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Old 10-05-2013, 07:40 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooksie View Post
I wrote a manual for my boat (for my kids actually) but instead of a list of things, it is an operators manual. How to operate everything, engine, battery switches, winch, dinghy tackle, fuel valves, filling tanks, propane system, pumps, alarms, refer, and so on.
A stranger should be able to step aboard with this "manual" and set off on a safe passage.
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaHorse II View Post
Al, I'm a little confused. Although your list is impressive, is it really an "Operations Manual" much like a car has? Are all the entries subtitles with following explanations as to how to actually operate the equipment?

I like the idea of making a "list" but to my way of thinking, it mainly serves as an inventory list and not a "how to operate the equipment" list.

If I'm dead wrong (and lately I have been) and your intent is to actually write a "how to" operations manual, I can't imagine taking on that task!

As you know, I live in literalville and when I see something titled as "Operations & Systems", by reading it, I expect to know how to operate the equipment. Is that your intent?
I could have been more clear. I have written about 20 pages so far in rough draft which cover the sections listed above. This "list" is a copy of my Table of Contents. I thought I'd spare you all 20 pages of details.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irdiverdan View Post
FlyWright...You are probably already doing this but if not, you may want add a "Troubleshooting Guide" section for some "Mission Critical" systems as well. Of course, the manufactures manuals which you are including probably already have one...but if you have time, you could take some of the critical systems individual manuals troubleshooting guides and compile them in a separate section so a user could find and refer to them quickly and not have to look through each individual manual, especially if time was of the essence...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irdiverdan View Post
FlyWright, Being a literalist as well, based on your description of what you are producing, it sounds more like a "Systems Operation and Maintenance Manual" AKA "Systems O&M"...
My intent is to write an Operation Manual. Including troubleshooting notes by system could be helpful. For example, If the inverter power fails, check power switch position and fuse condition, but too much of that sort of thing can muddy up a succinct Ops Manual. I already have an Perkins Engine Maintenance Manual in which I record notes as needed. A separate document records scheduled and repair maintenance as it is completed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluto View Post
Anyone that needs a little more capability than 'Paint' can download a free upgrade called Paint.net. It can be downloaded for free from here:

Paint.NET - Free Software for Digital Photo Editing

Like paint but has more features. There is documentation here:

Paint.NET Documentation
Quote:
Originally Posted by OFB View Post
You could always start a "manual" on the vessel by using your survey.
Good idea, guys. I'll look into the Paint.net. To date MS Paint has done what I needed, but it sounds interesting. I also like the idea of using the survey as a guide. I found the information in it helpful, but its layout is, as Spock would say, "Less than logical, Captain!" I'll include it in the "General" chapter.

I'll also look for the fill-in-the-blanks version online for layout ideas.
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Old 10-05-2013, 08:09 PM   #22
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To expound on Walt's question, here's an example of the draft I have written for the Propulsion and Bow Equipment. The intent is to describe the system connections, features, brief history and unique characteristics. (Note: This is just the an early draft.)

Propulsion


FlyWright is powered by two natural Perkins 4.236 Engines. Each engine is rated at 85HP. The engines and transmissions are controlled from each of two helms; lower and flybridge with traditional controls.
Borg Warner CR-2 Velvet Drive Transmissions
Each transmission is 2:1 reduction ratio and turns CW. Transmission fluid is -----------------. Capacity is -------------------------.

Fuel System


The diesel fuel tanks are located in the engine room outboard and aft of the transmissions. The aluminum fuel tanks were replaced by the previous owner in 2006. Each tank (PORT and STBD) is 125 US gallons for a total capacity of 250 gallons. Each side of the fuel system is completely independent without a crossover or interconnect capability. Each tank was fitted with an 8 inch Seabuilt access plate in 2013. Each tank feeds only its respective engine and is equipped with a shutoff valve at the tank, dual Racor primary fuel filters mounted inboard of each tank and engine mounted secondary filters. Each filter element is rated at 2 microns. The set of Racor filters are selectable 1 or 2 so that one filter element is available at the ready if filter blockage occurs.


The fuel gages are located at the center of the lower helm overhead panel. These gages indicate lower than is actually in the tanks. Full tanks appear as 2/3 full on the gages, 2/3 tanks appear as ½ full on the gages. ½ full tanks appear as ¼ full on the gages.
Running Gear
The dripless shaft logs were installed by the previous owner prior to 2006 during the fuel tank replacement. Each prop shaft is 1 ¼ inch diameter. The PORT shaft, strut and PSS was damaged and replaced in 2009 after a submerged vessel was struck. The STBD strut was also replaced at this time and the bottom was painted.
The props are 3-bladed, bronze 20x18. Both props were tuned and balanced in 2009 and were Prop Scan tuned in 2012 by Thomas Marine Propeller of Rancho Cordova, CA.

Bow
The Lewmar 1000 Windlass was installed in 2010 and has a control mounted at the lower helm and a wireless remote control.
There are 3 anchors: 1) 15 Kg Bruce-style anchor mounted at the bow, 2) Large Danforth anchor stored in ER, aft port side, 3) Small Danforth anchor stored in ER aft of Port fuel tank.


The anchor combination rode consists of the following: 120 ft of 5/16 G4 galvanized chain and 240 ft of 5/8 8-plait Brait. The rode is marked as follows: 10 ft – 2 white tie wraps, 30 ft 1 black tie wrap, 60 ft 2 black tie wraps, 90 ft 3 black tie wraps, 120 ft (end of chain/beginning of Brait) 120 ft marker, 150 ft marker, 180 ft marker, etc. to 360 ft (every 30 ft). The end is secured with a wooden stop to prevent loss of rode. A strong, sharp knife is stored to port of the anchor locker in case the Brait needs to be cut away in an emergency.
The anchor can be secured with a safety lanyard located on the PORT side of the bow pulpit. When attached to the anchor chain, unintentional deployment of the anchor is prevented.



When anchored, it is important to unload the windlass by securing the rode to the stainless steel cleat forward of the windlass or by using the anchor snubber when only chain is being used. The snubber can be attached to the chain via hook and to the Sampson post via the line.
A raw water washdown is located on the bow for anchor washing and is described in the Plumbing section.

I will include pictures as needed to illustrate components and have system schematics where helpful, e.g. electrical system.

The manufacturer's component manuals list complete operation instructions, but this manual organizes and integrates that info for easy access. I will not attempt to rewrite all of the individual mfr instructions, but the manuals will be included in this manual.

Besides helping others operate the boat or understand the boat's systems, the manual will become an asset in resale for the next owner.
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:29 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
This "list" is a copy of my Table of Contents.
That's what I thought! My hat's off to you...I wouldn't even attempt to do that. I have manuals for everything on board and a rather "rough" owner's manual that came with the boat but one couldn't operate the boat just by reading it. Some experience is required but that's OK with me as I'll never sell, donate or give the boat to someone who is a newbie.
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:35 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
The manufacturer's component manuals list complete operation instructions, but this manual organizes and integrates that info for easy access. I will not attempt to rewrite all of the individual mfr instructions, but the manuals will be included in this manual.

Besides helping others operate the boat or understand the boat's systems, "the manual will become an asset in resale for the next owner."
Nice!
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Old 10-05-2013, 09:53 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyWright View Post
My intent is to write an Operation Manual. Including troubleshooting notes by system could be helpful. For example, If the inverter power fails, check power switch position and fuse condition, but too much of that sort of thing can muddy up a succinct Ops Manual. I already have an Perkins Engine Maintenance Manual in which I record notes as needed. A separate document records scheduled and repair maintenance as it is completed.
I agree too much in the troubleshooting section could muddy it up...especially since most of the present equipment O&M probably have that in them anyway...I was thinking of only doing it for some mission critical systems and even then maybe just the top 2 or 3 things which a user might check based on your prior experience(s) with the boat...but I believe that is what you have in mind anyway...
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:57 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaHorse II View Post
That's what I thought! My hat's off to you...I wouldn't even attempt to do that. I have manuals for everything on board and a rather "rough" owner's manual that came with the boat but one couldn't operate the boat just by reading it. Some experience is required but that's OK with me as I'll never sell, donate or give the boat to someone who is a newbie.
It took me a good part of 3 years to get to the point where I felt I understood the systems. The boat came with many manuals for items like refrigerator, water pump, radios, radar, etc, but nothing like a Californian manual to summarize the entire boat. Even today after 7 years of operating my boat, I'm still learning its hidden nuances.

This won't be an instruction manual to teach how to drive a boat, but it will help a new operator familiarize himself with the systems if I'm not there to help.

It might sound geeky, but I'm enjoying putting this together in a single source reference. I must have too much time on my hands.
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Old 10-06-2013, 12:06 AM   #27
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It might sound geeky, but I'm enjoying putting this together in a single source reference. I must have too much time on my hands.
It does & you do......(But I admire the effort. )
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Old 10-06-2013, 04:11 AM   #28
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Hey Al, when you're done with your book you can write the O & M manual on mine
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Old 10-06-2013, 07:17 AM   #29
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A PDL (pass down log) is great for the next owener , but most important is an emergency section.

Engine overheating, engine not making full power or RPM, bilge alarm ect.
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Old 10-07-2013, 11:38 AM   #30
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I'm thinkin' a look at my boat's maintenance log might scare away a potential buyer, especially a newbie who thinks a boat is like a car, "just turn the key and off you go." After thirteen years of D.I.Y. ownership, the pages have really piled up. Might make a book out of it titled," The Agony and the Ecstasy."
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:55 PM   #31
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Quote:
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I'm thinkin' a look at my boat's maintenance log might scare away a potential buyer, especially a newbie who thinks a boat is like a car, "just turn the key and off you go." After thirteen years of D.I.Y. ownership, the pages have really piled up. Might make a book out of it titled," The Agony and the Ecstasy."

Or perhaps you might title it "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly."
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Old 10-07-2013, 02:19 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ancora View Post
I'm thinkin' a look at my boat's maintenance log might scare away a potential buyer, especially a newbie who thinks a boat is like a car, "just turn the key and off you go." After thirteen years of D.I.Y. ownership, the pages have really piled up. Might make a book out of it titled," The Agony and the Ecstasy."
Mine's been War and Peace...is seems that long and the boat has fought me every step of the way at the dock...then was near flawless on last winters 4 month.2000 mile cruise.

If boats don't have personalities...then spirits may have taken over mine...
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Old 10-07-2013, 02:53 PM   #33
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Here is an article that I wrote on the topic and following it is the ENTIRE OPERATIONS MANUAL for the boat.

This is NOT a parts list, it is what to do and how to do it to run the boat, even if you have never been on board.

CCC

Preamble: This is a revision of an article that I did a few years ago for the
MTOA magazine. I have updated it and present it to you again in an effort
to instill the desirability and yes the NEED for each of us to have one on
our boats, as I suggested in my report at the Jacksonville rendezvous.

Operation Manual For Your Boat

At a MTOA Rendezvous in St Augustine, Fla. one couple had to leave due to a
family emergency. Since they had come on their trawler style boat the
problem of getting it home arose. Recall that boats are not like cars, every boat is different. Think about it, could your spouse operate the boat if the Captain is not there or
Incapacitated?
Anyway, all worked out after the volunteers had several hours of instruction from the owners, with serious note taking. This got me
to thinking of such a problem, as THE WIFE and I are now making much longer
cruises (as in the Great Circle for our third year). I have had CCRIDER 23yrs and
have 13, count them, 13 loose-leaf volumes covering every piece of equipment
and system on the boat. There are dozens of wiring diagrams and notes on how
I did repairs. This, so that I do not have to re invent the wheel!!!
I have also made a conscious effort to garner phone numbers and addresses of
vendors of all equipment. These have proved invaluable when repair parts or
service was needed. Even though all of this info is well categorized it does
NOT tell HOW TO OPERATE THE BOAT! The incident at St. Augustine moved us to
action-- fortunately not like EX-LAX, I digress. THE WIFE and I have
completed a first rate, if I do say so myself, OPERATION MANUAL. It was not
a difficult task but it certainly took a lot of thought. Ours fills 12
typed pages in, basically, outline form. We attempted to present it in such
a fashion that anyone might go on board and SAFELY operate every system with
ease. Not only are all systems described in detail but there are full, step
by step instructions on such esoteric topics as: How to take on fuel, change
fuel filters, operate the entire sewer and refrigeration systems to name a
few. Everything is covered right down to which circuit breakers should be on
for any given function.

The index is a follows:

Electrical
12v
120v
Gen. Set
Fuel
Water
Refrigeration
Main Engine Starting
Tools
spare parts
Sewer
Lazarette
Stove
Emergency Gear
Bilge pumps
The following is an example:
-----------------------------
4- WATER
There are 3 tanks each holding 125 gallons. The engine room has two, one
each side aft of the fuel tanks. Each tank has a deck fill. The aft tanks
deck fills are the first ones from the transom. The forward tank's deck fill
is forward on the starboard side. (There are brass placards on the side of
the cabin) To maintain proper trim of the vessel use both aft tanks at the
same time. Valves for each are located at the base of each tank. There is a
valve near the base of the Fresh Water Pump that will isolate BOTH of the
tanks. The Fresh Water Pump is located on the starboard forward portion of
the engine room.
The third water tank is forward of the engine room and is accessed through
the hatch in the hallway. The valve for this tank is located below the fresh
eater pump and is just forward of the valve controlling the aft water tanks.
NOTE: There is a complete replacement fresh water pump stored in the engine
room starboard aft along with many misc. parts. There is a sight gauge on
the starboard aft water tank: to operate, open the valve on it.
0000000000000000000000000000000000

OPERATION MANUAL FOR CC RIDER
PREAMBLE:
Please do not attempt to operate CC Rider without first reviewing this entire manual. It is not a new boat, therefore, many additions and changes have been made.
On the chart table there are 9 binders containing information on every system and accessory on board.
There are wiring diagrams and notes on all installations and even maintenance records. I have endeavored, in the binders. to detail “how” to perform numerous maintenance procedures and repairs By way of example:
Head Alternator replacement
Fresh water pump Graphic depiction of engine gauges
Pat has prepared an Index that is in each binder.
1 ELECTRICAL
a. 12 volt
b. 120 volt
2 GEN SET
3 FUEL
4 WATER
5 REFRIGERATION
6 MAIN ENGINES, STARTING
7 TOOLS
8 SPARE PARTS
9 SEWER
10 LAZARETTE
11 EMERGENCY GEAR
12 BILGE PUMPS
13 STOVE
1- ELECTRICAL
CAVEAT: Leave the battery selector switch in the “1” position. DO NOT MOVE. The House bank is “1” on the battery selector switch and is the Starboard bank. This bank is not used to start the engines UNLESS the selector switch is in the “2” or “all” position. DO NOT do this unless an emergency and then immediately return switch to “1” position after the engines are started. (aside: The starboard bank powers the house. The Port bank starts all 3 engines. When the battery selector switch is in the “1” position the starting battery is isolated from the house.)



12 volt- There are three 12-volt panels. The main 12-volt panel is below the green line on the factory panel. This is Number One
Main 12 volt panel-
 “Overhead Console” breaker controls most of the overhead console.
1) Main engine exhaust temperature alarm
2) CD player & radio
3) Fan
4) Chart table light
5) GPS (Port side)
6) Depth Finder (P/H)
 SUMP PUMP breaker evacuates the Grey Water tank located under the guest stateroom bed. It also has a float switch that operates even when this switch is in the “off” position. If this pump needs service, it and the float switch are mounted on a sheet of aluminum and may be lifted from the tank with all wires and discharge line attached. You will have to move the spare wheel and lift the bed board to get to them.
The two auxiliary 12-volt panels are self-explanatory. The one with the aluminum plate “ number 3” has fuses inside the electrical cabinet.

The inverter over the chart table is fused inside the cabinet.
To check the condition of the House Battery Bank, push the button over the voltmeter on the electrical panel box wall.
110 Volt Panels – The 110 volt breakers on the Main Panel are above the green tapeline. There is an additional 110volt panel inside the electrical cabinet. It controls;
Both A/C units
Engine Room Lights
Air compressor
Outlets that are not original equipment
There are two selectors switches for these panels, one for the main panel and one for the one inside the electrical cabinet. The one inside the electric box is for the A/C units and some receptacles , as noted above.
Shore power cords & connectors;
One is primarily for the A/C
One is for the House
There is an assortment of pigtails and 110v and 220v under the Pilot House bunk portside
2- GENERATOR SET
There are 2 breakers on the port side forward on the gen. set.
When the gen. set is started be sure to turn “On” the 110-volt engine room exhaust fan. The switch for this is one of the household types on the electrical cabinet.
CAVEAT: After starting the gen. set allow it to run 5 minutes before any load (other than lights) is put on it. If you fail to do this it will overheat.
 Check the water on the starboard side. Use the engine room water hose to fill.
 Check oil on portside by opening the Velcro closure. The dipstick is low on the side. It is a screw in type.
 To add oil, open the Velcro closure on the aft end of gen. set-Use the two strings hanging from overhead to hold the closure up. The large cap at the top is where oil is added. ( pour slowly)
 Oil is stored on portside of engine room in a milk crate.
 Starter switch is on overhead panel, there is no glow plug.
To STOP the gen. set, hold the kill switch down until the engine comes to a complete stop*** Then turn the key off.****

The fuel filter is located on the forward port bulkhead in the engine room. Extra filters are in engine room port side aft.
To change the filters:
 Turn valve to the filter off on the fuel manifold.
 Use the fuel filter change bucket to catch the fuel & filter.
 Place new filter and then open valve at manifold.
 Use the pump on top of the filter to fill the bowl but first use a wrench to crack the nut on the outlet fitting side of the filter to allow air to escape.
 When only fuel is coming out, retighten fitting. The engine will start without further bleeding.
 This is the only filter for the gen. set.
3- FUEL
SEE DIAGRAM OF FUEL TANK SYSTEM
Usually draw fuel from one port and one starboard tank simultaneously to maintain trim.*** Make sure that the fuel is being returned to the tank from which it came.***
Fuel Valves To the engines are located as follows:
Port forward tank- (130 gallons)- The valve is on the forward end of tank toward the front of the engine. The fuel return valve is above it.
Port aft tank- (130 gallons)- The valve is on the forward end of the tank; just aft of the engine. The fuel return valve is above it.
GAUGING PORT TANKS – Use the aluminum stick stored behind ladder to bridge. Hash marks are defined on list posted on window behind the ladder.
Starboard forward tank- (154 gallons)- CAVEAT: This side is different from port side.
The forward tank is split into two but empty and fill as ONE.
The fuel valve TO the engine is at the aft end of the tank just aft of the engine. The return valve is at the forward end of the tank just forward of the engine
Note the Fuel Site Gauge on this tank. For this gauge to read the amount of fuel in the tank TWO valves must be open; the Gate valve and the ¼ turn valve, both at the bottom of the tank.

Starboard Aft Tank- (92 gallons)- The fuel valve TO the engine is located at the forward end of the tank just aft of the engine. The return is on TOP of the tank. CAVEAT: The valve for the top of the SIGHT GAUGE is right next to it.
For the SIGHT GAUGE to read the amount of fuel, the valves at the top & bottom of the sight gauge MUST BE OPEN (two valves on the top and two valves on the bottom.)
FUELING
BEFORE FUELING: Get the following:

 Roll of paper towels
 One oil spill pad stored on the starboard side aft in engine room.
 Squirt bottle of Dawn with other fueling supplies
Stuff paper towels in the scupper next to the fuel fill being used.
FUEL FILTER CHANGE –MAIN ENGINES
There is an ELECTRIC FUEL PUMP that may be used to bleed air from the fuel system.

To change filters on the Perkins:
 Turn all valves on the fuel manifold off
 Get the fuel filter change plastic bucket from on top of the starboard forward fuel tank, place this under the filter housing
 An oil filter wrench is in the Sears toolbox, use this to twist off-(to the left) the filter housing. (Only the 2 black filter housings are filters, the 2 smaller ones are water separators and need not be serviced).
 Allow the fuel and element to go into the bucket
 Wipe the inside of the housing
 Place a new element in it and fill with diesel fuel from the gallon jug in front of the port engine
CAVEAT: FUEL WILL SPILL when twisting the housing back on. Make certain that the bucket is in place.
 Repeat for each engine
TO ASSURE THAT NO AIR IS IN SYSTEM:
 Open a valve on the bottom of the manifold to ONE of the filters
 Open the Right Hand valve on the top of the manifold
 Put the end of the clear plastic tube that is attached to the top of the manifold in the fuel bucket
 Go to the electric fuel pump on the bulkhead:
*This pump is isolated from fuel flow by a 2-way valve in front of it and a ¼ turn valve after it. There are 2 switches to control it. Both are on the overhead just inboard and forward of the Port engine. One is a momentary switch that may be used for bleeding or priming and the other is an ON/OFF switch as this pump is rated for continuous duty. This pump may be used in an emergency or if a fuel pump fails. This pump may also be used to bleed the rest of the fuel system to the engine. See Volume Five Perkins Shop Manual for Engine Bleeding Method. Then proceed as follows:

*REFER TO PHOTO OF ELECTRIC PUMP
Turn the two- way valve A to the left (this allows fuel to the pump)
Open the ¼ turn valve B
Make sure the plastic tube is in the bucket (hold it in) Open the valve to the plastic tube
On the ceiling & front of the port engine there is a toggle switch, hold it “on” and the electric pump runs
Operate the electric pump until no bubbles from the plastic tube are emitted Repeat for the other filter
Close the valve to the plastic tube
Tape the plastic tube back in to place so it does not spill fuel, once purging is complete
Isolate electric fuel pump by turning valves A & B back to the original positions
 Open both valves on top of the manifold- Open all 3 valves on the bottom of the manifold
4- WATER
There are 3 tanks each holding 125 gallons. The engine room has two, one each side aft of the fuel tanks.
Each tank has a deck fill. The aft tanks deck fills are the first ones from the transom. The forward tanks deck full is forward on the starboard side. (There are brass placards on the side of the cabin)
To maintain proper trim of the vessel use both tanks at the same time.
Valves for each are located at the base of each tank.
There is a valve near the base of the Fresh Water Pump that will isolate BOTH of the tanks. The Fresh Water Pump is located on the starboard forward portion of the engine room.
The third water tank is forward of the engine room and is accessed through the hatch in the hallway. The valve for this tank is located below the fresh eater pump and is just forward of the valve controlling the aft water tanks.
NOTE: There is a complete replacement pump stored in the engine room starboard aft along with many misc. parts.
There is a sight gauge on the starboard aft water tank: to operate, open the valve on it.

5- REFRIGERATION
Is 12 volt, 120 volt and Gas. The full size Norcold and the freezer runs on all 3.
 NORCOLD FULL SIZE REFRIGERATOR (Detailed instructions for this unit are in Volume 3 on the chart table)
To operate the “12-volt Refrigerator breaker” must be “ON”, no matter which energy source is used, gas 12 v or 120v. It is preferable to use Gas when underway or at anchor.
To Use Gas:
 Turn 12 volt refrigerator breaker “On”
 Put a gas bottle online, they are located on the aft deck under the ladder. Turn one tank on & then the valve on the “T” that allows gas from that tank to flow.
 There is also a VALVE on the STACK of VALVES near the tank that is labeled Refrigerator(the TOP one), this must be open.
 Select GAS on the refrigerator door. OR
To Use 120-volt
 Select 120 volt on the refrigerator door. (When running on 120-volt or 12-volt it is NOT necessary to close the gas valves.)
 In addition to the 12 volt breaker the 120 volt Refrigerator breaker must also be on.
CAVEAT: Do not use 12 volt when starboard engine is not operating. 12 volt will NOT maintain cold for more than 3 hours even when starboard engine is running.
On the #2 panel turn the Refrigerator Exhaust Fan on. Also turn ON the RED switch beside that panel. That is another exhaust fan for the refrigerator. Both are 12 volt.
DONOT USE 12V FANS WHEN ENGINE IS OFF.
There is a 110-volt exhaust fan. It must be plugged into the receptacle inside the electrical cabinet. It is a plug that is hanging right next to the receptacle.

DOMETIC FREEZER (Volume 3)
This unit operates on 12 volt; 120 volt or Gas.
Starting from ambient temperature it is best to run it overnight on gas or 120 volt then place frozen food in it.
CAVEAT: USE ONLY ONE SOURCE OF FUEL AT A TIME.
 120 Volt Operation- The freezer circuit breaker on main panel must be “On”
Just forward of the freezer on the sidewall are 2 switches. Turn the 120-volt “on” (Make sure the 12 volt is “Off”
 12 Volt Operation-The 12 volt freezer switch in the #2 electric panel must be “ON’, the 12 volt switch on the side wall just forward of the freezer must be “On” (Make sure the 120 volt is “OFF”
GAS OPERATION:
CAVEAT: Make sure BOTH the 12-volt & 120 volt switches just forward of the freezer are “OFF”.
Establish Gas flow from the tanks by:
Open valve on tank
Open valve on the “t” that controls that tank
Open the valve just forward of the starboard tank on the bulkhead that is labeled “Freezer”
To START follow instructions on the Dometic in Volume ____ on the chart table.
Basically hold the Pilot Button down and repeatedly push the start button until the pilot ignites. It can be seen from the TOP vent, outboard side or when heat is felt coming from the vent.
Note there is an emergency supply of propane in side the console on the bridge.
6- MAIN ENGINE STARTING
1. On the main circuit breaker panel turn “On” the Overhead Console breaker.
2. On the overhead console turn “Off” the switch “Alarm”. It is between the two windshield wiper switches.
3. Make sure that the Battery Charger is “Off”
4. Turn the ignition key to “Heat” for 15 seconds and then start.
5. Turn the “alarm” switch back on.
6. Make certain water is discharging from exhaust.

PRIOR TO LEAVING DOCK
1. Raise Mast
CAVEAT: DO NOT use Radar unless mast is raised
2. Alarms:
Bilge alarm “On”
Co alarm “On”
Gas alarm “On”
3. The Bridge Depth Finder is on the #3 12V panel. The “ON” switch for it is the toggle switch to the immediate LEFT of the Stbd. GPS at the helm.
7-TOOLS
There is a basic set of standard tools in the salon in a drawer in the side board.
The main tool Box is a Sears box in the engine room forward of the Port engine.
Heavy tools, pipe wrenches, pullers, cheater bars and the like are in the compartment UNDER the Sears box.
Aft of the Gen Set, under the parts bin is al aluminum Tool Box with a ½ inch socket set.
In the same place and behind that box is a box with COPPER TUBING TOOLS.
Port side in front on the fuel tank is a milk crate with an assortment of POWER TOOLS
Electrical Tools and Parts are in the Pilothouse under the berth on the port side.
Vise and anvil are just aft of Gen Set.
Manual fuel transfer pump
Manuel bilge pump
8- SPARE PARTS
See Vol #--- Spare Parts for exact location
Most are stored aft in the engine room balance under bed in master state room..
Electrical-most are in the electrical toolbox in the pilothouse under the berth. Includes connectors, bulbs and meters.
Circulating water pump for Perkins
Repair kits and impellers for Perkins
Fan belts for Perkins (under Sears tool Box)
Repair kit for Perkins fuel pump
Impellers for Volvo diesel
There are plastic pans and baskets with an assortment of misc. parts.
Parts for the head, A/C units
Fresh water Pump (complete pump)
Hose clamps of all sizes
Spare hose for all applications

Gasket Material
14 bins of SS nuts, bolts, screws and parts
Wide assortment of electric wire
Bilge pumps 7 float switches
In Pilot house there is an assortment of glue, silicone, tape, gasket sealer wire ties, etc under the berth starboard side.
FILTERS – For oil and fuel are located in the engine room, port side aft.
Oil, Power Steering Fluid, Fuel Additive, Anti-Freeze, Nalcool, etc are aft of starboard engine. There are funnels and a measuring cup.
Alternator- Instructions for mounting in Perkins binder
See Perkins “pan” for more parts
Cutlass bearing parts
Zincs
JABSCO head parts- motor and small parts ;hand pump for it
Solenoid for shutdown on Perkins or Gen Set
Solenoid switch “Ford style”, for Perkins starter and preheater.
9- SEWER SYSTEM

The Jabsco head is plumbed to a “Y” valve that is accessed through the hatch in the hall outside the head compartment.
This valve is ordinarily set to direct the effluent to the holding tank that is located under the fwd. Stateroom sole. This is accessed through a hatch just aft. The bed.
There is a MACERATOR pump mounted on the bulkhead in front of the tank.
The deck fitting for pump out is located on the Stbd. Fwd. Deck.
Note: there are numerous parts and repair kits for the head. including a new motor. There is also a new macerator pump.
In the unlikely event the head clogs try the “plumbers friend” that is in the cabinet.
10- LAZARETTE
Fuel transfer hose (white-actually stained brown)
Garden hose (for potable water)
Fender boards (2 sets)
Dock lines
Misc. lines
Anchors; 16 # Danforth; Storm, with rodes
Scuba tanks (scuba gear is under hatch in hallway)
Flopper stoppers
Chaffing gear
Snatch block to raise dinghy
Chains & shackles
Fenders
Tiller, emergency
200’ polypropylene line
Complete anchor rode
11- EMERGENCY GEAR
4” plastic pipe with emergency gear Pilot House
SOS flashlight
Float Light (cockpit)
PFD’s on bridge (deck box and under seats)
Life Raft
Solar still, Pilot House electric cabinet
Flare Pistol, Pilot House electric cabinet with flares
Flares, behind chairs starboard side salon (large box)
Dive Light, large, Pilot House
12- Bilge Pumps
There are three Bilge pumps.
The main one is under the center floorboand forward of the engines and has a float switch. It operates even with the bilge pump switch on the main panel in the “Off” position.
There is one under the forward stateroom but it discharges into the engine room bilge. It does NOT have a float switch.
The EMERGENCY pump is the large JABSCO forward of the engines. It is controlled SOLELY by its float switch. If it goes on the ALARM also sounds, it is a BELL located in the elec. Cabinet.
13- STOVE
This is gas.
Caveat: Make certain the left most knob on the stove is in the “ Pilot Off’ position unless the oven is being used. This is very important so that there is no chance of gas escaping.
There is no separate valve to turn the gas off to just the stove. There are such valves for all other gas appliances.
Sept. 2002
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Old 10-08-2013, 08:19 PM   #34
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Holy smokes, Charles! That's great! That is exactly what I'm seeking to accomplish in providing a 'How to' with useful tips so someone with general boating knowledge can take over and operate the boat safely and confidently without me.

I really appreciate you posting this. I like the fact that it's only 12 pages - enough information to be useful but not so much as to become overwhelming.

Thanks for the Grade A post!
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Old 10-09-2013, 02:41 PM   #35
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FlyWright,
Thanks for the kind words. Everyone should have such a manual one never knows when an emergency will occur. Even if one does not venture far from home as we did, something can happen to the captain, then what?
An Operation Manual is cheap, real cheap, insurance that not only your boat gets home but your family and friends.

CCC
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Old 10-09-2013, 06:39 PM   #36
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Most days I have to produce a report (using Word) with 2 to 3 dozen cropped, re-sized, and annotated photos. I have found IrfanView (my default jpeg viewer) to be the quickest for cropping and resizing. I then use Photoscape to insert text, lines, arrows and boxes. Once you have initially set up your preferred font, color, shadow, etc, it is the speediest I have found. You could also use Photoscape for the cropping and re-sizing but I find IrfanView much simpler for those tasks. Both are freeware. Both are capable of much more, but the extra stuff doesn't get in the way of the simpler tasks I use everyday.

The following took maybe 90 seconds to re-size and add the text and arrows.
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:30 PM   #37
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*******High jack alert*******
Tonic, is the PT42 basically a PT35 stretched with a cockpit? If so I have never seen one before.

*************************

Sorry folks, we now return you to your previous posting on a pretty cool and original topic
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Old 10-09-2013, 08:40 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CPseudonym View Post
*******High jack alert*******
Tonic, is the PT42 basically a PT35 stretched with a cockpit? If so I have never seen one before.

*************************

Sorry folks, we now return you to your previous posting on a pretty cool and original topic
Actually, it's a PT38 Sundeck with a cockpit.
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