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Old 03-05-2016, 01:51 AM   #41
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Do I detect a drift to "Who has fallen due to drink"? That could take some space.
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Old 03-05-2016, 06:37 AM   #42
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Which reminds me, I have one more. Boca Grande. Docked a chartered GB 46 stern-to at a fixed dock. Buddy and I took a rented golf cart to a sports bar to watch the NBA finals. Had a little-too-large time, got back to the boat, tide had gone down, thought I'd just hop from the dock to the swim platform which was about 4 feet from the dock; I went about 3.75. Splash. Giant scrape on one shin, awoke Ann who was asleep in rear cabin. A man has to know his limitations...

And BTW we did have a soft grounding the next day coming out of the marina, but wiggled off. So count that stop as a two-fer.
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Old 03-05-2016, 06:44 AM   #43
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Amazing how many have fallen in but never gone aground or have been towed.....
Having boated almost all of the lower 48 saltwater coast, I think that is due to where a lot of people here boat, with deeper waters and rocks rather than sand, mud and shifting/shoaling channels. In 90% of the northwest you'd have to work pretty hard to go aground, whereas in much of the east, a few moments of inattention can put you in the ooze right away.
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Old 03-05-2016, 07:36 AM   #44
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I haven't gone in the drink yet but just thinking about it, I have observed at least five people fall in. That's just in seven years. Two were spirits related.
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Old 03-05-2016, 09:54 AM   #45
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From when I was young I well recall... and ...

Some here may recall tidal water Flushing Bay filth in NY, NY, during 1950's/60's. Similar (but less) filth in the waters of Hudson and Woodcleft Canals, Freeport LI. South Shore.

Well, suffice it to say... If you fell overboard back then you just might come up with surprises on your body or in your cloths.

So, the reason I post this is to say that at about ten years age I slipped off a dock on Hudson Canal, wearing a button down shirt with left hand vest pocket. I remember the incidence well - it was short sleeve, brown, checkered pattern shirt. When I grabbed dock ladder and climbed back up... there was a little present in my shirt pocket. Let's just say, it was well formed, so whosever it was must have been healthy! - LOL.

In late 50's early 60's Flushing Bay water was often so dirty that when I pulled in anchor rode it was too often required that I pull "tissues" off the line before dropping it down the deck hole.

Although I've not returned to those locations since late 1960's I understand that a lot had been done to improve water "content" conditions.
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Old 03-05-2016, 10:19 AM   #46
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My first incidence of falling overboard was when I could just walk fairly well... probably at about 3 to 4 years age. BTW - I've been blessed with extremely clear memory of pointed items in all my past years. To me, this one was very pointed!

Anyway... Dad was working on Johnson o/b of our wooden boat with small cabin. I was on the dock (no floating docks in most marinas back then) and tide was low (meaning probably about 5' to 6' below dock platform). Through slits between dock planks I noticed a blue claw crab on mud flat by a rear piling under the dock. I went to forward edge of dock (dad just about directly below there working on the Johnson o/b) and I leaned over the edge to see the crab. Leaned too far... next I knew dad had me by the torso and was pulling me out of the water. That was scary as hell. Back then it produced a fear of heights in me that was unusual and unrealistic. "Crazy" Charlie was the owner of the marina and my friend. Would take too long to fully describe his way of curing my height-fear, but, it was Charley that eventually cured my fear of heights (via intimidation, cajoling and than praise). Since that time of life I've been a climber to all sorts of height... with no fear. THANK YOU Charlie!
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Old 03-05-2016, 07:03 PM   #47
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Just glad none of you fell off a cruise ship as another one did today.

Coast Guard Searches for Missing Royal Caribbean Ship Passenger - ABC News
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Old 03-05-2016, 07:23 PM   #48
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B-I have often wondered, if you fall off a cruise ship, how long does it take for a 900' long, 150' high ship doing 18-20 knots to disappear from view? I am guessing not very long. Even if someone sees you go overboard, and notifies the crew as fast as possible, by the time the ship slows, turns and reverses course, you are toast.
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Old 03-05-2016, 07:33 PM   #49
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B-I have often wondered, if you fall off a cruise ship, how long does it take for a 900' long, 150' high ship doing 18-20 knots to disappear from view? I am guessing not very long. Even if someone sees you go overboard, and notifies the crew as fast as possible, by the time the ship slows, turns and reverses course, you are toast.
Almost all cruise ships are equipped with numerous thermal cameras looking at the water alongside and astern, just in the event of someone falling, pushed or jumped into the water.

It happens far more frequently that most realize.
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Old 03-05-2016, 07:37 PM   #50
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Many cruise ships have "fast recovery" boats (in addition to lifeboats and tenders), so I suspect that a cruise ship could respond within a half-hour. Still, that doesn't mean they'll find the overboard passenger. Nevertheless, considering the heights of railings, cruise-ship overboards are likely to be suicides, murder victims, or Darwin at work eliminating idiots.

By the way, we always take the cheap inboard cabins; thus no way to fall from a cabin's balcony.

On our first cruise there was an overboard suicide. Could have been more on our cruise-ship adventures, but it's not publicly announced aboard.
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Old 03-05-2016, 08:02 PM   #51
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Many cruise ships have "fast recovery" boats (in addition to lifeboats and tenders), so I suspect that a cruise ship could respond within a half-hour. Still, that doesn't mean they'll find the overboard passenger. Nevertheless, considering the heights of railings, cruise-ship overboards are likely to be suicides, murder victims, or Darwin at work eliminating idiots.

By the way, we always take the cheap inboard cabins; thus no way to fall from a cabin's balcony.

On our first cruise there was an overboard suicide. Could have been more on our cruise-ship adventures, but it's not publicly announced aboard.
Yes, Royal Caribbean had a jumper in November. More of the "cruise ship deaths" are actually on extra activities undertaken while cruising.

Cruise Ship Deaths - Recent Cruise Ship Deaths - The Names of Passenger, Crew Who Died on a Cruise Ships - Overboard Cruise Ship, Missing Never Found
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Old 03-06-2016, 01:19 AM   #52
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A recent coronial inquiry here concerned the loss overboard of a couple from a cruise ship. The Coroner thought the guy was breaking up with the girl, she was on the railing threatening to jump unless he abandoned breaking up, she fell but probably not intentionally (her conduct was found to be a form of negotiation), he dived in after her, both were lost. Proved he cared to some degree. But at what price,to what end?
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Old 03-06-2016, 01:36 AM   #53
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You ever go over?....On the hook one time hear a scream and a splash. Non swimmer, somehow went over the bow rail up at the pulpit. Never did tell us what she was doing up there. I have an idea...[/SIZE][/FONT] [/FONT][/SIZE]
Nope, never, but then again, I'm like a veritable cat, I'm so nimble...

Bugger...probably jinxed m'self now...betta watchit closely for a while...
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Old 03-06-2016, 12:00 PM   #54
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As a kid on vacation at Lake George, NY I stepped backward on a dock and caught my heal on a cleat... In my late 20's I purchased a MAAS Aero open water rowing scull and went over. It was the first day I was learning to row. Not just the first day but the first time I sat in the scull. I quickly learned the key to balance is to securely hold both oars outward. It only happened that once; since then (many years have gone by) I have literally rowed in all types of sea's and weather for several thousands of miles in a variety of sliding seat sculls and skiffs without going over. I'm not sure that this last one counts because I only went in up to below my knees. It was on my previous boat an express cruiser at the fixed dock at Claudio's Resturant in Greenport, NY. My wife was tying off the stern and I was standing on the bow. I attempted to step off the bow onto the dock as the bow was slowly drifting outward. I stepped short, my foot slid off the bulkhead edge, and I fell straight between the boat and bulkhead. I caught one arm on the dock and one arm on the bow rail. I hung there with my feet in the water till I could pull myself out. Very painful and lots of black and blue under my arms and on my sides. I wished I had just gone straight into the water.
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Old 03-06-2016, 02:16 PM   #55
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Many times I flipped my Sunfish sailboat learning to gybe. Last time I went in "unintentionally" I was paddling my canoe one cool December day with my dog in the front. He saw a cormorant surface near the boat and spun around to have a look. He went one way and I went another and over we went. He being the spry doggie he is, never fell out. I however landed in about three feet of water with a very muddy bottom. Had to slide the canoe, with the dog watching worriedly over to a railroad bridge embankment so I could stand up, roll the canoe over to get the water out and re-board. Luckily we were only about 1/4 mile from our house and dock so didn't have time to get very chilled. The dog loves to ride on the canoe and boat with us. but you gotta watch out!

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Old 03-09-2016, 08:50 PM   #56
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Fell over three times. First two were dumb ass stupidity. The last one should have killed me if it weren't for shear luck. I was trying to keep a 20 ft Wellcraft with a dead engine away from a rock seawall with a telescoping boathook. It held for a while then telescoped in under pressure and I went over the bow rail in a second. I landed head first in 2 feet of water on a flat jetty rock. As close to being KO'd in my life ever. My left hand karate chopped a pointy rock that tore my watch off and caused my wrist to swell up double sized. Had my head hit that rock, I would not be here today. I now wear an inflatable on the trawler any time we are underway and back home on the CC when fishing alone.
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Old 03-10-2016, 09:12 AM   #57
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Yep!

Going ashore in the dinghy, I stepped off the swim platform, took my usual seat on the starboard tube next to the swim platform and started the outboard. My wife handed me the puppy (she was wearing her life jacket).

Then, my wife, instead of stepping into the dinghy and taking her usual seat forward on the port side, decided it would be easier just to slide off the swim platform onto the starboard tube (where I was already sitting).

What we learned that day (and I already knew) was that the person limit on one tube of our dinghy is one.

The dinghy flipped and all three of us went into the water. Fortunately, it was still tied to the boat and it righted itself without losing the outboard, camera, handheld VHF, cell phone, etc.

My wife grabbed the puppy by the handle on her DFD and put her on the swim platform. I told my wife to pull out the swim ladder and we climbed back on board.

We dried ourselves off, got back on the dinghy (the right way) and went to shore.
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Old 03-10-2016, 09:13 AM   #58
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Scott, all the above here.

For the rest of the story-----the tech was on the gunnel. I was on the finger. During trying to get the new pedestal over the rail, it was on the rail. The weight shifted my way a little. I stepped back tripping on the steps behind me. The tech was able to hold on to the pedestal.

Your concern about my cuts and scrapes makes me feel all warm and fuzzy. I am happy to report that no infection resulted from the oyster and barnacle cuts. I'm sure that eases your mind.

When Lou got back to the boat I was in the shower. She did want to know where all the blood on the cockpit floor came from.
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Old 03-10-2016, 09:48 AM   #59
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Don...sorry... Each and every event whether falling in, aground or towed could be anything from life threatening or comical. Didn't mean to poke fun at anyone except those that I feel will admit to falling in yet their pride about being a "captain" makes their memory fuzzy about other skills. I could be wrong but as long as I have been around boats at all levels and a tow guy for 13 years...I have heard a lot of "gray" stories.


If it ever happens again...and you get cut...just pour some of that green stuff Blue brought to the get together..bet it will work!

I slipped off a jetty back around when Jaws was filmed and the barnacles had their way with the backs of my legs...still have some small scars. Well, when the large cloud of red formed around me....some pretty scary thoughts almost made me walk on water.

Again sorry to all those that have had traumatic events...to all those closet grounders or tow jobs.....
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Old 03-10-2016, 09:56 AM   #60
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Again sorry to all those that have had traumatic events...to all those closet grounders or tow jobs.....
Relax!
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