Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-09-2013, 11:13 AM   #41
Senior Member
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: NONE
Vessel Model: NONE
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 435
Boatpoker, I can absolutely confirm some are made of scraps of solid teak and very thick teak at that, they appeared to be 3/4 inch. Two MT's (1984 32ft flush deck & 1985 40+ft?) I have seen personally and one Albin owner here on TF reported same. I don't recall if there were plywood scraps mixed in with the teak, but in any event I suppose they would also be well protected due to this unusual method of construction.
__________________
Advertisement

Capt Kangeroo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2013, 06:02 PM   #42
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,568
seattleboatguy, any of this helping?
Eric, I thought you accidentally posted on the wrong thread, but can`t find another yours fits.
__________________

__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2013, 08:28 PM   #43
Senior Member
 
City: Norfolk, VA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Bells
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 38
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
seattleboatguy, any of this helping?
Hi BruceK. I have found the replies to all my recent posts very informative, including this one. My inclination for a no-teak deck was reinforced by what I read here. I've also enjoyed reading other threads from other members. All of this is sort of a Trawler 101 course for me so I won't be completely clueless when the day comes that I start shopping for a way to transition from a sailing slob to a trawler slob. But, I've got to tell you, one of the things I enjoy most about this forum is looking at the pictures of the boats belonging to the various contributors. There are some REALLY nice trawlers amongst ye.
seattleboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2013, 08:46 PM   #44
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 10,179
We've all been there, SBG! Welcome to the party!
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 08:20 AM   #45
Senior Member
 
Lobstah's Avatar
 
City: Dunedin, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: T/T Whistful
Vessel Model: Boat US 12' Inflatable
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 220
We purchased our first trawler in 1994, a 34ft aft cabin Marine Trader, and yes, she had teak decks. We "thought" we maintained them properly for the 8yrs we had the boat. Never noticed any leaks from down below decks.
A year after we sold the boat, the new owners came to the boat one weekend and discovered a bilge full of diesel fuel. One of the black iron fuel tanks had become corroded to the point that it finally gave out. Because of the way the tanks were mounted, pretty much impossible to inspect the bottom of the tanks, at least the outside of the tanks. On Marine Traders, as with most trawlers, the engine and tankage was all installed prior to putting the "house" on. The new owners ended up going with smaller plastic tanks.

We loved the decks, but when we soon begin searching for our next boat, I highly doubt it will have teak decks.

Jim
Lobstah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 10:07 AM   #46
Guru
 
City: somewhere
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,356
No teak for me, anywhere outside.
__________________
Life is a Beach
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 12:30 PM   #47
TF Site Team
 
Baker's Avatar
 
City: League City, Tx
Country: Texas
Vessel Model: Carver 356
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,630
No teak for me....anywhere on the outside of the boat. I owned a Cape Dory sailboat and that cured me very quickly!!!
__________________
Prairie 29...Perkins 4236...Sold
Mainship Pilot 30...Yanmar 4LHA-STP...Sold
Carver 356...T-Cummins 330B
Baker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 12:58 PM   #48
Guru
 
City: Fort Myers
Country: USA
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 956
Great information in this tread, we have copious amounts of teak trim which I don't mind keeping up, the teak cockpit is over open support beams so damage from leaking to sub-decking is not there. But looking at trawlers in the 80's plus period the OP is correct a lot of complete bow to stern teak decking, which I too would not want, or at least would budget in converting over to FB. I will say, nice teak deck with bare feet feels right, but it comes with a price.
Marlinmike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 01:04 PM   #49
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 7,979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baker View Post
No teak for me....anywhere on the outside of the boat. I owned a Cape Dory sailboat and that cured me very quickly!!!
Preferably, No Wood of any sort for me anywhere outside of or in the hull of a boat, i.e. stringers or transom or keel or bow stem/sprit... etc. That said... there are two side-sliders on our Tolly that have some wood in their construction as well as their frames. Also there is horizontal wood spacer along each side of fly bridge for attachment to salon top as well as wood cabinet doors on bridge. Kept in covered berth that amount of wood presents little problem.

Depending on condition of a boat, and for what reason I might purchase, certain amounts of wood would not be a kill-all on the deal as long as the wood was in near perfect condition to begin with or needed little to no restoration.

My many early years of refinishing/restoring/repairing/maintaining all sorts of wood boats in NY and Maine cured me of the need for wood on any of my own boats! Well founded FRP with good gel coat is my choice for ease of ownership that leaves lots o time for cruising, gunk-holen, swimming, imbibing, BBQing... and other delightful forms of marine life boat-play!
Art is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 04:27 PM   #50
Senior Member
 
Lobstah's Avatar
 
City: Dunedin, Fl
Country: USA
Vessel Name: T/T Whistful
Vessel Model: Boat US 12' Inflatable
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 220
We loved the teak rails, trim, and especially the interior, which was all teak. And all of the Marine Traders had personal touches from the families that did the teak work, either a special carving on a bulkhead, or on the wine cabinet, etc.

But...all that interior was easily taken care of with some pledge and a rag.



Not so with decking. I have no idea what it costs to rip it up and replace it, but I will be factoring that into our next boat for sure, because that's the same era we're looking at, and as was mentioned above, most of those boats had teak decks.

Jim
Lobstah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 04:31 PM   #51
Senior Member
 
aronhk_md's Avatar
 
City: New Castle, Delaware
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Belladonna
Vessel Model: Monark 58 custom
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 132
My experience with teak decks on 70's to 80's marine traders and other imported trawlers is that the decks leak, whether you see it or not. Someone here counted 900 plus fasteners on their boat...to me it seemed like thousands. lol If you see water damage, its extensive and goes far beyond the area of damage to the interior you can visualize. The decks were often just wood of some sort and not encapsulated in a resin, but covered in a layer of fiberglass. I helped a friend pull up a teak deck on a 1979 marine trader 42, and it was a mess.

The teak and deck itself took several days of work to rip up. Doesn't look like a huge area, but it isn't easy. A lot of deck wood had to be replaced. We erected huge tarps to let the decent wood dry out over the winter. If it had been indoors that would have been easier. Then in the spring we replaced the bad wood, used a penetrating epoxy (git rot?) in questionable areas, and then laid down new glass over the decks.

During this process the bottom layer of glass (there was one in most areas) was left in place. It had been a sandwiched core. I forget now what we used to finish the decks after the glass mat, but it wasn't a gel coat. Like someone elses pictures here it had sand mixed in for a rougher finish in the walk areas.

All told I think supplies were around $4000 and it took us (2 men) about 2 full weeks (not all at once of course). Its the labor costs that kill. Don't want to do it again, but if I were retired, and nothing else to do I might.
aronhk_md is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2013, 05:37 PM   #52
Member
 
City: Chicago
Country: usa
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 8
New member here, can someone clarify what method a 1985 45' Sea Ranger teak deck install would be ? The above post would suggest that I should know before I get involved ? Thanks
mpgjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2013, 06:17 PM   #53
Guru
 
boatpoker's Avatar
 
City: Port Credit
Country: Ontario
Vessel Name: DIRT FREE
Vessel Model: Benford Fantail 38
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 2,011
Quote:
Originally Posted by mpgjr View Post
New member here, can someone clarify what method a 1985 45' Sea Ranger teak deck install would be ? The above post would suggest that I should know before I get involved ? Thanks
Screwed and plugged, take that as you will
boatpoker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2013, 07:15 PM   #54
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,568
Quote:
Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
Screwed and plugged, take that as you will
Boatpoker puts it well. A thousand screws and plugs!
Scanning the thread, most of the issues are well covered, if a fellow owner responds you may get more specific advice, even then construction can vary boat to boat within a brand. The big issues are what`s under the planking, and the extent of water damage.
It`s much cheaper and faster to go with a painted non slip finish over 2 fresh layers of fibreglass, on a prepared surface. Much of the cost of fresh teak (over 1 layer of f/g) is in laying it by gluing rather than screwing, which was fast, cheap, and sure to give trouble later.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2013, 05:57 AM   #55
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,525
A teak trivet next to the range , to hold a hot pot, is all the endangered forest I need on board.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 08:11 PM   #56
Guru
 
brian eiland's Avatar
 
City: St Augustine, FL
Country: USA & Thailand
Vessel Name: RunningTide
Vessel Model: 37 Louisiane catamaran
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 890
Albin 43 with teak decks

I've seen quite a number of references to a fair number of these older trawlers with teak decks as having water penetration into the core materials of the deck.

Would an Albin 43 be likely guilty of this??
brian eiland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 08:38 PM   #57
Member
 
City: Chicago
Country: usa
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 8
mpgjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 08:40 PM   #58
Member
 
City: Chicago
Country: usa
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 8
Does this teak , in any ones humble opinion , appear to be at the "the teak tells you when it's going bad " stage ? Thanks for any help
mpgjr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:21 AM   #59
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,525
>the core materials of the deck. < What core material???

A cored deck is created with GRP on both sides , and the core keeps the sides in place like the web of an I beam.

Only the Chinese boat sellers claimed that house plywood with a single layer of GRP was a composite construction .

AS the plywood was of questionable quality , to me the solution is to ignore it , grind smooth whatever is left after stripping the teak overlay , lay down GRP in epoxy and bond in a layer of REAL CORE material, then lay up a top layer of GRP in polly and add non skid as required.

Same numbers of GRP laminate , just split with the core , FAR stiffer than just GRP and stiffness is required for the deck not to flex and crack .
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 07:30 AM   #60
Guru
 
Keith's Avatar
 
Vessel Name: Anastasia III
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,716
I bought a 1986 Krogen 42 in 2001 with teak decks. Yea, I could spend tons of time and money babying it, but I don't. About once a year I replace maybe 100 screws and plugs because in all those years, the deck has worn down such that the plugs have become paper thin and depart on their own. The few leaks that have occurred I have fixed either by re-doing the caulking with TDS caulk, or if I'm lazy, flowable silicone. Either works. I'm sure I have some rotting underneath but hey... nobody has fallen through. I've thought of just sanding the deck with a belt sander, sealing with CPES then applying one of the synthetic deck materials down to it, but that's not a priority.
__________________

Keith is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:53 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012