbevins's Avatar
 
City: Windsor
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Keeper IV
Vessel Model: 44 Viking ACMY
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1,305
Back to the article..

The author was writing about some yahoo entering one of the locks in the Trent-Severn System. We cruised this area a few years back. One or two locks into the system we notice that the lock master is not loading the lock in the order of first come first in. There is a large number of rental boats on the system and they have come to recognize them. So for the safety of all prudent experienced boaters they fill the lock with the rentals first, let them play bumper boat, get "tied" into place and then they let us in.
Once I realized what was happening I was very appreciative.
__________________

__________________
"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."

mbevins is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012