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Old 07-28-2012, 04:40 PM   #21
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Then why not take this to its logical conclusion and make the entire hull out of glass?
Even the head?
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Old 07-28-2012, 05:20 PM   #22
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Even the head?

It's been done already:
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Old 07-28-2012, 06:49 PM   #23
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It's been done already:
As well as a house and an airplane.
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Old 07-28-2012, 10:47 PM   #24
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[QUOTE Wonder what the "portholes" on either side are for--to make it look "shippy"? .[/QUOTE]

"SHIPPY" A highly subjective term.
Case in point:
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Old 07-29-2012, 10:49 AM   #25
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Fashion seems to be more important than seaworthiness for some.
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:13 AM   #26
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Fashion seems to be more important than seaworthiness for some.
Probably for most.

The popular "sport cruiser" style (think Sea Ray, Bayliner, Maxim, Four Winns, etc.) is a good example. They are fashionable and stylish and look fast even at the dock, but they are not the best design for rough water operation.

But, you pay your money and you take your choice. I happen to prefer the trawler style.
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:24 AM   #27
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Fashion seems to be more important than seaworthiness for some.
First you need to define seaworthiness.

I suspect that 99.7 percent of the boats here (including your own) don't operate anyplace or in conditions that "seaworthiness" in the traditional sense is a factor.

If fashion is so evil, what was the reason you chose your boat other than appearance or some other Walter Mitty fantasy? It certainly doesn't need angled windshields, a steel hull, a mast and sails, or anything else besides a galley table and an icebox to cruise around the inland waters of Suisun Bay or Carquinez.

A RIB or a small center console is quite capable of handling the conditions experienced by nearly all of us on our boats that seldom if ever go beyond shouting distance of land.
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:42 AM   #28
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I believe boats made and sold in Europe have different certifications of "seaworthiness",so in theory, one wouldn't take a boat certified for inland lakes out to the North Sea.

Not so in the USA. It's up to the judgement of the operator to decide if it's safe to take an 18' bow rider into the open ocean. And we know how that "judgement" thing is working out.

As for how boats are usually operated, it's better to think more of how they might possibly be operated. For the boat in question, while it might be expected to operate in protected waters, the fact is, that someone might put it in a situation where the design presents a safety issue.
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:55 AM   #29
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Who here actually knows the design specs of that window or the stability curves of that boat?

If you do ...feel free to talk seaworthy...if not it's just an opinion and based on what I guess most of you have been out in a pretty limited one at that.

I'll be the first to say most of my boating has been in pretty mild conditions...I bought the sucker...why beat it up. Now on the pro side...been in a lot and studied a lot. And I still wouldn't comment on the seaworthyness of that boat because I don't need someone writing a post like this calling ME sounding stupid for doing so.

For all anyone knows...that window could be the strongest or most seaworthy part of the boat....looks good? Different story but don't call seaworthyness into it unless you have more info than a quick glance at some picture....
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Old 07-29-2012, 11:59 AM   #30
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Living on the Great Lakes puts me in the 0.3% where seaworthyness is a factor, and there are many others in my situation on the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. Michigan has more registered boats than any other state and there are 4 other states and Canada encompassing these waters. Lots of boaters!

Here you can have dead calm for days interspersed with days of 15-20 mph winds, 5-7 ft waves, thunderstorms and associated gusts to 30 mph.

Everyone here has a healthy respect for these waters as they have claimed almost 300 large commercial freighters, transport, cruise ships, fishers and large sailing vessels over the last couple of hundred years. When the weather is bad, people scurry for the nearest port of refuge (which are about every 20 mi along the shore and where you can't be refused safe harbor).

Still, people tend to own "go fast" boats in order to get to a destination and back in their vacation windows. Sea Rays, Carvers, and Tiaras are very popular and until recently trawlers were quite rare.

My conclusion is that people here do like the fashion boats, understand that they are not particularly seaworthy, and thus have learned to be cautious and weather sensitive. Even with a coastal cruiser, on our last two week trip up to the North Channel, we had 3 weather days out of 14 cruising days.
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:09 PM   #31
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I worked as a delivery captain and maintenance tech for a Sea Ray dealership..... and I got news for some of you...a 41 Dancer can take more than most of our 40 something trawlers can and then some more...it doesn't have the range but it can outrun the easy weather and is just as strongly built, has all the proper thruhull stuff, has no windows to the interior of the boat to knock out, etc, etc.

If I was in 20 foot breaking seas, I would feel better in my friends 41 dancer than any but a handful of trawlers I see our avatars.
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:11 PM   #32
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Ok How many times have wheel house windows been broken ? i have been in to boats off shore and ended up with either broken windows or a hatch being damaged to the point of leaking. i would call that boat a ICW cruiser as i sure would not want to bet the life of everyone on board that they can withstand those oh Sh** moments when it goes bad real fast! My biggest memory at 14 is being in a storm and loosing a window in the wheel house of my dads boat taking a seat from the galley and cutting the cushion off taking the plywood base and nailing it over the window to keep sea water and rain out of the helm area.
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Old 07-29-2012, 12:50 PM   #33
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Ok How many times have wheel house windows been broken ? i have been in to boats off shore and ended up with either broken windows or a hatch being damaged to the point of leaking. i would call that boat a ICW cruiser as i sure would not want to bet the life of everyone on board that they can withstand those oh Sh** moments when it goes bad real fast! My biggest memory at 14 is being in a storm and loosing a window in the wheel house of my dads boat taking a seat from the galley and cutting the cushion off taking the plywood base and nailing it over the window to keep sea water and rain out of the helm area.
And the point you are trying to make is????
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Old 07-29-2012, 01:37 PM   #34
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I know of at least two companies who produced completely clear small boats. One of them was over fifty years ago. The idea was that you could see what was under you. The problem was that they got scratched up pretty quick.

A friend of mine operates a large boat with big glass windows in the bottom. He takes people on tours of the reefs from Biscayne National Park south of Miami.
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Old 07-29-2012, 05:59 PM   #35
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I think psneeld has the right perspective here. There's no telling how strong that window is from the outside or my photo. For all I know it has an internal cover, too, to seal off the opening. You can do anything if you throw enough money at it.

As yachts go it's not all that big. So perhaps it's used more as a coastal cruiser than an open-ocean boat. I didn't walk round the back to check the home port. The name of the boat or the brand was Freya as I recall.
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Old 07-29-2012, 06:47 PM   #36
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In Short i dont see any boat with low or large windows being class rated for anything other than ICW or Lakes. After reading how the Sail boats and Trawlers qualify for Open ocean / Blue water rating. Not only is it the window but its the frame and ablilty to stay water proof and intact during hard sea rolls. Same with the hatches.
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Old 07-29-2012, 07:18 PM   #37
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I suspect that 99.7 percent of the boats here (including your own) don't operate anyplace or in conditions that "seaworthiness" in the traditional sense is a factor.

If fashion is so evil, what was the reason you chose your boat other than appearance or some other Walter Mitty fantasy? It certainly doesn't need angled windshields, a steel hull, a mast and sails, or anything else besides a galley table and an icebox to cruise around the inland waters of Suisun Bay or Carquinez.
Bought my boat for gunkholing and coastal cruising for which it was designed. If I intended to do open-ocean sailing in other than benign conditions, I would have preferred to get one with much smaller saloon windows and a deck designed to shed water quicker. Have often stated here the primary factors for selecting the boat and won't repeat them here. Anyway, Walter Mitty factors were low on the list.
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Old 07-29-2012, 07:35 PM   #38
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If fashion is so evil, what was the reason you chose your boat other than appearance or some other Walter Mitty fantasy?
Maybe I'm a wannabe salvage tug captain.

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Old 07-29-2012, 09:11 PM   #39
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[QUOTE=RickB;96367]

If fashion is so evil, what was the reason you chose your boat other than appearance or some other Walter Mitty fantasy?

I agree that there's nothing particularly wrong with fashion, but what's the fantasy of those who buy boats that look like a cross between a nike trainer and a steam iron? Also know around these parts as p*n*s boats.
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Old 07-29-2012, 09:27 PM   #40
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In Short i dont see any boat with low or large windows being class rated for anything other than ICW or Lakes. After reading how the Sail boats and Trawlers qualify for Open ocean / Blue water rating. Not only is it the window but its the frame and ablilty to stay water proof and intact during hard sea rolls. Same with the hatches.
What class ratings are you refering to?

And big deal....you think building a seaworthy window is that big of an engineering feat or would cost as much as a moon shot?

Especially on the side of a vessel? If a wave strong enough to punch a well built window out slams into the broiadside of the vessel...stability may well be an issue LONG before the window becomes a concern.
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