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Old 12-09-2018, 05:18 PM   #1
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Why does my boat swing so much at anchor?

Hi All

Very much a newbie here and to this form of boating. Seeking some advice on how to reduce the amount of swing when anchored. In most instances we anchor in relatively calm waters but while boats around me appear to move very little, mine swings back and forth. I don't know if its the bimini top on the flybridge or just the style of boat. I read a post somewhere that attaching a sea anchor to the anchor chain just below water level resolves the problem. Well it didn't...lol.

Thanks in advance.

Mike
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:20 PM   #2
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Hi there & welcome aboard!

Search TF or Internet for ‘riding sail’
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:23 PM   #3
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Welcome Mike.

My boat swings too. I only draw 3'6" and I thing this contributes to more swing when compared to full keel boats. You could also run a stern line to shore.
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:30 PM   #4
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Check out this old thread : "Sailing" at anchor

Our boat has a boom, so a small tarp/sail at the end serves the same function as the feathers on an arrow. There must be solutions out there for trawlers without booms...
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:41 PM   #5
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My boat sails at anchor a fair bit as well. I think it is partly due to the high bow. using a bridle with attachment points part way back toward the middle of the hull helps a bit. But a lot of it arises from windage anyway.

Around Moreton Bay the anchorages can often be busy and some folks anchor closer than you would like. In that case you don't want to have a stern anchor or a shoreline! Also the tidal current reverse, so you definitely want to be able to swing around to the other direction when that occurs or there will be chaos with other boats nearby.

Next year I'm going to install some flopper stoppers for reducing roll when waves/wakes are at a different angle to wind/current. I think they might help reduce the sailing a bit as well.
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:42 PM   #6
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This keeps coming up. The problem is usually a lot of windage forward. Solutions are many, as are opinions about which works best.

Some include: Set the rudder hard over. Run a snubber line to a midship cleat to force the boat to ride at an angle to the wind/current. Set a drogue, sea anchor or just drag a long line, or even trail a bucket aft. A steadying or riding sail has worked for some, but most report no luck with one. Some have gone as far as setting two anchors, but personally I find that more effort than it's worth.
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:47 PM   #7
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As to why...

Do you have a nylon rode? If you do, then your boat would behave like ours.

In windy conditions, without the riding sail, our bow will fall off the wind presenting either the port or starboard side to the wind. The boat gets forced downwind and stretches the rode tight, then the boat springs back upwind when the rode releases it elasticity, and the bow falls off the other way for another ride downwind. Repeat.

The riding sail acts like the feathers on an arrow, reducing the yo-yo effect and the swinging. This also reduces shock loading the anchor every time the boat bounces on the rode.
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Old 12-09-2018, 06:22 PM   #8
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Is this an issue? I mean mine swing when there is some wind, gently in light wind, more intense in heavy wind, however it has never been an issue. Look through windows it looks like cinemascope

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Old 12-09-2018, 07:26 PM   #9
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What about a sea anchor off the stern. If you have any tide running it should help with the swing. Maybe would dampen it a bit. I use one when drift fishing to keep the bow into the current, seems to stabilize the boat.
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Old 12-09-2018, 08:49 PM   #10
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A bridle might help. Sea Dog make a plate which fits on the chain,you attach 2 lines, one to each top corner drilled hole, through each hawse hole back to the bow cleat.
It`s as much a function of how much boat is under the water as anything else. Next time you are anchored look at the Rivs and "sports boats" with planing hulls, they really hunt around an anchor or mooring.
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Old 12-09-2018, 09:40 PM   #11
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Mine swims pretty badly in some anchoring conditions. I've messed with various solutions, none worked very well and were generally a PITA. So now I just ignore it. Boat swims. Have a beer and go to bed.
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Old 12-09-2018, 10:00 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Mine swims pretty badly in some anchoring conditions. I've messed with various solutions, none worked very well and were generally a PITA. So now I just ignore it. Boat swims. Have a beer and go to bed.
Iíll try your solution next time!

Iíve never tried it, but Iíve read that one can tie a line near the stern and tie a hitch on the bitter end of the line to your anchor rode. Tighten the line enough to pull the stern a few degrees to the side. Supposedly this will remove a lot of the ďfish tailingĒ. I can also imagine that by doing this could create a recipe to increase fish tailing. Iíll go back to sleep now...
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Old 12-09-2018, 10:29 PM   #13
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A drogue or sea anchor as far behind as practical. The further behind the sea anchor the more leverage it has in keeping you straight. Usually trailed behind with a buoy back about 2/3 of the line length. Never use chain, only line. The buoy helps get the sea anchor far behind you. Otherwise in shallow water the sea anchor ends up on the bottom right behind the boat. In the ocean in swells or a current you don't need the buoy.
Also a longer anchor line helps. A short scope makes the osculations worse.
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Old 12-09-2018, 11:00 PM   #14
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Osculations? Why are we talking about smooching, when we were't?
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Old 12-10-2018, 05:46 AM   #15
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A quick fix that only works sometimes is to tie off to a fwd. cleat that is NOT in the boats center line.

A stern tie can also work tho it screws up the boats natural ventilation.

Giving the boat a sheer looks funny to passing sailors , but sometimes quiets a dancing queen.

There is too much boat house fwd of the boats pivot point so you have a backwards weather vane..

An aft riding sail works well , if the vessel can rig it.

Easy to try, tho small, is a windsurfer mast and sail.
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Old 12-10-2018, 06:47 AM   #16
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Think of it as a panoramic view of the anchorage
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:19 AM   #17
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Hi,

I have noticed a shorter chain line out to reduce the sailing of 1: 2 up to 1: 3, but notice the Baltic Sea is not a tide and this is bosible.

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Old 12-10-2018, 09:37 AM   #18
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Less windage forward or more aft is needed. try lowering the bimini and see what happens.
Any sort of sea anchor needs a current to work, slow movement of the boat will just take up the slack in its line.

Put some water toys on the side deck aft.

The key is to unbalance the wind effect on the boat
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Old 12-10-2018, 10:47 AM   #19
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Too much swinging on a boat at anchor? Sounds like you guys are having some really good parties.
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Old 12-10-2018, 10:58 AM   #20
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Too much swinging on a boat at anchor? Sounds like you guys are having some really good parties.
And we haven't even started winter yet!!
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