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Old 04-24-2014, 12:48 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by dannc View Post
We have both jumped into the idea of getting a trawler with both feet. I am more so only because I like to deep dive this stuff and research the heck out of a subject. Which is one of the reasons I think getting a trawler appeals to me so much because there are so many things to know.

One sad reality of the type of boating we wish to do, is that we have to have time and money for these trips, which pretty much means we have to be retired. It is possible that in five years we could have money for the boat we want but then the problem would be time. If we don't have the time, I cannot justify the money even if we had it to spend.

This pretty much mean we will be OLD. Course the kids call us OLD now and I can't disagree with them though I do not feel OLD. Looks might be a clue though. The sad truth this presents is that we can see a relatively short boating time frame due to age.

My wife is not afraid to work on engines and such since she grew up on a farm.

We have set up a "plan" on what we have to do if we wish to really get a trawler. First step is the Trawler Fest in WA in May. I have been on week long cruises on a 33 foot sail boat with 3-5 people and know how a small boat can get smaller. Our first Go/No Go will be her seeing the boat we are interested in at the Fest. It is not a small boat but will SHE think it is too small. It could be a No Go.

If it is a Go, then we can start planning vacations where we BOTH get training. I have a list of classes to take on boats the same size we are interested in buying. BOTH of us have to have operation skills or we won't go. I am not a risk adverse person, and I have done, and still do things that one is NOT supposed to do, but I manage the risk. For the trips we wish to take, it is not an acceptable risk to only have one person who can operate the boat.

I already have First Responder training and CPR certification. Wifey will have get this training if we go down this path.

Before we go on the trips we wish to do, I want a Captains license and it would be best if the wifey had one as well.

I think the skill sets broadly needed, and in no particular order, are:
  1. Boat handling
  2. Risk evaluation
  3. Navigation
  4. First Aid
  5. Weather forecasting
  6. Mechanical skill
  7. Radio communication
We both need these skills, not just one of us. I think the wifey will like boat handling and she will be able to perform the other skills though maybe not prefer to do them. I don't see anything on the list that she cannot do, learn to do, nor anything she would not do.


Later,
Dan
Very good way to approach. We learned so much in our boat search by chartering too.
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Old 04-24-2014, 01:24 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by dannc View Post
We have both jumped into the idea of getting a trawler with both feet. I am more so only because I like to deep dive this stuff and research the heck out of a subject. Which is one of the reasons I think getting a trawler appeals to me so much because there are so many things to know.

One sad reality of the type of boating we wish to do, is that we have to have time and money for these trips, which pretty much means we have to be retired. It is possible that in five years we could have money for the boat we want but then the problem would be time. If we don't have the time, I cannot justify the money even if we had it to spend.

This pretty much mean we will be OLD. Course the kids call us OLD now and I can't disagree with them though I do not feel OLD. Looks might be a clue though. The sad truth this presents is that we can see a relatively short boating time frame due to age.

My wife is not afraid to work on engines and such since she grew up on a farm.

We have set up a "plan" on what we have to do if we wish to really get a trawler. First step is the Trawler Fest in WA in May. I have been on week long cruises on a 33 foot sail boat with 3-5 people and know how a small boat can get smaller. Our first Go/No Go will be her seeing the boat we are interested in at the Fest. It is not a small boat but will SHE think it is too small. It could be a No Go.

If it is a Go, then we can start planning vacations where we BOTH get training. I have a list of classes to take on boats the same size we are interested in buying. BOTH of us have to have operation skills or we won't go. I am not a risk adverse person, and I have done, and still do things that one is NOT supposed to do, but I manage the risk. For the trips we wish to take, it is not an acceptable risk to only have one person who can operate the boat.

I already have First Responder training and CPR certification. Wifey will have get this training if we go down this path.

Before we go on the trips we wish to do, I want a Captains license and it would be best if the wifey had one as well.

I think the skill sets broadly needed, and in no particular order, are:
  1. Boat handling
  2. Risk evaluation
  3. Navigation
  4. First Aid
  5. Weather forecasting
  6. Mechanical skill
  7. Radio communication
We both need these skills, not just one of us. I think the wifey will like boat handling and she will be able to perform the other skills though maybe not prefer to do them. I don't see anything on the list that she cannot do, learn to do, nor anything she would not do.


Later,
Dan
think the skill sets broadly needed, and in no particular order, are:
  1. Boat handling - Good for both, mandatory for one
  2. Risk evaluation - Unless trained in it and use of checklists and mandates... it only comes with intense training and/or experience (I helped research DoD's operational risk management doctrine). As long as you take each step of intensity with one step of experience...most make out just fine. You'll know when it's time to graduate from each level if you are astute and listen to experience.
  3. Navigation - actually the easiest of all for coastal US...especially with learning the use of a chartplotter (which rarely fail) and something like Active Captain to give you a decent guide along the way.
  4. First Aid - most first aid along the coastal US is good but with the internet...only a click away. Things like paramedic skills are great but hard to fit into an already busy schedule and hopefully with the click of an EPIRB....the USCG will be there within the hour. From 35 years as a first responder on the water...buy an AED and learn how to use it...CPR is overrated to the max on the water (read wilderness).
  5. Weather forecasting ...learn to read between forecast lines and how local weather will differ than the "area" broadcasts you really get from most media sources...
  6. Mechanical skill ...nice but only not required...many a professional captain doesn't know which end of a screwdriver to hold. Let a pro keep your boat in tiptop shape...and mech skills are less important. venture across oceans or to the ends of the earth...different story.
  7. Radio communication....nice but relatively easy to get the hang of...just listen and learn. Not too much else you have to learn beyond what you hear every weekend on ch 16 and 13. Remember if your radio is DSC capable..and it's MMSI programmed with a GPS input... the red button is the most you need to know other than plain language. You don't have to sound like a seasoned fishing boat capt...in fact, many of them sound stupid anyway. If really in trouble, the on switch of the EPIRB/PLB is all you really need anyway.
It's really not all that hard to do coastal and interior US...just some basics and off you go. If it was that hard..many here wouldn't be here....
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Old 04-24-2014, 02:07 PM   #23
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My husband and I know a lot of boating couples through our years of yacht club membership. I know ONE woman who will take her boat out by herself. Not me. I will drive and I will dock on a face dock but I am pertrified of our slip. Too much $$$ floating around. I need to try it sometime at slack with no wind.

We know a few couples where the wife has zero to do with the boat. Some we have never seen her, others maybe seen her at a land event. For them, they are happy to let the guy do his thing while they do theirs. Know several sailors who race on Saturday while the wife is shopping or riding her horse or whatever thing she does. Works for them but would not be MY thing. I LOVE that my husband and I boat together.

As for division of duties on the boat and the idea of "admiral" yes my husband will tell people I am the admiral and ulitimately in charge. I am NOT one to second guess him--we make our plans together and do boat projects together. It think it is more if I do voice a concern he will defer to me as he wants me to be happy and feel safe on the boat. Really we have rarely had any situations where this has come into play and if it does, we discuss and agree on a course of action. I think it is more a man's joke to call his wife the admiral. Whatever.

As to the forum, he also has an account but rarely comes on here. He does not do social media stuff or online stuff much at all. I have a blog, though I haven't kept it up much lately. I used to be way more active on here but I am just too busy lately to take the time. Just chanced upon this thread!

I just got a new toy last weekend to add to our fleet.
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Old 04-24-2014, 03:01 PM   #24
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I've always thought the whole "admiral" thing to be very disrespectful. The way it's often meant is, "well, I'm the captain of the boat but my wife can pull the plug even though she can't operate the boat."
Really? I use that term sometimes and have several friends that use the term also. Not one of us thinks that it means "she can't operate the boat" (as mine can and most of the others as well).

Pull the plug - yes, I agree.

Do you really know people that mean it that way?

If anything, it is a sign of respect on our boat as she has the ultimate authority on a go/no go decision, which she has used a couple of times on the Straight of Georgia (I like it rough, she doesn't), and many other aspects of our boating as well (destinations, how many days, etc.). Nothing disrespectful there. And, if there was, believe me, I'd hear about it. I'm sure my friends would hear about it also if their wives were offended..

Admirals outrank captains. Always have, always will. Nothing disrespectful about that.
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Old 04-24-2014, 03:07 PM   #25
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We were out fishing and heard a woman screaming from a cuddy cabin power boat slowly moving in circles. It seems they were trolling, her husband became disabled and she did not know what to do. A nearby party boat went alongside, a crewmen jumped aboard and took command of the vessel but it was too late as by then the husband had died.
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Old 04-24-2014, 04:04 PM   #26
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Pineapple Girl,

That looks just like my 21' Chaparral. Close?
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Old 04-24-2014, 04:20 PM   #27
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Pineapple Girl,

That looks just like my 21' Chaparral. Close?

2000 chap 186ssi! So baby brother to yours.
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Old 04-24-2014, 04:23 PM   #28
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Mines a 2000 216ssi so they're like twins!
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Old 04-24-2014, 05:03 PM   #29
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2000 chap 186ssi! So baby brother to yours.

Nifty looking new sled. I'll look you and Matt up next trip and check her out.
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Old 04-24-2014, 05:51 PM   #30
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The Coast Guard Auxiliary offers a "Suddenly in Command" course for just such a case, where the skipper is disabled and the other person must take command of the vessel. It is a comprehensive one day course.
I taught a similar course at our yacht club for years. Excellent course. I have strong opinions about any guy who repeatedly takes a woman out on the water if she doesn't know some basics about the boat and boating.

Would strongly suggest such a course.
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Old 04-24-2014, 07:23 PM   #31
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Admiral and Captain leave for weekend on boat in couple hrs.

There - I said it and she likes it - The "A" word!!


Admiral: A word and/or meaning raucously enjoyed by some... dreaded by others! Usually meaning not too much to most!
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Old 04-24-2014, 10:00 PM   #32
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PG I was going to ask you to post a pic of your new runabout.

Thanks. Is she an OB. Or IO?
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Old 04-24-2014, 10:17 PM   #33
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I've always thought the whole "admiral" thing to be very disrespectful. The way it's often meant is, "well, I'm the captain of the boat but my wife can pull the plug even though she can't operate the boat."
Well, yeah, that's exactly what my Admiral is, and she'll be the first one to tell you that. She likes being the Admiral, she doesn't know anything about the boat and knows she's got a steep learning curve ahead of her once we start cruising, but she loves the water and for that reason, I adapt. I never thought anything about the term being derogatory. Neither did she.

Like any other term, sometimes it fits.
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Old 04-24-2014, 11:54 PM   #34
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Eric, I/O volvo 5.0
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Old 04-25-2014, 08:52 AM   #35
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My wife, like Jennifer, has dockophobia. She tenses up even handling lines. I often handle everything solo even when she is aboard, just to avoid stressing her out. We had a difficult situation docking in the wind on one of her first times aboard, and she hasn't quite gotten over it yet.

Other than that, she's very helpful. She, as well our teenagers, can take the helm in open water; they've all had practice at MOB drills and are getting confident on watch if I have a nap. But docking - not a chance. I think my daughter will be ready to try before my wife.
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Old 04-25-2014, 09:21 AM   #36
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most first aid along the coastal US is good but with the internet...only a click away...CPR is overrated to the max on the water (read wilderness).
I wish I had seen this earlier.

I'm sorry but this is really bad and dangerous advice. If this had any effect on any reader, please research it more from people involved with emergency medical response.

If there is ever a real medical emergency, even I wouldn't grab for my iPad and the internet as an early response. And I've seen blood shooting out of places on patients where it didn't belong and don't panic about those kinds of things. Trust me, if you see that happening on a loved one, you won't be able to remember how to turn on the computer.

Now sure, get a tick bite, and the computer is great. But there's a certain amount of basic first aid and emergency medical knowledge that anyone venturing off needs to know. And that includes most of the ICW.

I've had the unpleasant opportunity to perform CPR multiple times. It is never like it looks on TV and patients never cough and wake up after it. But CPR does something critically important - it keeps the patient alive until more definitive care is available. The main issue with cruising is that the medical response time increases from under 10 minutes on land to 30-45 minutes on water (and even longer). 50 miles out to sea, yeah, CPR won't matter - the patient is going to die. But that's quite a rare mode of cruising for most of us. For a significant amount of our time on the water, we're within VHF response to some fire department. You'd be amazed.

This is one of the reasons why it is so important for a significant other to be able to operate the boat and keep it moving and in safe water. It's got to be near second nature because they might be having to render emergency care at the same time during a very, very stressful situation.

Bottom line - learn CPR now unless you've had a course in the last 2 years. It is not a waste of time at all and it's not something to ignore. It's simple and it will save the life, probably of someone you love.
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Old 04-25-2014, 10:01 AM   #37
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My husband and I know a lot of boating couples through our years of yacht club membership. I know ONE woman who will take her boat out by herself. Not me. I will drive and I will dock on a face dock but I am pertrified of our slip. Too much $$$ floating around. I need to try it sometime at slack with no wind.

We know a few couples where the wife has zero to do with the boat. Some we have never seen her, others maybe seen her at a land event. For them, they are happy to let the guy do his thing while they do theirs. Know several sailors who race on Saturday while the wife is shopping or riding her horse or whatever thing she does. Works for them but would not be MY thing. I LOVE that my husband and I boat together.

As for division of duties on the boat and the idea of "admiral" yes my husband will tell people I am the admiral and ulitimately in charge. I am NOT one to second guess him--we make our plans together and do boat projects together. It think it is more if I do voice a concern he will defer to me as he wants me to be happy and feel safe on the boat. Really we have rarely had any situations where this has come into play and if it does, we discuss and agree on a course of action. I think it is more a man's joke to call his wife the admiral. Whatever.

As to the forum, he also has an account but rarely comes on here. He does not do social media stuff or online stuff much at all. I have a blog, though I haven't kept it up much lately. I used to be way more active on here but I am just too busy lately to take the time. Just chanced upon this thread!

I just got a new toy last weekend to add to our fleet.
Nice runabout Jennifer! You going to use as a tow-behind at all... so you always have a scotter available while on the hook with Big Mo Boat?

What type runabout was it that you mentioned as a "Money Pit"?

I offed one of the $$$$ grabbers last year. It was a 19' Maliby Skier that needed restoration. We're currently sticking with our fun little 4 seater Crestliner 50 hp Johnson o/b tow behind!

Happy Boating Daze! - Art
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Old 04-25-2014, 10:20 AM   #38
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My wife and I have been boating for most of 40 years having started out racing sail boats. Our crew for passages is her sister who races her own sailboat. My wife can and does handle maintenance when needed, can dock the boat, do navigation, etc as well as most but prefers to not be captain (that's me) as from our racing days the rule has always been that there can only be one captain on a boat.
I always thought the admiral thing was a bit campy. In our case she is the 1st officer. As the second in command she has skills and capabilities similar to mine plus is responsible to provide feedback, make provisional plans and disagree with options for the captain. The Navy way. Overall, I'm responsible for whatever happens. The Navy way.
When I became sick in the Exumas this winter and had to leave the boat she and her crew sister and now the new #1 brought the boat back to the mainland without a problem, moved the boat a couple of times since and has been doing required maintenance for the last couple of months. She was trained, stepped up to the plate and has enjoyed all the new learning experiences that comes with her command.
Having said all of this, my wife was prepared for taking over command. While maintenance and some aspects of running the boat were areas that I always took care of she and her sister took notes, made check lists and took mini classes from me on things like the difference between DC and AC power.
I know I'm gifted.
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Old 04-25-2014, 10:33 AM   #39
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We do watch standing in two hour shifts when cruising. Your watch, you dock it, lock thru, etc. If in doubt we team up to handle the situation. Builds confidence and safety in worse case situations. Good feeling to know if somehow you go overboard that your mate can hit the MOB button and do a 360 to retrieve you. Not to speak of the before mentioned emergency medical situations.
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Old 04-25-2014, 10:52 AM   #40
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Very good way to approach. We learned so much in our boat search by chartering too.
The training/class/school that is at the current top of the list has three classes. Two classes can be taken together and take about a week. The third class is a short offshore trip that also takes a week.

At a minimum, we would take the first two classes and MAYBE start charting a boat in NC for short, inshore trips. The third class is really important because it will be a big test for the wife and seasickness. Certainly after the third class, limited chartering would be doable.

I have two parallel careers and both require constant training/education. One career has mandatory training every year and some of the classes are on the same subject year after year after year which might sound repetitive, which it is, but that is a good thing. I have noticed, even though I KNOW the subject matter, I ALWAYS learn something new each class.

There is a different course that seems similar to the school I just mentioned and I think we might take it too. This class is in an area I used to sail in and it would be nice to go back and see how things have changed. A different teaching captain will also provide a different perspective.

Chartering is the step after some training, and depends on how the training goes with both of us, but especially the wife.

Later,
Dan
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