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Old 04-01-2011, 05:29 AM   #21
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

Quote:
"*I've heard that a salt water*boat going to fresh water can show rot below water line very quickly."

I would rather have a wood boat that has only been in fresh water.

Less corrosion on the thousands of fasteners that hold her together.

Wood boats like most boats deteriorate from the top down.** JohnP<a></a>*
*

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Old 04-02-2011, 04:59 AM   #22
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

John P
I beg to differ.
Wooden boats are better in SW.
Fresh is what promotes rot.
If in fresh always throw a couple of handfulls of salt in the bilge to keep it good.
Benn
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Old 04-02-2011, 07:11 AM   #23
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

Quote:
Tidahapah wrote:
John P
I beg to differ.
Wooden boats are better in SW.
Fresh is what promotes rot.
If in fresh always throw a couple of handfulls of salt in the bilge to keep it good.
Benn
I tend to agree with Benn. Fresh water is a wooden boat's enemy. We always used to throw* a batch of rock salt in the bilges on lay up each year. And John P is correct that they deteriorate from the top down.

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Old 04-02-2011, 08:51 AM   #24
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A wood hull for three years?

It's interesting to me that no one has mentioned the "worms" that infest a salt water wooden boat. Many years ago, in Seattle, owners of wooden ships used to bring them to Lake Union & Lake Washington for a period of time. The reason? To kill the worms that were in the hull. Copper cladding the bottoms of these old boats was done to retard marine growth* (electrolysis created by salt water & copper) but it* also retarded any infestations of "worms."


http://www.shelltrips.com/articles/shipworm/index.html






-- Edited by SeaHorse II on Saturday 2nd of April 2011 09:52:43 AM
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Old 04-02-2011, 09:45 AM   #25
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A wood hull for three years?

Wood boats are better in salt water no doubt about it in my opinion but John P has a very good point about fasteners. What do they put in food to keep it from rotting (spoiling) salt! They say Douglas Fir almost never rots in salt water but goes like other woods in fresh. Another problem w wood boats is that they work. They are an assemblage of small parts screwed, nailed and bolted together. the parts are made of wood that is not dimensionally stable. The wood expans and contracts. When a boat quarters in a sea the waves tend to twist the hull*** ...back and forth*** ..this way and that. It's a wonder they stay together as long as they do. When you see a boat that's been sister ribed more than once, refastened, mostly replanked and w extensive keel repairs w wood of a different species than original walk away as though you've been to a funeral*** ..because you have. But don't volunteer to burry the cadaver. Like Art I love wood boats but 98% of wood boats available today are OLD wood boats. At my age I'd buy a new wood boat in a flash but a 40 year lid** ...almost never. It's a bit like buying a steel car that never got painted. Having said the above I was temped to buy a wood boat and sell it in 10 years for whatever mostly out of frustration because most of the boats I wanted were old wood boats. I'll edit and post a link to one I was lusting over.

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...&access=Public

This is a real trawler guys. 1.5 gph, 1250rpm cruise, 5' draft, canoe stern ect ect. But you can't buy one anything like this in plastic or anything else except with a new custom build. The only way for an average guy like me to own something like this is to buy an old wood boat. And that my friends could be justafication for buying an old wood boat.

*


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Saturday 2nd of April 2011 09:57:12 AM
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Old 04-02-2011, 02:04 PM   #26
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

A wood boat in good condition has no bottom leaks.* The bottom is usually protected by paint and the water in the bilge is most likely fresh from rain.

I really don't think the water the boat floats in makes it rot.* Besides as Walt pointed out no ship worms in fresh water.

The classic mahogany runabouts seem to do just fine on all the fresh water lakes.

Wood boats can last a long time, there are racing catboats on Barnegat Bay* over 100 years old.* Wood boats in the long run cost a lot more than glass boats.

JohnP
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Old 04-02-2011, 02:53 PM   #27
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

For information on Grand Banks boats, this is a good site:

http://www.grandbanksowners.com/gbb/viewforum.php?f=1
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Old 04-02-2011, 03:16 PM   #28
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

If I ever had fresh water in the bottom of my boat I would be looking for internal leaks.
The usual water is a slight sepage from the stern gland.
This keeps a salt content in the small amount of bilge water.
Toreodo worms are always a threat but modern antifouls keep them at bay most of the time but it is also a reason that wooden hull boats should be slipped at least every 12 months.
When I first launched Tidahapah I used to haul out every 6 to 8 months but that really kills the pocket, I am now out to 12 monthly but at the moment because of circumstances am out to 14 and can't wait to get the old girl home and out of the water for a few days.

Benn
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Old 04-02-2011, 03:18 PM   #29
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

Another good one is www.gbwoodies.com .***** JohnP
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Old 04-02-2011, 03:23 PM   #30
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

Quote:
Tidahapah wrote:
Toreodo worms are always a threat but modern antifouls keep them at bay most of the time


Benn*** Do you have a worm shoe on your boat?***Here we install an oak piece on the bottom side of the keel with tar paper or copper inbetween.* If you touch bottom and scrape the paint off the worms eat the oak but can't pass into the real keel.

JohnP
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Old 04-02-2011, 09:22 PM   #31
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

No I have a steel shoe that is 10" wide and 4: deep this encapsulates the Iron Bark keel and when fitted it was filled with tar epoxy and thru bolted
every 4 feet.
The shoe goes half way up the stem.
It is more for protection from the reef than anything else but does keep the worms out of the keel.
A sacrificial piece of more worm loved timber used to be used on a lot of timber boats but this practice has fallen away these days with more people fitting a shoe.
One still must keep a good eye around the edges and check for worm bubbles every time you haul out.
If any suspicions a good squirt of creasote does the trick.
Benn
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Old 04-03-2011, 03:19 PM   #32
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RE: A wood hull for three years?

Yeah nothing sacrificial about a 3/8" steel shoe.
If it goes we have done some pretty bad damage.
But properly done it negates the need for a sacrificial worm board.

Benn
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