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Old 11-08-2013, 11:51 AM   #21
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Teak decks on a 30+ year old boat of unknown care and pedigree seems a big risk. I've owned and maintained one that was boat house kept, the only way to go IMHO if you're going to be a teak deck lover. Our vessel, like Rochepoint's is in a wet area - Sidney BC. It is completely water proof, outdoors, has great views and with only a varnished cap rail to agonize over, that is enough for me.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:27 PM   #22
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I love the teak decks, cap rails and trim. I stay in covered moorage for that reason. It's an expensive passion, but it sure looks nice.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:43 PM   #23
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Lets say you were shopping for a 40' trawler, late 1970s or early 1980s, and you found one you liked. If it had teak decks that appeared to be in good condition, would the teak decks be a deal-breaker for you? Does your current boat have teak decks?
No my current boat does not.

Interesting question though as when boat shopping we loved boats with teak decks and had a GB36 under contract briefly. We seriously looked at perhaps 10 boats with teak decks. Ultimately teak decks was the deal breaker in every one of the boats we looked at as they appeared in good shape at first blush only to give up their secrets upon further examination.

Our next boat will be perhaps similar age/size range you are looking for but will be skeptical of the deck condition the minute we board rather than impressed with them as we where this time. I like Mark's suggestion of rather than a "deal breaker" we will assign negative points when considering them due to possible leak issues. Glue down decks like Bruce upgraded his boat to would be ideal but they are not common in that era boat.
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:46 PM   #24
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Thanks, more photos on the boats website at http://www.rochepoint.ca/...
Really nice! TY!!
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Old 11-08-2013, 01:47 PM   #25
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I like teak decks but when the time comes to redo my decks, I think I will have them removed. I just can't see paying over $40k to have new teak decks installed on an older vessel. But if I was ordering a new boat, it will definitely have teak decks (glued on).

Teak decks in good condition on an older boat will not be a deal breaker for me.
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Old 11-08-2013, 03:04 PM   #26
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Would I buy a boat w teak decks?

Of course ............. If it was a wood boat like a GB woodie. All you'd ever need to do is caulk the seams. But since nothing likes to stick to teak that may not be as easy as caulking other materials. I think "Life Caulk" is especially formulated for teak.

If one pulled up the teak and FG/epoxy'd the decks sealing all the old holes a new deck could be put in place w an appropriate bedding compound. Dolfinite may have too little adhesion and 291 SikaFlex probably has too much.
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Old 11-08-2013, 03:35 PM   #27
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Way I see it!

"Pleasure" boats are for just as their name implies! - PLEASURE!

So, and although I do appreciate some work efforts on my boat(s) as a way for personal fulfillment/enjoyment, I like to keep the “pleasure use” as compared to “work effort” ratio allotted to somewhere around a 75 to 1 basis. In other words... 75 days play to one day work (75 hrs to 1 hr, not too bad!). Therefore I only purchase boats that can provide me my desired ratio!

That said... I do most work on my own vessels. But of course, if I hired all boat-work out – then my ratio would be 100% pleasure-boat-play-time no matter how much work required!

Just like swimming – different strokes for different folks!
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Old 11-08-2013, 03:57 PM   #28
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Its a hard question to answer because not all boats are created equal. For example, and with regard to damage caused by leaks only, many marine traders and apparently some Albins (& probably others) have deck cores made of large solid teak scraps embedded in very thick resin, then they screw down the teak over this. Essentially they put down a teak deck over a very thick reinforced fiberglass deck. Whether this was a strategic design or not, the net effect of this construction is that the teak can leak like a sieve yet cause no damage below it. I suppose it could effect a piece of the embedded teak directly under a leak but as these embedded pieces are separated by pure resin, only that small piece would ever be effected.

A good friend has an MT constructed this way and although his teak decks are a wreck & nearly every piece of wood on his boat needs attention, his decks are as solid as a rock. Another MT I am intimately aware of has had its teak decks insanely pressure washered until there was nearly nothing left yet the boat interior remains dry and damage free.

I hate wood on "my boats" but in no way would I call it an automatic deal breaker if I was shopping....... it all depends.
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Old 11-08-2013, 04:12 PM   #29
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Bay Pelican, a Krogen 42, had teak decks in 1999 when I purchased her. Leaked like crazy. Price then to repair leaks was slightly less than removing teak an replacing with fiberglass. Did that and never regretted it. Question of the value of the boat versus the price you are paying including the cost to remove decks if that is your choice.

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Old 11-08-2013, 04:35 PM   #30
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Our next boat will be perhaps similar age/size range you are looking for but will be skeptical of the deck condition the minute we board rather than impressed with them as we where this time.
Can you elaborate on how you would do your teak deck inspection? Do you need to be pretty experienced with teak decks to have a high enough skill level to do this inspection?
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:02 PM   #31
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Can you elaborate on how you would do your teak deck inspection? Do you need to be pretty experienced with teak decks to have a high enough skill level to do this inspection?
I'm far from an old hand at this and would not feel comfortable guiding anyone. Suffice it to say the specific boats we looked at had a wow factor to the decks until you scrutinized what was under them. Water stains below gave the first indication to look closer above. Then the dreaded soft spots on deck where found.

Without painting the subject with too broad a brush all boats can sell for a price point. Decks like Mike's boathouse kept in post #2 are my dream as I use a boathouse too. Gigatoni is another member whom knows exactly how to take care of teak. However not all boats are treated with that much love and care. Pity considering the cost to refurb them is steep.

I will have a teak deck someday but it is going to be an item well scrutinized by an experienced pro before hand.
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Old 11-08-2013, 05:45 PM   #32
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I knew my foredeck had soft spots before buying the boat. It was fg over balsa core, and obviously several areas of balsa had rotted. There was fg under the balsa also, but no leaks as this fg had no screw holes in it.

Estimate to repair were $10-15,000, so I factored that in and went ahead. I removed all of the deck hardware and teak. There were 960 fasteners for a deck area of approx. 92 sq ft.

Then the yard cut off the the top fg layer in sections, laid new core and reglassed over the top, and refitted the deck hardware. Finish was non-slip awlgrip. I love teak, but to glue down a teak deck was expensive. Also, teak gets very hot in sunny climates, too hot to walk on uncovered teak in bare feet. I still have teak side decks and aft deck, and these are largely covered so bare feet is fine.

The yard's cost was $18,000. So, it costs but is by no means a deal-breaker. If soft spots are known then you might get quite a discount on purchase price, as most potential buyers are scared away.

During my repair we found about 90% of the balsa was wet or rotten. It did take 30 years to get that way, and clearly the boat caulking had been allowed to degrade at some point to get the rot started. The PO had tried patch up jobs a number of times, achieving little benefit. I suspecgt he may well have spent as much as I did, but achieved little benefit. Removal of the balsa, recore and reglassing is the way to fix it once and for all.

My boat deck was fg over balsa also, painted with non slip. Where stauchions were fitted the screw holes leaked - the balsa had not been cored and prepared for fasteners.

Some pics of foredeck during and after repair, and boat deck with rotten balsa (black) surrounded by wet balsa. Although I replaced the entire foredeck, for the boat deck we just chased the wet areas out.
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:24 PM   #33
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Seattleboatguy, check just what is under the teak planking. Mine,totally unexpected, was foam sandwich,not teak block sandwich. Except for 2 small teak squares at a step point,which were soft, damp and black.
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Old 11-08-2013, 06:41 PM   #34
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Are you guys positive you are seeing teak blocks as core material ?
I have seen 18-20 Taiwan trawler decks opened up and all I have seen are approximately 4" squares of low grade plywood and none of it was in good enough shape to identify.
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Old 11-08-2013, 08:05 PM   #35
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I knew my foredeck had soft spots before buying the boat. ...
Congratulations for saving the boat.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:28 PM   #36
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I think you need to be very aware of the costs. In our area covered moorage is a $250/mo premium and I am on the only dock with covered in our size. It can be hard to find. I moved our boat under cover mostly as insurance against what I know is coming. A lot of work and expense. I have three areas of teak deck. The flybridge is in the worst shape and needs to be dealt with first. The foredeck and side decks are in good shape but take the most abuse from wash downs, etc and with the fuel fills are my secondary concerns because of the potential expense of fuel tank replacement. My aft deck is under the Europa fly bridge extension and therefore has faired the best. It is where fish guts and parties get the heaviest use so it is also a concern.

With all that said, I love them. My feet and my kids feet love them. They are never slick, they are generally cool, and most people love the look. Good luck!
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:22 PM   #37
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boatpoker, my foam core seems to be an IG exception, I`m fairly sure AndyG`s IG36 had teak blocks and he removed them. But IGs were built in PRC not Taiwan, finished in HK and exported, mostly to OZ.
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Old 11-09-2013, 02:27 AM   #38
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I love the look of teak decks but don't have any on my boat.

I have plenty of wooodwork inside, and the small amount of exterior woodwork (cockpit door and window frame) is painted.

Nice & easy to care for, but I am toying with the idea of laying teak planking in my small cockpit. It has a few holes drilled in it from past table mounts etc, and needs extra sound insulation, so I thought a layer of teak would assist in both issues. If I do it, I would glue the teak down with a few screws from underneath rather than above, so plugging would not be required.
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Old 11-09-2013, 03:07 AM   #39
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\..... If I do it, I would glue the teak down with a few screws from underneath rather than above, so plugging would not be required.
Screw holes and bungs on top are seldom the cause of problems. Its the caulking between the teak strips that fails. It would let water get to your screws/screw holes even if put in from underneath.

I understand that to caulk properly you need to put non-stick tape in the bottom of the groove. Then the caulking just sticks to both sides and not the bottom, and can tolerate some movement without pulling away. If it is stuck to the bottom of the groove then any movement tears the caulking away from one side or the other.
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Old 11-09-2013, 10:40 AM   #40
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I love the look of teak decks but don't have any on my boat.

I have plenty of wooodwork inside, and the small amount of exterior woodwork (cockpit door and window frame) is painted.

Nice & easy to care for, but I am toying with the idea of laying teak planking in my small cockpit. It has a few holes drilled in it from past table mounts etc, and needs extra sound insulation, so I thought a layer of teak would assist in both issues. If I do it, I would glue the teak down with a few screws from underneath rather than above, so plugging would not be required.
Irrespective of its need for care... On another slant regarding teak (or anything of weight)...

Every hull design and size boat has an optimum weight as well as optimum distribution areas aboard said boat of the individual items that comprise its total weight.

Therefore, I remark:

To add extra weight that any boat was not originally designed for (engineered to correctly accommodate) that weight may become problematic in the grand scheme of the originally engineered plans that rule a boat’s “living” composition.

Not all, but most, boats have considerable marine engineering aback their design and weight ratios/placements. I’ve found that interfering too much with the educated marine engineer’s initial weight-ratio-placement considerations can develop problems under certain sea conditions.

Weight placements/additions aboard any boat should receive close scrutiny as to developed effects the “new” extra-weight may provide.

Smaller the boat... more easy it is to override the boat’s originally engineered hull-plans with even minor additions/placements of weight.

Jus sayen!

Happy Boating Daze! - Art
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