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Old 07-29-2015, 03:24 AM   #21
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My thoughts on sailing

I had a sailboat, about 30 years ago when I was single. It was a Viking 28. I would single hand it around a the gulf islands and it was simplicity. A hand bearing compass and a couple of charts and I could go anywhere. The moment of turning off the engine and the silence of being under sail was magical. Its hard to match a long spinnaker run on a hot summer day. Or being closed hauled and your lee rail buried.

Unfortunately the wind was often just not there and I was under power a great part of the time. But the motion under sail and the safety of having that great big keel under you for stability can't be beat.
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Old 07-29-2015, 05:45 AM   #22
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For most folks its MONEY.

If you want to cruise a long distance , most blow boats have the structure (scantlings) to go to sea.

Corcumnavigations have been done on really (20ft) sailboats.

The initial cost is minor and there is no fuel bill.

The marine motorists are delighted to be up in the air on a volume vessel and enjoy just being near the water.

Distances traveled are minor (compared to a world cruise) so the fuel bill is minor.

Both enjoy the water , its just a different hobby.
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Old 07-29-2015, 10:45 AM   #23
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Wifey B: Actually we did like sort of own two sailboats once. They were promotional styrofoam sailboats one of the boat dealers had purchased with their name on the sails. He used them at boat shows for attention (really smart cause could put on top of a double deck pontoon and have the largest, highest sign at the show.) He sold them for like $120 or something as he bought way too many and no one really wanted them so we bought two. On Sunday afternoons when the lake was a madhouse, they were sort of cool to just float around on near our dock. Nothing but a piece of styrofoam and a mast and sail. Just a sail propelled float.
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Old 07-29-2015, 11:56 AM   #24
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I love sailing but it's tough to say no to the comfort level even considering the trade offs for seaworthiness and sea kindliness. Comparing two trips in 50 knot winds and big seas the trawler was more comfortable but the sailing boat was faster and more exhilarating. I'm finally with Dashew and now on the dark side but in a condo class trawler although my wife wants our next boat to have sails.


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Old 07-29-2015, 12:14 PM   #25
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I just got home from a trip to Barkley Sound. Lots of motorsailing as I was travelling on a schedule. Sails were invaluable for the steadying of roll they provided. The small performance boost of the sails was nice but not important.

The amount of wind and sail needed to eliminate virtually all rolling was quite small. The trip has opened my eyes to the concept of a motorsailer that is heavy on motor and light on sail. Some models with larger pilothouses appear to have quite spacious interiors.

-Safety and security of a deep balasted keel.
-Motoring efficiency of a sailboat.
-Rolling mostly eliminated (as long as one is OK with healing)
-Sails provide somewhat of a "get home engine".
-Dryness of a pilothouse.

I think I the concept has a lot of merit - far more than the low sales volume of these boats suggest.

Steve
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Old 07-29-2015, 12:18 PM   #26
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On our recent holiday we bumped into some friends at Europa Point Hot Springs in Gardner Canal on BC's north coast. There were 5 of them who were aboard a 30 foot sailboat for a couple weeks...their eyes bugged out when they came aboard our 30 foot trawler with all that elbow room and liveable space

To be fair, their boat can handle far worse conditions, but there are so many places to duck into should the weather get snotty...and as former sea kayakers we keep a pretty close eye on if conditions will be worsening or not. Besides, anchoring in some new bay is an opportunity to hike and photograph a new creek, beach, or forest
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Old 07-29-2015, 12:41 PM   #27
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The first time I saw the inside waters of the PNW was on a pair of ferrys, one from Prince Rupert to Kelsey Bay and one from Sidney to Anacortes through the San Juans. A friend and I were on our way back from a five week fishing and camping trip in the Yukon with my Land Rover.

While it would be another two years before I moved to the area and a bunch of more years before my wife and I bought a cruising boat, one thing that stayed iwth me that whole time was that all the sailboats I saw along the Inside Passage and through the San Juans were motoring.

Living in Hawaii, my friends with ocean-capable sailboats only motored in and out of harbors. Over there, the wind blows 24/7/365 and it's a lot of wind.

When we decided to get into cruising in the PNW, we thought about a sailboat. I like them and know how to sail them (but I was certainly no expert). But that memory of every sailboat running around under power, plus the fact that my wife (and I) did not particularly like the idea of being down in a cabin inside a hull with just slits for windows to look at at the terrific scenery around here, steered us to powerboats. We chartered one, liked it, and bought one.

I still think sailboats (nicely designed ones) are far more aesthetic and beautiful than powerboats, but in this area with its squirrely winds and strong currents and so much cool stuff to look at a powerboat to us makes more sense.
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Old 07-30-2015, 03:59 AM   #28
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Some interesting comments.

I don't really see cruising type sailboats as being any more "work" than power boats. A couple minutes to raise the sails and you're away. Not really any more "work" than checking over the second engine of your twins.

And if you don't feel like raising the sails that day, there is no need to. You can still cruise at the same speed under power.

I do agree about how some sailboats are claustrophobic, but they don't necessarily have to be that way unless you want a bulletproof circumnavigator.

The 44 foot sailing catamaran I'm currently on with boom furling main, salon with wrap around windows, huge covered cockpit, would compare favourably with most trawler type boats in the areas of ease of operation, indoor and outdoor spaciousness, stability & speed.

But it is still not as cool as a trawler.
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Old 07-30-2015, 07:00 AM   #29
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Just to stir things up, I have found:

Sailboats have an undisputed advantage in crossing oceans both because of range and seaworthiness.

Trawlers have an undisputed advantage in cruising America's Atlantic ICW and doing the Great Loop both because of mast height for bridges and the need to travel in narrow channels rivers.

Trawlers are more livable than monohull sailboats both in terms of space and the above the waterline windows.

The increased complexity of the trawlers is mostly due to added lifestyle equipment not necessary but good to have. Larger refrigerators, washing machines, automatic watermakers etc.

Neither sailboats or trawlers have a clear cut cost advantage IN THE LONG RUN as the initial cost of sails, rigging and canvas, and their maintenance and repair, makes up for the increased fuel usage on a trawler (full displacement type). (Note, I repeatedly ask sailors in the Caribbean how much they spend on these items over a five year period and compare it to my diesel usage.)
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Old 07-30-2015, 08:01 AM   #30
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why we have a trawler and NOT a sailboat

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Trawlers are more livable than monohull sailboats both in terms of space and the above the waterline windows.
Contrasted with...below waterline windows? 😁
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Old 07-30-2015, 08:36 AM   #31
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I am one of the classic stories, I sailed my whole life, built a 14' sloop in my teens, etc. My wife mutinied 10 years ago, after 30 years of sailing with me and we now have a trawler. Love the comfort. My 37 year old son, always says we got dad out of a sailboat only to see him buy the slowest powerboat made...lol.
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Old 07-30-2015, 09:36 AM   #32
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I am one of the classic stories, I sailed my whole life, built a 14' sloop in my teens, etc. My wife mutinied 10 years ago, after 30 years of sailing with me and we now have a trawler. Love the comfort. My 37 year old son, always says we got dad out of a sailboat only to see him buy the slowest powerboat made...lol.
Speed would be another of our reasons.
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Old 07-30-2015, 09:38 AM   #33
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Sailboats have an undisputed advantage in crossing oceans both because of range and seaworthiness.
Rumor has that, but....

Sure are a lot of them that do have problems and require rescues and a few just never heard from again.
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Old 07-30-2015, 09:59 AM   #34
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Rumor has that, but....

Sure are a lot of them that do have problems and require rescues and a few just never heard from again.
operator error all to often...the silboats are often found later in fine condition.
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Old 07-30-2015, 10:06 AM   #35
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I have found myself on YW a lot lately looking at sailboats . I would like to move up a little,but a larger trawler that I can afford just doesnt have the look. It probably sounds a little silly but I have to have a look that I like before the comfort .I guess that's easy to say when you have a home that's just 20 minutes from the boat . A sailboat is not what we need here on the river but I sure like looking at those salty ones .With all that said Joy has decided that she will be picking out the next one .
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Old 07-30-2015, 10:11 AM   #36
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Rumor has that, but....

Sure are a lot of them that do have problems and require rescues and a few just never heard from again.
On our trips to NZ and OZ, I can count on one hand the number of power boats under 50' vs several 100 sailboats every year. Maybe that's why you hear about the sailboats.
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Old 07-30-2015, 10:51 AM   #37
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I am gradually making the switch to power from sail for physical reasons. 4 years ago I broke my shoulder blade. Although it healed up well and I have a full range of movement, I find that certain movements are quite painful. My first response was to install electric winches on the sailboat. That helped, but didn't eliminate the problem. In general, I find that I am exhausted by a day underway on the sailboat, but no where near as tired after the same time at the helm of the powerboat. I also find that maintaining the powerboat is physically easier than the sailboat. That is largely due to access issues. Changing the transmission fluid on the sailboat is actually painful since it involves going in under the cockpit head first and working in a very uncomfortable, head down position. The same job on the powerboat is done while seated and takes about 1/4th the time. Lots of other chores are similar. Accommodations on the two boats are similar in size. While the sailboat has two staterooms, the powerboat compensates by having a large upper cabin with lots of windows.

So in my case, the transition is based on physical capabilities as much as anything else. Being in your mid-60s imposes some restrictions on lifestyle, at least for me. I expect to have made the complete transition to power by the time I hit 70, which isn't that far away. For now I have two boats.
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Old 07-30-2015, 11:26 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmorris View Post
I am one of the classic stories, I sailed my whole life, built a 14' sloop in my teens, etc. My wife mutinied 10 years ago, after 30 years of sailing with me and we now have a trawler. Love the comfort. My 37 year old son, always says we got dad out of a sailboat only to see him buy the slowest powerboat made...lol.
Similar but now my 32 son is learning to love go slow boats we bought some stand up paddle boards for the boat and the kids love them
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Old 07-30-2015, 11:29 AM   #39
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There is also something "live" about a sailboat; when the breeze and the swells are in sync, the rhythm is downright magical.
YES! thats what I miss about sailing, no powerboat I know can match that. ...but the advantages of the trawler win out in the end.
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Old 01-02-2017, 12:45 PM   #40
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Eric: I can tell you have a sense of humor and are just baiting us sailors - and I'll bite. Lena and I crossed the Pacific, sailed to NZ twice, crossed the southern IO, across the Atlantic to South America and ended up on the East Coast. Something we couldn't do in a power boat if for nothing else we couldn't afford one large enough (plus fuel) for the comforts that we had on the sailboat. Your comment about engine, sails and rigging costing more than the boat, not close.

Here's our boat before we went back to the dark side.

presenting s/v Allons'y: a Semi-Custom Slocum 43

I know this is a super old thread, but I was just thinking about sailboats with a PH design and ran across this.

Larry, is the the kind of boat you and Lena did your big adventure on? I still want a sailboat to take to the Bahamas and Caribbean.
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