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Old 01-20-2015, 02:01 AM   #61
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Yep sometimes all it takes is a little hint and they will part the way !!
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Old 01-20-2015, 02:44 PM   #62
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Now here are some boaters that need a bit o' mocking to try and get them to wise up!


When we launch our tow behind runabout for weekends out-and-about in our Tolly there is often a fairly full contingent of other boats on trailers at the well-presented "two boat" launch ramp in our marina.

Most people know what to do and are courteous regarding first come first serve. Morning it's boats launching, evening it's boats loading back on trailers.

Sooo, one day, with plenty of others waiting to launch… a couple guys launched an older (18' +/-) tri hull i/o... but, they backed down mid ramp negating capability for anyone else to simultaneously use ramp. Obviously novices, but what the heck... not too bad for a minute or four it usually takes to launch a small boat off trailer.

Then the overweight idiots decided they would back so far in that they had difficulty wading to trailer to release the winch. Once released the boat rear had been in water (while still on the trailer) for several minutes. When they both pushed real hard the boat slid back – only to find they had forgotten to put in the transom drain plug and boat rear was already well filled with water – it began sinking.

Instead of immediately winching back into trailer best as possible and pulling truck a bit forward in order to get water draining back out… one jumped behind boat and tried to put his finger in the drain hole. He was way out of physical condition and began to flounder with no finger the in hole. Meantime, the other guy, (also fat and in poor condition) with wife yelling“run faster”, was running down the road to some other vehicle where they evidently had left the plug. This was all during a very hot mid summer day. Luckily another boater had spare plug and they got it in for the floundering idiot. Then the boat was pushed aside in the area and one of the guys was inside with small bucket bailing. Water level had gotten well up onto motor.


Last I saw an hour later as we passed by on Tolly’s fly-bridge, towing our runabout, was the three looking forlorn; they had motor hatch up, no starting evident.
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Old 01-20-2015, 05:23 PM   #63
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Oh Art, that post sure brought back some funny memories.

Back in the mid 80's a good friend of mine and I had a fun rituial after a day on the Gulf of Mexico out of Tarpon Springs boat ramp grouper fishing. We would recover his 25' Wellcraft Sportsmen and we would than grab a couple of cold beers and take the fish to the dock next to the boat ramp to a cleaning stand and get to work, all the while being entertained by the endless parade of boaters returning home and dealing with a busy and slippery boat ramp.

The real fun was when too small a car or truck would try to pull up a too large a boat up the ramp and would be unable to do so blocking a much needed ramp. This ramp did not have enough dock space for the number of users and patience and nerves were often very short and ragged late in the day, words and sometimes more were exchanged, often with much entertainment value.

The old salts had the recovery down to a science and could be detected from a long ways off and were a joy to watch, oh course you pretty well knew when the rookies were inbound for a landing and had no problem calling it.

Fun times, we often would stay to be entertained and offer help if it seemed we could do anything.

Boat ramps are a real eye opener as to the inhumanity of man, I often wonder how many wives were so turned off to boating by the antics of the Capt. at the boat ramp that they found excuses to stay home.

I guess it could be another thread "Are you mocked at the boat ramp"?
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Old 01-20-2015, 07:28 PM   #64
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Scott

That's another good account regarding boat ramps.

I've one that happened when I was surveying a 44' boat. Ramp was broadside, just past an elevated walkway. Gave me birds eye view and could listen to the words! Took down the boat and the tow vehicle. The hollering and attempts to get things in order lasted for a long time; funny as can be. Maybe if your suggestion for the new thread... "Are you mocked at the boat ramp" gets into play on TF I do a full accounting. It was really funny!
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Old 01-20-2015, 08:05 PM   #65
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Our first boat was trailerable, but after spending a day at the launch ramp watchin' the goin's on, we put the boat in a slip and kept it there until we sold it four years later.
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Old 01-20-2015, 09:08 PM   #66
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Strange. My previous boat was a trailerable sailboat with outboard. There was no launch-ramp drama at the now-defunct Harris Yacht Harbor in Bay Point, CA.
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Old 01-20-2015, 09:17 PM   #67
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This whole launch ramp discussion sure brings back memories, mostly of retrieving the boat in the dark after a long day on the water, mini flashlight in my teeth, trying to get it lined up with the bunks, cranking it back on the trailer. Now we just roll over in bed and turn out the reading light to drift off to sleep in the slip. It was a million times cheaper and simpler back then, but I still wouldn't trade it for what we enjoy now. Still got us out on the water though.
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Old 01-20-2015, 09:18 PM   #68
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Strange. My previous boat was a trailerable sailboat with outboard. There was no launch-ramp drama at the now-defunct Harris Yacht Harbor in Bay Point, CA.
Mark - They were afraid to make a scene. Knew your wife would take pictures!
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Old 01-20-2015, 09:23 PM   #69
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Mark - They were afraid to make a scene. Knew your wife would take pictures!
That was a previous life.
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Old 01-31-2015, 09:21 PM   #70
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twin screws

Moving away from trailer launch FUBARs and back to managing twin screws, I struggled w/ various teaching videos, photos, diagrams & articles until I stumbled on "steer it like a bicycle". Bow left, left hand rear, right hand fwd on the gears and the bow moves to port, just like the handle bars on a bike. Pay attention to the bow although it is the stern one steers stern in to the slip. Stern needs to go right, bow needs to go left, steer it like a bike. Bump it in and out of gear at idle and, lacking current and wind, back & pivot it right into the hole. With current & wind, one must practice compensation but the principle is the same. Also, the gear levers, and BTW throttle levers, are often curved inward, so .... left gear fwd. the lever curves to the right (assuming one is facing fwd.) and the bow will move starbd. If it gets dicey, where does the bow need to go to accomplish whatever is needed, steer it like a bike. Go slow. Learn to make sternway under competent control as backing against a wind or in a crowded fairway is a useful skill. Learn to maintain position - where does the bow need to go to stay in the desired position, steer it like a bike, back if needed, pivot if needed. Useful when the aforementioned (pick your bad word) skippers don't announce departing their slip on a busy Sat. morning or simply won't offer the courtesy of waiting for you to complete the docking maneuver in which you are obviously engaged. Steer it like a bicycle was a Eureka learning moment for me. Hope this is useful for you also.
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Old 01-31-2015, 09:33 PM   #71
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I simply say on a twin screw the gears work just like driving a grocery cart. Ladies really get this.
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Old 01-31-2015, 09:57 PM   #72
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Greetings,
I liken the gears to a wheelchair. Right wheel forward, left wheel back= turn to port. different strokes, same effect.
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Old 01-31-2015, 10:49 PM   #73
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I simply say on a twin screw the gears work just like driving a grocery cart. Ladies really get this.
Wifey B: Ladies? You dudes don't do groceries? Well, I do know how to operate a grocery cart so that's good.

As to the bicycle thing, lost me completely and I really don't do bicycles. Never gone for a wheelchair spin either.

Guess since I learned to boat on twins, I never realized it was complicated. Singles, I must admit, the only ones I've ever operated are our Rib's. I understand the principles of single docking and maneuvering but I'm sure doing it the first time on a large boat would be interesting. I'd go find some invisible docks out on the water and practice, practice, practice. Then practice at our dock.
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Old 02-01-2015, 01:39 AM   #74
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Twin screw boat handles similar to full-track tractors with forward reverse and throttle independently adjustable on either track. It isn't rocket science! And, similar to a tractor - take your time maneuvering when in close quarters. Heavy items (boats or tractors) can cause great damage when impacting things.
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Old 02-01-2015, 03:25 AM   #75
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The sellng broker for the GB we ultimately bought asked me at the start of the sea trial in SFO Bay if I'd ever run a twin engine boat before. I said no. He then asked me if I'd ever run a bulldozer before. I said yes, Cat D6 and D8. He said, "Well, if you think of driving a twin-engine boat the same way you drove your bulldozers you'll never have a problem knowing what to do and when."

He was right and I never have.

This analogy did not work for my wife, but the swivel-your-hips analogy did.
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Old 02-01-2015, 07:47 AM   #76
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Or skid loaders. I always found singles far harder to operate. Our Carver 32 is much easier to handle in close quarters than our 19' foot runabout.
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Old 02-01-2015, 09:27 AM   #77
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Art and Marin, why didn't I think of that. It's a slam dunk. I can't think of anyone who has not driven a bull dozer or skid loader, but of course my field is construction. There it was right in front of me, and I missed it completely.
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Old 02-01-2015, 10:41 AM   #78
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Art and Marin, why didn't I think of that. It's a slam dunk. I can't think of anyone who has not driven a bull dozer or skid loader, but of course my field is construction. There it was right in front of me, and I missed it completely.
Don - If a D10 is right in front of you with engine running at substantial rpm... better hope the operator knows what they're doing with its controls! Boat's collision is a tiny bit more forgiving!
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Old 02-01-2015, 10:52 AM   #79
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Tractors, bulldozers, skid loaders. You lost both of us on those. A good thing they aren't a required prerequisite to twin engines.
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Old 02-01-2015, 11:46 AM   #80
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Tractors, bulldozers, skid loaders. You lost both of us on those. A good thing they aren't a required prerequisite to twin engines.
Try it - You'll like it!

Full track equipment are great (a blast) to carefully and productively operate. Also, no winds, tides or currents to interfere. When you stop moving the equipment - - it STOPS moving!

Good beginner training process for twin screw boat operators.

Single screw, straight drive, boat owners... well... can you ride, steer, and back up a unicycle... if so, you'll do fine!
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