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Old 07-28-2015, 02:57 PM   #1
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why we have a trawler and NOT a sailboat

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Old 07-28-2015, 03:04 PM   #2
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Or, hours of boredom interspersed with moments of panic.
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Old 07-28-2015, 03:05 PM   #3
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As Marin would say "How is you catch yield this year?".....

Trawler type.....
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:01 PM   #4
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I don't know about going slow. I'd rather be on an equally sized sailboat on the open ocean than on a KK42. When we had our sailboat our best 24 hours was 196 miles. Now wet, that depends.

Edit: OK, OK, I see the humor but I still like to sail. There's nothing like a passage, in the middle of the ocean, with horizon to horizon stars, going 7 plus knots with no engine noise.
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:45 PM   #5
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I'm with Larry.

I've been on sailboats from Annapolis to Providence, from Providence to Bermuda and from Norfolk to the VIs. Hardly going nowhere and I felt much safer in the sailboats in conditions in which I would not dream of taking a trawler out. I imagine many former sail boaters have had similar experiences.

Now the expense part I mostly agree with. Partly because two of those trips were on a 76-ft Alden cutter-rigged ketch. It was museum quality and had a full time crew. (The owner being the former owner of Alden Yachts helped here.) I do think fondly of his diesel bills, however.

Point to me is that it's a lifestyle choice just like anything else in boating. Priorities and interests change, which is why we're in a "trawler" now. Nothing right or wrong about either preference, IMHO.
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:53 PM   #6
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"Trawlerin'"ain't nothing but sailin' with noise, and a bit more comfort.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:01 PM   #7
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Sail is an extremely antiquated means of propulshion.

Requires far too many boat design compromises and added expensive and weighty features including an engine for when the wind dosn't blow and maneuvering in harbor. The engine and sails and related rigging probably costs more than the boat. It's nuts that people still sail.

It's fun I'll admit I like to sail ... small boats like 12 to 19'.

If one boats only at a place like Bellingham Bay, big enough and the wind is almost dependable every day of the summer it makes sense and I'd recomend it to anyone that enjoys it. But if someone says "hey, let's go to Juneau" .. I'd say leave the sailboat or sell it. If you want to go somewhere get a good powerboat.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:11 PM   #8
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All I'm going to say is that I endured a VERY EMBARRASSING experience with a blowboat during my tenure as a cadet at Great Lakes Maritime that essentially turned me off to the whole thing for life. Pretty sure that I now know what inspired the likes of Robert Fulton and Olie Evenrude to go and accomplish what they did.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:14 PM   #9
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Well I don't know. I have made several trips on sailboats that were pretty darn comfortable. Those boats typically averaged 7-8 knots and could handle conditions that would destroy or sink most "recreational trawler type boats". As mentioned above, I would much rather be out in 25 knots and 10-15 foot seas on a sailboat than on a similar sized powerboat.

Where the powerboat (trawler type) excels is in having big windows and a cabin where you can sit comfortably while enjoying the surroundings.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:25 PM   #10
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Sail is an extremely antiquated means of propulshion.

Requires far too many boat design compromises and added expensive and weighty features including an engine for when the wind dosn't blow and maneuvering in harbor. The engine and sails and related rigging probably costs more than the boat. It's nuts that people still sail...
Eric: I can tell you have a sense of humor and are just baiting us sailors - and I'll bite. Lena and I crossed the Pacific, sailed to NZ twice, crossed the southern IO, across the Atlantic to South America and ended up on the East Coast. Something we couldn't do in a power boat if for nothing else we couldn't afford one large enough (plus fuel) for the comforts that we had on the sailboat. Your comment about engine, sails and rigging costing more than the boat, not close.

Here's our boat before we went back to the dark side.

presenting s/v Allons'y: a Semi-Custom Slocum 43
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:44 PM   #11
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But if someone says "hey, let's go to Juneau" .. I'd say leave the sailboat or sell it.
Well.... maybe not.

Good friends of ours used to have a Newport 30 sloop. About five or six years ago they decided they wanted to go up the Passage to SE Alaska and explore around some. They allotted five months for the trip.

They made the trip and had a fantastic time. During that five months they were able to sail the boat exactly once, at the bottom end of Johnstone Strait when the wind, current, and their destination were all in alignment for a few hours. The rest of the time they motored. And for this five month voyage with all sorts of side trips their diesel consumption totaled------ 185 gallons.

By design and necessity sailboats are easily driven compared to the typical diesel cabin cruiser. So if money is an object in one's cruising, a sailboat, even under power, can be an economical way to go if the accommodations are acceptable.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:47 PM   #12
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Larry. Now that I've seen the Slocum, I'd say that the boat looks like the Krogen 42' of sailboats and the 42' looks like the Slocum of powerboats.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:57 PM   #13
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Well I don't know. I would much rather be out in 25 knots and 10-15 foot seas on a sailboat than on a similar sized powerboat.
Having weathered some nasty chop last week during our cruise on the Pamlico and Ocean south of Beaufort, I'd tend to agree. Admittedly, our 28 footer is a bit small, we'd have been much more comfortable in our old Bristol 35.5..
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Old 07-28-2015, 06:08 PM   #14
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We used to sail, and when the schedule said we could go, we did. Weather be damned. Now it is on our schedule, when, where, and how we want to go. Lot's more weather laydays, and just sitting on the mooring having lunch. If I have a Hankerin for sailin' I'll throw the sunfish in the back of the truck and drag it down to the pond and get wet. The kids, and soon the Grandkids will enjoy that sunfish when it's time. But for now, I'll stick to trawlerin'. Good word there Ancora!
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Old 07-28-2015, 07:40 PM   #15
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Confession: I have owned 2 sailboats and crewed on others.
We do an an annual cruise which includes a 20Nm coastal transit. Every year, for some reason, the northbound transit is rough. We usually catch up with our sailboat friends, sailing smoothly but slowly,engine noise free, angle of heel nicely balanced by sail and long keel interaction, while we bounce around affected by swell and wind waves accompanied by the sound of 2 Lehmans and their exhausts. That`s when I envy them.
But, when it comes to enjoying a drink and dinner in roomy surroundings, taking a hot shower, bedding down for a comfortable night, it`s a different story.
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Old 07-28-2015, 07:44 PM   #16
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They made the trip and had a fantastic time. During that five months they were able to sail the boat exactly once, at the bottom end of Johnstone Strait when the wind, current, and their destination were all in alignment for a few hours. The rest of the time they motored. And for this five month voyage with all sorts of side trips their diesel consumption totaled------ 185 gallons.
Now compare that to my experience. I left Port Orchard with full tanks and when I arrived in Ketchikan I filled up with 400 gallons. Toured around SE Alaska for a month and am now back in Ketchikan where I filled up again with almost 300 gallons. That's about 3.3 gallons per hour of runtime including heater and generator but I have been warm and dry.
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Old 07-28-2015, 08:23 PM   #17
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Now compare that to my experience. I left Port Orchard with full tanks and when I arrived in Ketchikan I filled up with 400 gallons. Toured around SE Alaska for a month and am now back in Ketchikan where I filled up again with almost 300 gallons. That's about 3.3 gallons per hour of runtime including heater and generator but I have been warm and dry.
I think that makes the point as good as any example I've read.
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Old 07-28-2015, 08:25 PM   #18
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Wifey B: Too freaking lazy....we admit it. Sailing is work. We love to sail when someone else is doing the work. Like a charter in San Fran or Annapolis or Cancun.

Reason 2-Space...on a relatively small sail boat tis like a chamber to torture claustrophobic's. Might meet the boat half the equation but misses the vacation home half.
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Old 07-29-2015, 01:28 AM   #19
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Wifey B: Too freaking lazy....we admit it. Sailing is work. We love to sail when someone else is doing the work. Like a charter in San Fran or Annapolis or Cancun.

Reason 2-Space...on a relatively small sail boat tis like a chamber to torture claustrophobic's. Might meet the boat half the equation but misses the vacation home half.
Agreed.

A friend has a 36' mono hull sailboat that we go out on whenever possible.


Being under sail is a wonderful feeling. So peaceful and quiet. And the ride is better in rough water than any power boat I've ever been on...but...it's a lot of work! Sails, Lines.


The cabin is claustrophobic on a good day, and there's no where to see the outside, but outside. Great on a good day, not so when the weather gets ugly.

I'll stick to me powerboats, and whenever I need a sail...I call Tom!
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Old 07-29-2015, 02:14 AM   #20
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Wifey B: Too freaking lazy....we admit it. Sailing is work. We love to sail when someone else is doing the work. Like a charter in San Fran or Annapolis or Cancun.
It can be physical for sure. But a lot depends on where you sail. In small lakes and bays, you're going to stay busy. Along the coast, much less so. And if you catch the trades, you can pretty much set your course and run on the same tack for days. There is also something "live" about a sailboat; when the breeze and the swells are in sync, the rhythm is downright magical.
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