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Old 02-17-2016, 02:24 PM   #21
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Some yachts need anti collision lights if the mast is tall enough and near a flight path of aircraft.
This one doest look like one but can't really say.
No I doubt that is the case as I'm guessing the highest point would be a red not clear light.??
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Old 02-17-2016, 02:46 PM   #22
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Boat name is Invader so maybe that tells us something.
Ahh Invader. One of my least favourite visitors to the local waters. It came to the north end of Indian Arm last summer, I assume for the peace and quiet, and then opened the garage and winched out jet skis that spent the afternoon screaming around wave jumping. I had always thought the speed restrictions applied to all watercraft, but I guess if you are rich enough...
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Old 02-17-2016, 02:51 PM   #23
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Some yachts need anti collision lights if the mast is tall enough and near a flight path of aircraft.
Now that is a 1st world problem right there folks.
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Old 02-17-2016, 02:59 PM   #24
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Gives me a headache. Like lookin' at a bowl of Smarties in the sky.I thought the same as raymond.goff; anyone who advertises they may run over things needs a wide berth.With so many variations it's easy to misread. By the time you done figgered out what's goin' on it's too late.

That graphic is easy! Restricted in Ability to Maneuver (Red / White / Red). Two side lights (red and green) of course. Two forward masthead lights = Towing. Double red and green show which side the obstruction is on, and which side is safe to pass.

At night, with nothing visible but these lights, I'd know in an instant exactly what was dead ahead of me. Some sort of dredge or other RAM at work. I'd give way (unless I was NUC) and pass on the green side.

In real life, it can be a little more difficult, looking at a different angle, with shore lights and work lights in the picture, but you can still figure out what's going on if you know your lights:
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Old 02-17-2016, 04:58 PM   #25
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No I doubt that is the case as I'm guessing the highest point would be a red not clear light.??
not necessarily as the anchor light is often thought to be the highest and the red lights don't have to be.

So far all reds don't make any sense anyhow.....with a clear pic with accurate color... I probably could offer a decent guess but for now...all those reds don't make a lick of sense other than anticollision.

That type of vessel would never be RAM unless landing a helo. So reds for NUC, and aground would be required....probably never CBD too.
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Old 02-17-2016, 05:01 PM   #26
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The double lights are just built in redundancy, required for commercial (Charter) vessels. They also have a full alarm panel in the pilothouse to indicate when one of those lights goes out.
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Old 02-17-2016, 06:34 PM   #27
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My guess is the mast is too thick to allow the 360 degree lights to show within the allowable obstruction limitations in the NavRules Annex I:

(b) (i) All-round lights shall be so located as not to be obscured by masts,
topmasts or structures within angular sectors of more than 6, except
anchor lights prescribed in Rule 30, which need not be placed at an
impracticable height above the hull.
(ii) If it is impracticable to comply with paragraph (b)(i) of this section by
exhibiting only one all-round light, two all-round lights shall be used
suitably positioned or screened so that they appear, as far as practicable, as
one light at a distance of one mile.
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Old 02-17-2016, 07:18 PM   #28
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Tad has it correct. The one thing not mentioned is the "Fueling" light. Bravo flag (red flag) during daylight hours and all around red after dark while taking or transferring bunkers(fueling)
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Old 02-18-2016, 06:51 AM   #29
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I would assume the multiple lights are to make operation easier.

No needed to know what the legal light system requires if a switch is simply Anchor, or Underway , or Towing., and turns on the correct set of lights.

The switch wiring is easier , with multiple lamps.

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Old 02-19-2016, 09:51 AM   #30
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Tad has it correct. The one thing not mentioned is the "Fueling" light. Bravo flag (red flag) during daylight hours and all around red after dark while taking or transferring bunkers(fueling)
Good point, the red flag and red flashing light are internationally recognized as meaning "transferring hazardous cargo". But I've never seen reference to them in the COLREGs or inland navigation rules. Unless someone can point me to what I'm missing, I suspect they must be in some other regulation, because tankers all use them when loading and unloading.
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Old 02-19-2016, 10:31 AM   #31
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The International Code of Signals (ICS) is an international system of signals and codes for use by vessels to communicate important messages regarding safety of navigation and related matters. Signals can be sent by flaghoist, signal lamp ("blinker"), flag semaphore, radiotelegraphy, and radiotelephony. The International Code is the most recent evolution of a wide variety of maritime flag signalling systems.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intern...ode_of_Signals


Used to see it a lot on vessels for all kinds of messaging...by the time I got out of the USCG...not so much.
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Old 02-19-2016, 11:00 AM   #32
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The doubled ones are interesting. I'm thinking greater intensity though it could simply be backup.
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There is so little vertical separation between the stacked lights it would appear from anly distance to be one light and not two therefore I vote on "back-up" or redundant lights.
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The double lights are just built in redundancy, required for commercial (Charter) vessels. They also have a full alarm panel in the pilothouse to indicate when one of those lights goes out.
Yup, redundancy. It's nice to just flip a switch to an auxiliary bulb when a nav light goes out. Nobody wants to climb up a mast in the middle of the night to change a bulb. The sidelights on the tug I work on don't have this, so when a bulb burns out, somebody has to climb up on top of the pilothouse, 90' up, where there are no railings, to change it. It's a real pain.
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Old 02-19-2016, 12:25 PM   #33
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the original post says all red and all around...not sure where that relates to redundancy of a red nav light...just for aground and NUC....and how often do you need redundancy in those compared to the white and green nav lights?
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Old 02-19-2016, 12:41 PM   #34
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the original post says all red and all around...
She's still sitting in Victoria Harbour and I will be there one day next week so will have another look and do a more thorough inventory.

Binoculars might catch their attention.
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Old 02-19-2016, 12:45 PM   #35
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It would appear that the side lights are on the side in the first pic. Not on the mast.
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Old 02-19-2016, 01:07 PM   #36
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It would appear that the side lights are on the side in the first pic. Not on the mast.
That's correct and there are stacked, forward shining lights, mid mast just above the radar.
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Old 02-19-2016, 01:48 PM   #37
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There are various reasons to carry all around red lights aboard larger vessels. They're supposed to be shown while fueling or transferring dangerous cargo, not under command, aground, restricted by their draft, restricted in their ability to maneuver, engaged in pilotage activity, or fishing commercially.

The all round red light has many uses.
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Old 02-19-2016, 02:34 PM   #38
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The double lights are just built in redundancy, required for commercial (Charter) vessels. They also have a full alarm panel in the pilothouse to indicate when one of those lights goes out.
Can you cite in the COLREGS were redundancy is a requirement?

I don't recall ever seeing or hearing of that.
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Old 02-19-2016, 02:52 PM   #39
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That graphic is easy! Restricted in Ability to Maneuver (Red / White / Red). Two side lights (red and green) of course. Two forward masthead lights = Towing. Double red and green show which side the obstruction is on, and which side is safe to pass.

At night, with nothing visible but these lights, I'd know in an instant exactly what was dead ahead of me. Some sort of dredge or other RAM at work. I'd give way (unless I was NUC) and pass on the green side.

In real life, it can be a little more difficult, looking at a different angle, with shore lights and work lights in the picture, but you can still figure out what's going on if you know your lights:
I though the double masthead lights indicate it's over a certain length?

But I would agree with the summary.
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Old 02-19-2016, 02:56 PM   #40
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I though the double masthead lights indicate it's over a certain length?

But I would agree with the summary.
trip whites are tows over 200m, 2 in a row is just towing with tow vessel less than 50m


plus the dredge lights above probably don't signify towing...they are just a forward and aft masthead denoting greater than 50m in length and underway....would be silly to display towing lights on an active dredge as it aint going anywhere fast and is already RAM.... page 94 USCG NAVRULES ...
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