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Old 10-01-2017, 10:44 AM   #1
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WWYD? Being away from boat for a couple years

It seems silly to ask a bunch of strangers this question but I value all perspectives so here goes.

I am seriously contemplating taking a job opportunity that is land locked. I'd think about it as a 3 or 4yr thing. I would then be back to live-aboard cruising after that.

Maybe you all can talk me out of that?? What is your calculus for time on the boat vs. squirreling away more boat bucks?

I don't have to take it. I can actually live just fine without it and I can live aboard and cruise somewhat indefinitely without. But it would bring more financial comfort if I did do it.

I could keep the boat maybe south florida and vacation in winter there, then in the final year pull it out and do all the refitting I want to do anyway and then splash for good.

First world problems... I know.. but still need to decide

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Old 10-01-2017, 11:01 AM   #2
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What's the cost of storage vs selling and buying again in 2-4 years? No offense as I love Bayliner 38's and would own one in a heartbeat if our plans so dictated but they're not exactly in short supply either.

I'm in a somewhat similar situation as we will permanently relocate soon. Our choice is total liquidation of all but some tools and a couple antiques.
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:12 PM   #3
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Greetings,
Mr. krm. Mr. CP's post is exactly what entered my mind. Storage vs sell and re-buy. 2-4 years could easily become 3-5 or 4-6 (don't ask me how I know).
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:18 PM   #4
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Boats don't do well being ignored. Unless there is someone to look after it while you're away for an extended period of time then in my opinion it's best to sell now and re buy when you can take care of it unless of course it's a family heirloom.
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:21 PM   #5
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We chose happy & humble over chasing dollars, figuring that in the end, memories banked will be more important than monies banked.

Then again, once in a while, I want more stuff...
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Old 10-01-2017, 12:56 PM   #6
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We chose happy & humble over chasing dollars, figuring that in the end, memories banked will be more important than monies banked.

Then again, once in a while, I want more stuff...
I like it.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:04 PM   #7
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I agree with those that advise just selling it and buying another IF and when you want to go back to cruising; a lot of good points made in the above posts thereto especially the cost to store and properly maintain it while you are away. We've been in a similar position ourselves and while we miss the boat tremendously, I am glad we sold it. For instance, in our case, I severed my an achilles tendon not long afterwards and couldn't of used the boat for almost a year if I had it. And as someone alluded to, time can get away from you. Our original plan of living aboard and cruising full time was supposed to be a couple of years. That stretched out to almost 6, then part time for about another year. Chartering a cruising boat is cheaper and MUCH less hassle than owning one if you only use it a couple weeks a year.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:21 PM   #8
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For that long a time, I would sell. When you come back, you will probably want something different anyway. For a shorter period, I would shrinkwrap with good vents.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:45 PM   #9
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The piece of missing information is how far from the boat or the nearest water you will be. You're talking a boat that could even be used inland. To me, it's all about whether you could use it at all or how much. Then it's what you see after this hiatus and it's likelihood of really happening. RTF mentions 2-3 years turning into more. Also, the possibility of you heading in a very different direction after the 2-3 years and it might not be the boat you'd want or need.

My goal would be keeping the boat, but not if that involves high cost and little use plus a substantial risk you won't be back to it in 2-3 years.

I find projecting the future extremely difficult so holding on to something based on that projection perhaps unwise if there's a cost associated with doing so.
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Old 10-01-2017, 11:51 PM   #10
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The piece of missing information is how far from the boat or the nearest water you will be. You're talking a boat that could even be used inland. To me, it's all about whether you could use it at all or how much. Then it's what you see after this hiatus and it's likelihood of really happening. RTF mentions 2-3 years turning into more. Also, the possibility of you heading in a very different direction after the 2-3 years and it might not be the boat you'd want or need.

My goal would be keeping the boat, but not if that involves high cost and little use plus a substantial risk you won't be back to it in 2-3 years.

I find projecting the future extremely difficult so holding on to something based on that projection perhaps unwise if there's a cost associated with doing so.
Interesting many of your are talking about selling the boat which is assuming I'm taking the job. The real question is giving up a few years of cruising for more money a good decision

I do agree re: selling how much I will use it is a key factor to consider. It would take all day to get to boat if I did Keys (The job is in Minneapolis). I'd expect to use the boat 2-3 times per year.

I am primarily more concerned about the TIME. If I were to sell it, go work (for whatever period), then buy something and get it fitted the way I want, the buying and fitting would eat up at least an entire year post job - whereas right now I'm at the tail end of my year of refitting getting ready for bigger adventures. So if I could store the boat for $20K in today's dollars for four years I'd save myself a year of time. I think I'd make that investment, without hesitation.
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Old 10-02-2017, 12:05 AM   #11
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If you`ve got the Bayliner how you want it, balancing the cost to sell and buy and getting the new one how you want it, storage must be tempting.
Wild card is coming back burdened with cash after 3-4 years in what must be an attractive job and wanting to upgrade. Then the storage will seem a waste of $, especially with any non use degradation. And it will probably have lost some $ value over the period.
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Old 10-02-2017, 02:52 AM   #12
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Financial comfort you said. That's always good to have. It would need to be a significant amount, but I would probably take the job, sell the boat and buy another a year or so before you quit the job or return 'home'.

That way you can get the time consuming work done on the boat by others, and have it ready to move aboard when you return. This acknowledges that the definition of a cruising boat is one you move from place to place while completing R&M.
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Old 10-02-2017, 04:26 AM   #13
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I think your time assessment is correct. Figure a year to buy another boat and get it set is as you want. And also as much as a year to sell your current boat, and the need to keep it in top condition for showing while you are elsewhere. As for buying and refit, I would not don it from a distance while still working. I would want to be nearby and monitoring on a near daily basis.

Given that'd probably pickle the boat if it's less than 3-4 year, and sell if it's more. Of course your time frame falls right in the margin :-). And if you pickle the boat, plan an a bunch of work to get it going again.

Given all the hassle, the $$ would have to be pretty compelling to make sense.
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Old 10-02-2017, 05:16 AM   #14
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Kev,

My first thought is to skip the Minneapolis job, and find something that produces the revenue you need where you are. There's tons of things for an enterprising person.

If you take it, I'd absolutely sell the boat... even at a loss, rather than store it. OR, find some responsible person to lease it from you at a very reasonable rate that will take care of it. Even if they messed it up a bit, would probably be cheaper than storage. And you could take it to Minneapolis and operate it on the Mississippi or St. Croix up there.

Now, I did exactly what you did many years ago. I moved from FL to Minneapolis for a substantial career move, but it wasn't a temporary thing and had no big boats to sell. I really disliked Minneapolis, and found it WAY overrated for a place to live. Hated the winters and the high cost of living. Couldn't get out of there fast enough.

And you might feel the same about moving to a frozen tundra with high costs and very socialistic. You don't say where you're currently living, but I'd bet a LOT warmer that Minneapolis. You could end up hating the place, and the job and be just miserable for 4 year. No amount of $ is worth that.
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Old 10-02-2017, 08:14 AM   #15
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I think your time assessment is correct. Figure a year to buy another boat and get it set is as you want. And also as much as a year to sell your current boat, and the need to keep it in top condition for showing while you are elsewhere. As for buying and refit, I would not don it from a distance while still working. I would want to be nearby and monitoring on a near daily basis.

Given that'd probably pickle the boat if it's less than 3-4 year, and sell if it's more. Of course your time frame falls right in the margin :-). And if you pickle the boat, plan an a bunch of work to get it going again.

Given all the hassle, the $$ would have to be pretty compelling to make sense.
The money is good - about 5 times a year what I need for cruising all in.

The thought that is sticking with me right now is I left a similarly lucrative job in 2012 to travel and work remotely, which lead to boating. This was before I even turned 40.

I have never ever looked back on that decision and said "I sure wish I would have kept working my corporate job"

Thank you all for your ideas and thoughts. So good to have a discussion even if its with strangers
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Old 10-02-2017, 08:19 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kev_rm View Post
It seems silly to ask a bunch of strangers this question but I value all perspectives so here goes.

I am seriously contemplating taking a job opportunity that is land locked. I'd think about it as a 3 or 4yr thing. I would then be back to live-aboard cruising after that.

Maybe you all can talk me out of that?? What is your calculus for time on the boat vs. squirreling away more boat bucks?


My recommendation, sell the boat. In 3 or 4 years, the electronics will be 3 or 4 years older and superseded with new "stuff". Engines not started for 3 or 4 years.... a need to replace all batteries, stagnate fuel, water etc.

Wet storage: Not a good idea.... IMO No one can look after your boat as well as you.
On the hard: Expensive, I think. Need at least one dehumidifier, open and empty all cabinets and engine compartment and every other storage area.
Side note: I had my first boat in a yard. The boat was broken into and easy to remove electronics stolen. Yard comment: Not our problem. They weren't too agreeable when my Nordhavn 46 fell off the jacks and drove the port stabilizer into the owner's stateroom = constructive loss.

Think of the "joy and happiness" of the refit of a new/newer boat, oh joy.
I agree with the comment, 'Buy the boat a year ahead and have professionals do the work.' Of course, you should visit the boat during this refit to comment on progress, changes and further upgrades.
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Old 10-02-2017, 08:33 AM   #17
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We live a long way from our vessel, but we are safely retired. Many in our marina do likewise. If you have good watchers and yards available for hire that may be an option provided you can get to the vessel several times a season to work it out.

Also, many lay their boats up for 6 or 7 months during winter seasons. Would your situation be much different?

But, the costs to safely store the vessel vs the vessel's worth need to be taken into account. Me, I followed the money, every time. Bought and sold a lot of boats doing it.
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Old 10-02-2017, 09:04 AM   #18
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Interesting many of your are talking about selling the boat which is assuming I'm taking the job. The real question is giving up a few years of cruising for more money a good decision

I do agree re: selling how much I will use it is a key factor to consider. It would take all day to get to boat if I did Keys (The job is in Minneapolis). I'd expect to use the boat 2-3 times per year.

I am primarily more concerned about the TIME. If I were to sell it, go work (for whatever period), then buy something and get it fitted the way I want, the buying and fitting would eat up at least an entire year post job - whereas right now I'm at the tail end of my year of refitting getting ready for bigger adventures. So if I could store the boat for $20K in today's dollars for four years I'd save myself a year of time. I think I'd make that investment, without hesitation.
If I was going to move to Minneapolis, even though the boating season there is short, I'd still move my boat there or close to there. Plenty of boating in the vicinity.

Now, as to whether you should take the job or not only you can tell. Too many factors that none of us know. They include your current job and financial situation. Also, what kind of contract you will get and how well you can depend on the job being what you think it is and lasting. Then the key one is, assuming it's all you think, is it worth it. If you believe you will be happy living there and in the job, then it's one thing. However, if you think you'll be unhappy and it's just for the money, that's quite a different story.

During my career, my wife and I said no to many potential moves as we were too happy where we were, with the life we had. We didn't want to live in NYC or Omaha. Which brings a question. You don't mention family. Do you have one? If so, what are their thoughts and what about their happiness?
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Old 10-02-2017, 10:29 AM   #19
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I’m a guy that has many times chosen lifestyle over career.
I live on a lake in Alaska, too far from Anchorage to commute daily. I’ve have had employeers go so far as offer to buy my home as part of a relocation package, to stay with them, and assume a new position.

Every time I had the choice I chose lakefront life over all else, much to the dismay of others who made different choices. I have been called a “free spirit” and even “not a team plater” for choosing my life over career.

In the end...

The sun is going to come up in an hour or so, and the lake will be there. The birds are training teir young to fly south, and the water creatures that stay are making preparations for winter. I get to see all that.

So...

My recommendation to you is to enjoy your life. Make it your first priority. Work to live, and let others live to work.
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Old 10-02-2017, 12:44 PM   #20
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During my career, my wife and I said no to many potential moves as we were too happy where we were, with the life we had. We didn't want to live in NYC or Omaha. Which brings a question. You don't mention family. Do you have one? If so, what are their thoughts and what about their happiness?
No kids (other than the 4-legged kind) and I am solo.. once again

I had not considered moving the boat closer. I may ask around about facilities and conditions. I assumed everything was frozen in winter.. It would certainly be possible to do that portion of the loop in sections, might take a year of long weekends and vacation weeks.. but interesting.
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