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Old 09-14-2015, 07:30 AM   #21
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Why do all the brokers I talk to advise me to avoid Bayliner and Meridian boats?
There is a TF member who is a broker in Florida and he specializes if Bayliner/Meridian boats. He will have nothing bad to say about them and usually has several nice boats on his website. If you do a web search on "pilothouseking", you should find his web site. I haven't seen him posting on TF for several months but he was active last winter.
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:00 AM   #22
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This is a timely thread for me as I'm looking at a 1991 4387 Bayliner and a 2004 459 Meridian as liveaboards. I would be grateful if anyone has had any experience with either of these boats.
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:05 AM   #23
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No experience but if those two boats are in the same price range that's either one sweet Bayliner or a Meridian that's been fire sale priced.
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:13 AM   #24
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Although obviously very similar the 45 and 47 Bayliners have many 'significant' differences in the hull, layout, and the way they handle. While they are both pretty robust the differences between the two should not to be ignored if anyone should ever look at them as a purchase.
Looking at range on the 47 you can pretty much get what you want dependent upon speed chosen - in neutral seas at 6.5 knots or less you are at about 4 nmpg , at 8 knots about 2nmpg , at 10.5 knots about 1 nmpg and at 16 knots about 0.95 nmpg.
One of the key reasons I decided to buy my first larger Bayliner was for the ability to 'fight' the tides I was often against on the Hudson and long Island sound when running my 8 knot trawler.
I have found that these larger Bayliners can run at the lower speeds if desired and get me at or near what I was getting before but also they can get up and plane without too much effort and without breaking the bank.
Hope this helps
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:58 AM   #25
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No experience but if those two boats are in the same price range that's either one sweet Bayliner or a Meridian that's been fire sale priced.
Hi Craig, no they are vastly different prices the Bayliner $160K AUD and the Meridian $289K AUD but I'm looking at a range of options including these two,

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Old 09-14-2015, 10:06 AM   #26
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"This is a timely thread for me as I'm looking at a 1991 4387 Bayliner and a 2004 459 Meridian as liveaboards. I would be grateful if anyone has had any experience with either of these boats."


You can likely get a bunch of feedback on both boats over at the Bayliner owners club where the activity on these larger Bayliners is high.
Additionally there are a number of Aus members that that check in and have experiences with sourcing these boats overseas and moving them back home. Their insight into moving both the boats as well as sourcing parts in that area should provide good value.


Hope this helps
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Old 09-14-2015, 10:11 AM   #27
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Why do all the brokers I talk to advise me to avoid Bayliner and Meridian boats?
OK, I'll bite. What do they tell you to not avoid?
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Old 09-14-2015, 10:16 AM   #28
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OK, I'll bite. What do they tell you to not avoid?
The $2.0 million Eastbay they want to sell you.
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Old 09-14-2015, 10:18 AM   #29
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"OK, I'll bite. What do they tell you to not avoid?"

A great question indeed. I have myself heard some answers to this question from brokers at boat shows and the like but each time they presented an answer they were unable to support it with any data or have the technical background other than a general statement such as "they are cheaply made".
When you than pressed them for details on that answer they always have had none.


But , this is a really great question and one I would always love to hear the answer to.
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Old 09-14-2015, 10:59 AM   #30
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Well can someone explain how they fit the trawler profile?
They don't. But you can operate almost any vessel at trawler speeds and often obtain trawler fuel economy.
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Old 09-14-2015, 11:14 AM   #31
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I don't see a lot of difference between Bayliner and any of the other production boats other than they used excessive amounts of chop in the hull laminate schedule and it took them longer than anyone else in the business to get away from wood cored stringers. High moisture with blistering on the bottom and soft engine stringers would be the two things to look out for.

I have been involved with two Bayliners this year with Hino diesels. One fella spent six months trying to get parts for a rebuild ..... gave up on that and spent the next six months to find a used (non-rebuilt) engine. The other fella is still scouring the internet for parts.
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Old 09-14-2015, 11:59 AM   #32
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"I have been involved with two Bayliners this year with Hino diesels. One fella spent six months trying to get parts for a rebuild ..... gave up on that and spent the next six months to find a used (non-rebuilt) engine. The other fella is still scouring the internet for parts."


Perhaps send them to the BOC or send me a message and I am sure we can help him out.


Hope this helps
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Old 09-14-2015, 12:28 PM   #33
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"I have been involved with two Bayliners this year with Hino diesels. One fella spent six months trying to get parts for a rebuild ..... gave up on that and spent the next six months to find a used (non-rebuilt) engine. The other fella is still scouring the internet for parts."


Perhaps send them to the BOC or send me a message and I am sure we can help him out.


Hope this helps
Thanks Ron, I've not hears any real issues sourcing parts for the Hinos, over at the BOC.
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Old 09-14-2015, 12:31 PM   #34
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Parts for hinos are readily available if you know where to look. On my EH700 I've used North Harbor Diesel for anything I couldn't source locally.


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Old 09-14-2015, 12:43 PM   #35
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Kevin and Ron -

I agree - but I do not know what Hino engines he is referring to or what parts they are seeking. NHD is a good source as well as Earl Summerville , Dredge harbor, Mike Able and a few others that I have used when needed. I have been in touch with one Bayliner Hino owner the past few months rebuilding two engines after a complete sinking over in Subic Bay - he is having more problems with talented labor then sourcing parts. Similarly I have posted back and forth with a couple of owners in Australia and other more remote locations that have had more difficulties with skilled talent then the parts themselves. I look out the window or where I am working today and see 3 Hino powered flatbeds at 'Charlies Towing' across the street. We get a food delivery each week from DiCarlo foods in a Hino powered truck and also an occasional meat delivery in a Hino powered truck. Where I am here in NY they are quite common but mostly known for the fact that they do not usually need service and do not usually need parts - given any reasonable PN that is.
I am sure one of us could send the owners to a source if we knew the engines and parts that the seek.


Hope this helps
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Old 09-14-2015, 06:05 PM   #36
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Here is an illustration of the difference in liferails between a 49' Meridian (Bayliner) and 50' Ocean Alexander in my club. Bayliner is 1", 28" high, small stabilization arm, no rub rail. OA is 1.25", 31" with substantial bulwark, substantial bracing, rub rail.

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Old 09-14-2015, 06:44 PM   #37
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Here is an illustration of the difference in liferails between a 49' Meridian (Bayliner) and 50' Ocean Alexander in my club. Bayliner is 1", 28" high, small stabilization arm, no rub rail. OA is 1.25", 31" with substantial bulwark, substantial bracing, rub rail.

Attachment 44546
Attachment 44547
Yep, how strong is strong enough?

How thick is thick enough?

I walk around my boat all the time and never feel like the rails are going to bend or break.

And btw very few boats I've seen have that double mounting that the OA in the photo has. That's very nice!
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:23 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by boatpoker View Post
I don't see a lot of difference between Bayliner and any of the other production boats other than they used excessive amounts of chop in the hull laminate schedule and it took them longer than anyone else in the business to get away from wood cored stringers. High moisture with blistering on the bottom and soft engine stringers would be the two things to look out for.
Love to see documentation on this (excessive chop, high moisture with blistering, etc).

I read surveys as part of the job, and have reviewed a large number of surveys of Bayliners. I've seen nothing that stigmatizes Bayliner from the insurance standpoint. If there were major concerns, actuarials would have that risking built into the insurance tables and resultant premiums would reflect the increased risk.

There is no such concern.
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:38 PM   #39
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I haven't run into any Brokers that had something bad to say about the big Bayliners. The Broker that sold me my Krogen told me that the big Bayliners were the best value around. He did not, by the way, tell me that my Krogen was the best value around, and he was the Broker for the seller, not mine.

Preferring the pilothouse design, if I ever move up in size and particularly if we have a plan to live-aboard, the 45 and 4788 would be on a very short list of candidates for a plethora of reasons.
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Old 09-14-2015, 07:38 PM   #40
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"Here is an illustration of the difference in liferails between a 49' Meridian (Bayliner) and 50' Ocean Alexander in my club. Bayliner is 1", 28" high, small stabilization arm, no rub rail. OA is 1.25", 31" with substantial bulwark, substantial bracing, rub rail."


I agree 100% - there are more than a few Ocean Alexanders about 9 miles north of us in Norwalk Ct and we have spoken top a few owners over the years as we all head back and forth across the sound and run into each other at our ports. Most all the OA's we have seen are very heavily built and have a very robust hull. And as part of that deal they carry much more weight and have a much deeper draft , many have a much taller clearance - I really like the boats and they have different advantages and disadvantages dependent upon desired use from whet we have learned.
I really like the boats build and layout in any case.
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