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Old 03-01-2014, 10:48 AM   #21
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AS they say , Beauty is in the eye of the beholder , , Baskin Robbins has dozens of flavors.

Nothing is ever better than what works for YOU!

WE seldom Strut the Yachty Club Dock , so our work boat look does fine by us.
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Old 03-01-2014, 11:14 AM   #22
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Nothing is ever better than what works for YOU!
The quote of the year right there!!!
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Old 03-01-2014, 11:15 AM   #23
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But I was just poking fun at your "redneck eloquence"!!!...
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Old 03-01-2014, 11:37 AM   #24
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It all depends on how much time and money you have. If you need to get there quick and fuel economy is not a consideration, you don't need a trawler. If you have plenty of time and want to operate on a budget, then a trawler is it. You and you only can decide what your cruising style will be like.
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Old 03-01-2014, 12:43 PM   #25
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There are plenty of variations too. There are what is sometimes labelled as "Fast Trawlers" but those with trawler design, semi-displacement hulls and capable of 20 knots. Grand Banks is a good example. Then you also can go to some of the older MY's and while more expensive to operate many are very worthy boats, such as Hatteras. Or go the route of a tug.

Many people who do "trawler boating" do not have Trawlers.
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Old 03-01-2014, 02:02 PM   #26
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There are plenty of variations too. There are what is sometimes labelled as "Fast Trawlers" but those with trawler design, semi-displacement hulls and capable of 20 knots. Grand Banks is a good example. Then you also can go to some of the older MY's and while more expensive to operate many are very worthy boats, such as Hatteras. Or go the route of a tug.

Many people who do "trawler boating" do not have Trawlers.
All very excellent points!!! It does't have to be as black and white as windmill is saying it is. I know he was just making a simple point. I went from sailboats to a displacement speed trawler to a planing semi-planing boat...and now I have a modified V fully planing boat(I must be in a continuous state of reversion.. ) Get what you want but realize the limitations of your choice and that there is no free lunch. For example, a semi-planing boat does just fine on plane but realize that it is not as efficient as a planing hull while planing. And realize that a planing boat at displacement speeds can be not-so-fun in a rough seaway. Just things like that. But in the end, get what is right for you!!! And ask tons of questions like the one that started this thread!

PS...FYI....Grand Banks has been making planing hull boats for about a decade now with their Heritage series as well as East Bay.
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Old 03-01-2014, 02:33 PM   #27
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All very excellent points!!! It does't have to be as black and white as windmill is saying it is. I know he was just making a simple point. I went from sailboats to a displacement speed trawler to a planing semi-planing boat...and now I have a modified V fully planing boat(I must be in a continuous state of reversion.. ) Get what you want but realize the limitations of your choice and that there is no free lunch. For example, a semi-planing boat does just fine on plane but realize that it is not as efficient as a planing hull while planing. And realize that a planing boat at displacement speeds can be not-so-fun in a rough seaway. Just things like that. But in the end, get what is right for you!!! And ask tons of questions like the one that started this thread!

PS...FYI....Grand Banks has been making planing hull boats for about a decade now with their Heritage series as well as East Bay.
GB Heritage and Aleutians are boats I would consider at the upper edge of semi-displacement although I also understand you terming them as planing. Maybe slow planing. At displacement speeds they tend to plow a bit through the water, so give a displacement comfort ride but not as economic as a displacement boat would.

A couple of things GB has also done in moving away from their history is they don't offer any single engine models now, nor anything under 43'. I find that a bit disturbing as that was part of their bread and butter at one time. They sold a lot of 32' and 36' boats.

Every boat is a compromise and the key to selecting one is determining what things are most important to you, where you can compromise, and what you just absolutely can't be comfortable compromising on. Buying a boat is like buying a house and car at the same time and the cars are each tied one to one with the house. So you can't mix car D with house B.

There are some more recent and smaller entries into this market too. One I find most interesting is Elling. As a trawler for the loop, they're well designed. On the other hand, I prefer a flybridge.

Bering fits a unique niche as a steel trawler starting with 50'. There aren't a lot of steel boats in that range.
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Old 03-02-2014, 03:18 AM   #28
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GB Heritage and Aleutians are boats I would consider at the upper edge of semi-displacement although I also understand you terming them as planing.
With all due respect, it has nothing to do with what I "term them". I did not "term them". Grand Banks did. Ray Hunt played a major roll in hull design as did Sparkman and Stephens. Google is your friend...check it out. People wanted faster boats. And in 2005, Grand Banks obliged them....with a modified V planing hull.
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Old 03-02-2014, 03:32 AM   #29
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I think this is an excerpt from Passagemanker Magazine....

<<The look is unmistakably Grand Banks; the timeless profile with molded-in faux planking, teak planked transom, flawless gelcoat, highly polished stainless steel, oversized cleats and hawses, and seriously wide side decks—everywhere you look this yacht connotes upscale quality and experience. The topsides are fuller, the radiused corners are more rounded, and the bow has more rake. There’s noticeably less frilly teak on deck.

This new design has a modified-V planing hull with running gear recessed in tunnels, and there’s a whole lot more going on under the water. Displacing 41,000 lb., she’s powered by two 6.7-liter Cummins 480hp diesels mated to Zeus pod drives, which have rear-facing counter-rotating stainless steel propellers. The 43 EU is designed from the keel up to be a planing boat—but one that can also cruise comfortably at lower, more economical speeds. That’s a claim made by many so-called “fast trawlers,” but this boat really pulls off the fast trawler trick because the Zeus drives deliver exceptional maneuverability at both low speeds and high. I found this yacht like driving a sports car: sure-footed, silky-smooth, and easy to handle at all speeds.

POLITE WAKE

Unlike my vintage semi-displacement Grand Bankses, which created big wakes trying to climb over the bow wave at anything above 9 knots, this new GB 43 EU moves right on up and over the bow wave, flattens out as she comes on plane, and leaves a polite wake at a fast cruise>>
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Old 03-02-2014, 07:02 AM   #30
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Trawler Style cruising usually means cruising at .9 to 1.15 X the SQ RT of the LWL.

Thats where its CHEAP to operate , its the speed ,not the hull shape or weather the deckhouse is 50s retro or egg modern.

Folks that desire to cruise slow usually attempt to maximise on the economy so chose single engine and a non plaining hull.
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Old 03-02-2014, 10:34 AM   #31
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Happy Boating Daze!

Need I say More?!
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:19 AM   #32
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The short answer is no

What you really need to do is accurately assess how you are going to use your boat. Boats have to fit in with where you are in life. You can coastal cruise in a small trailer-able express cruiser. If you fairly young and have to work 5 days a week, this may be the best way to get a lot of cruising in in a variety of locations. If your older and want more comfort, have more leisure time want to spend time at the dock and still be able to knock 100+ miles or so a day than than many of the lighter semi displacement boats like the Bayliners and Meridians are very difficult to beat when it comes to value and usability. If you happen to be able to actually cruise for weeks at a time and need open ocean capability, than you really need to consider a real long range cruiser or a serious cruising sailboat. That real long range cruiser is more likely to sit at the dock because unless you like hanging out within 40 miles or so, you need three or for days to go anywhere. The difference between 6knts and 24knts is huge when it comes to weekend travel. The ability to trailer a boat at 60 mph to anywhere in the continent and cruise is pretty neat. The bottom line is life is full of compromises, you really need to realistically assess how you are going to use your boat and how important the aesthetics of a boat play into enjoying it. I live on a wonderful LRC that sits at the dock most of the time waiting for that real trip while my daughter wears out her 21' tournament boat. Do you really need a trawler, no but they do look like real boats.
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:31 AM   #33
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We chartered a Mainship 350/390 summer 2012 and found it small. I believe it would be a challenge for comfort for anything longer than a week. It really handled nicely though. Pretty much had to operate it from the flybridge which was fine as the weather was nice.

We spent over 2 years looking for our boat. We continually refined what we were looking for. I started by looking at CHB 34's and then went to PT 38's, OA 40 Europa's before we settled on the Pilothouse and eventually the KK 42. Be patient, not be swayed with all of the hype and product out there and try to buy your second boat first.

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Old 03-02-2014, 11:32 AM   #34
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FF wrote;

"Folks that desire to cruise slow usually attempt to maximise on the economy so chose single engine and a non plaining hull."

Your hull is so close to a planing hull many (myself included) would argue that it is.

And if you repowered w two 3-71 engines in place of your 6-71 the difference in fuel economy could be a wash. Perhaps even favor the twin.
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Old 03-02-2014, 11:40 AM   #35
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but they do look like real boats.
Sorry Scary - your Hatteras LRC doesn't just look like it. In my view it is a real boat
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Old 03-02-2014, 02:06 PM   #36
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With all due respect, it has nothing to do with what I "term them". I did not "term them". Grand Banks did. Ray Hunt played a major roll in hull design as did Sparkman and Stephens. Google is your friend...check it out. People wanted faster boats. And in 2005, Grand Banks obliged them....with a modified V planing hull.
With all due respect, these are all just terms. Calling them a modified V planing hull is accurate but it also brings different expectations to one person than another. All hulls are compromises. Yes, people wanted faster, but GB isn't by any means fast. Just faster or not as slow. I'm a huge fan of Grand Banks boats and their history although very disturbed that the future may not be as bright. Most of the Heritage models of recent years have a Ken Smith designed hull, although who designed them really isn't the issue. The 54 Heritage and 53 Aleutian hulls are newer designs.

Now the reality is that the 54 Heritage has a cruising speed of 17-18 knots. While that may be a planing hull that is not what you would normally associate with a planing boat. Partly it is because it is one of the heavier boats in class.

Now all of the designers and labeling is really irrelevant to the point that there are many different type boats that can be used for the type cruising the OP has in mind. GB is an excellent option as it will achieve speeds greater than displacement boats but can still be used comfortably at displacement speeds and, also, it will handle rougher conditions than many in it's range.
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Old 03-02-2014, 03:11 PM   #37
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I like your posts BandB but I'm w Baker on this one.

"cruising speed of 17-18 knots" is definitely the upper end of SD .... either that or planing.

But John I don't think teak is "frilly". It's just beautiful. Some of mine isn't beautiful now ... black.
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Old 03-02-2014, 03:29 PM   #38
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Maybe I was not diligent enough in reading posts to see all this from or to OP on this thread... but... I believe it is best for OP to either visit for-sale boats and get a feel of their accommodations, or better yet rent a couple different size and model boat to get the real "feel of the deal", if you don’t already have it.

What I'm not clear on for you Mr. OP:
1. How many years and how much experience do you have in the pleasure boating (or other marine life) world - Motor or Sail?
2. What is your budget? (I always recommend owning a boat outright, and getting it at the right price)
3. How fast do you really want your boat to go – at below hull speed, general cruise speed, top speed?
4. Do you have anticipated size of boat and its needed range already in mind?

AND - OF GREAT IMPORTANCE!!
5. Is your better half ready and willing??? Keeping Admiral happy on a boat makes fun times for all sailors aboard!

Also, and I did read something similar to this in another post... never let your emotions get ahead of common sense during the review and/or purchase negations of buying a boat. Check it out really well first, then close on the right price in this buyers market... then and only then... once it’s yours should You Allow Your Heart to begin beating fast for love toward your new female play-toy! After all that’s why boats are always called she and her – - > not he and him!

Happy Boating Daze! - Art
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Old 03-02-2014, 04:05 PM   #39
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Maybe I was not diligent enough in reading posts to see all this from or to OP on this thread... but... I believe it is best for OP to either visit for-sale boats and get a feel of their accommodations, or better yet rent a couple different size and model boat to get the real "feel of the deal", if you donít already have it.

What I'm not clear on for you Mr. OP:
1. How many years and how much experience do you have in the pleasure boating (or other marine life) world - Motor or Sail?
2. What is your budget? (I always recommend owning a boat outright, and getting it at the right price)
3. How fast do you really want your boat to go Ė at below hull speed, general cruise speed, top speed?
4. Do you have anticipated size of boat and its needed range already in mind?

AND - OF GREAT IMPORTANCE!!
5. Is your better half ready and willing??? Keeping Admiral happy on a boat makes fun times for all sailors aboard!

Also, and I did read something similar to this in another post... never let your emotions get ahead of common sense during the review and/or purchase negations of buying a boat. Check it out really well first, then close on the right price in this buyers market... then and only then... once itís yours should You Allow Your Heart to begin beating fast for love toward your new female play-toy! After all thatís why boats are always called she and her Ė - > not he and him!

Happy Boating Daze! - Art
Better half is a huge key. It's got to be a joint and even family decision if others are involved. Typically one spouse is more interested in the hull and performance and equipment. The other more in ride and creature comforts. Whether for a day or all days, it's a home.
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Old 03-02-2014, 04:22 PM   #40
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What you really need to do is accurately assess how you are going to use your boat. Boats have to fit in with where you are in life. You can coastal cruise in a small trailer-able express cruiser. If you fairly young and have to work 5 days a week, this may be the best way to get a lot of cruising in in a variety of locations. If your older and want more comfort, have more leisure time want to spend time at the dock and still be able to knock 100+ miles or so a day than than many of the lighter semi displacement boats like the Bayliners and Meridians are very difficult to beat when it comes to value and usability. If you happen to be able to actually cruise for weeks at a time and need open ocean capability, than you really need to consider a real long range cruiser or a serious cruising sailboat. That real long range cruiser is more likely to sit at the dock because unless you like hanging out within 40 miles or so, you need three or for days to go anywhere. The difference between 6knts and 24knts is huge when it comes to weekend travel. The ability to trailer a boat at 60 mph to anywhere in the continent and cruise is pretty neat. The bottom line is life is full of compromises, you really need to realistically assess how you are going to use your boat and how important the aesthetics of a boat play into enjoying it. I live on a wonderful LRC that sits at the dock most of the time waiting for that real trip while my daughter wears out her 21' tournament boat. Do you really need a trawler, no but they do look like real boats.
I have to agree with Scary... Have had boats forever, but we fell in love with trawlers over the Hatteras 48 LRC's. First time I saw one it was like "now that's a boat." We spent a few years looking at Krogens, DeFevers, Flemings, etc. as there are so many great trawlers on the market. Previous owners of our LRC took her thought the Panama canal, to Alaska and made a trip to Bermuda. She is true blue water and the only non Nordhaven invited to make the Atlantic crossing a few years ago. Can guarantee they would not invite me as I don't have near the previous owners blue water experience. So, it is a combination, I agree.

We basically own a floating bowling ball with the dumbest, hardest working, arguably one of the most dependable engines ever made (Detroit 4/53's). Their big brothers, 6/71 & 6/73's won WWII. She displaces, with all our junk and 1,700 gallons of diesel, and 450 gallons of water around 40 tons. Previous owner said with all her weight she always kept popping to the top. I like that...

One of the best parts of these older Hatts is they are not depreciating assets. Our 40 sedan sea ray, that I loved, had to compete at the time of sale with the same and similar models that were going for so little money. Nobody cared about the big Cummins, extensive electronics, or my copious maintenance records. It was all $$$

We would have bought a Fleming except for price. Getting an older Fleming (lower hull number) meant aluminum fuel tanks and no 220V power (around 1993 or so). And, as I recall still around $600,000 plus. I think that if money is no object you can't go wrong with any of the vessels mentioned.

Something to keep in mind about buying a used trawler/boat is financing. Many banks won't consider lending on a boat over 10 years old. Getting financing on a boat as old as the LRC's means you and the bank my split the price 50/50. Just a thought...

We didn't buy our LRC to cross oceans; we love the roominess, ease of getting around the engine room, pilot house, full beam salon, her timeless ship look, solid hull and structure, and the extended cockpit was icing on the cake. personally I love the tranquility of the s. Carolina ICW or just going an hour from home to find a quiet anchorage. These American made LRC's are also supported by a large network of folks that supply parts. Sam's marine will, for example, give you the phone number of the guy that designed the yacht safety center system, or send you an original blueprint of a section of YOUR hull.

Just trying to give some other ideas to consider.
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