View Poll Results: Teak or not?
I love teak. Want it on my boat. Yes Yes Yes 11 18.97%
I lean toward teak but not having it wouldn't make me not buy 12 20.69%
I'm completely neutral on teak. Can take it or leave it. I'm the Switzerland of Teak Opinion 4 6.90%
I lean away from teak but just because a boat has it doesn't mean I won't buy it. 16 27.59%
I hate teak. Never ever ever ever want a boat with it. No No No 15 25.86%
Voters: 58. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 02-15-2016, 07:24 PM   #21
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Joy and I just discussed this prior to me posting . I voted for teak . She brought up a good point . If we can start with new teak and maintain it from the beginning it's a yes yes for us . Old teak that has been neglected and needing restored , it depends on how bad it is . But we are under cover and just doing some sissy boating compared to most of you . Being a wood worker if it's too far gone it's easier for me to replace and varnish before the hardware goes on . It helps that I can get a decent price on teak .
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Old 02-15-2016, 07:35 PM   #22
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Old 02-15-2016, 07:36 PM   #23
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Wifey B: I really expected far less support for teak. Shocked that it's been relatively balanced as I had the impression it was generally disliked here.
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Old 02-15-2016, 07:40 PM   #24
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I suspect teak is liked, the work involved not so much. It helps if you have the time to spare and find the work a bit therapeutic
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Old 02-15-2016, 07:43 PM   #25
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I suspect teak is liked, the work involved not so much. It helps if you have the time to spare and find the work a bit therapeutic

Yes.
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Old 02-15-2016, 10:25 PM   #26
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My cap rail is fiberglass. Wash and wax like the rest of the boat. No special care needed. Click image for larger version

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Old 02-15-2016, 10:30 PM   #27
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1.25-inch-diameter stainless steel makes for a fine grasp.

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Old 02-15-2016, 10:42 PM   #28
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Nice rails Mark.

And nice scuppers, green fenders, green lines, yellow roof, chrome horns and running light blinders. The white fender lines look tacky though. I can say that as mine are white. You should switch to black cuse they stand out against the dark green. Just mumbling Mark.
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Old 02-15-2016, 11:18 PM   #29
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Eric, the fenders and their lines are brought aboard when underway, so not so tacky.
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Old 02-15-2016, 11:21 PM   #30
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Whether to teak or not. That is the question.

Al depends upon how much $$$$ a person has to spend.

It seems the more $ the more shine a boat has.

Personally, I don't have the resources to pay a yard crew to maintain bright work. And I certainly don't have the time to do it myself.

No and limited. Oil is better than polyurethane. (Except on the teak and holly)
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Old 02-16-2016, 03:53 AM   #31
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30 year old teak decks scare me, but I certainly would consider a boat with a new teak deck, especially if it was layed without using 1000 screws.
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Old 02-16-2016, 07:28 AM   #32
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Had teak cap rail and aft deck. Now have bare foot friendly non skid fiberglass deck and hand friendly epoxy encapsulated cap rail with Awlgrip finish. For me, the finished products far exceeded the expectation. From a bling stand point I understand the wood. From a user stand point (walk on and hold), there is no comparison.

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Old 02-16-2016, 10:08 AM   #33
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I like seeing well maintained teak






on somebody else's boat.
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:30 AM   #34
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Wifey: Darn, I should have noted exterior....that's where the maintenance is. Honestly, we don't find it's that much to maintain though.

Figured that's what you meant.

Would have been good to have a choice about teak on someone else's boat... where it can look nice and be essentially maintenance free (for me).



Every year I watch our dock neighbors sand and re-stain/re-varnish (oil, whatever) their brightwork. It appears to be light touchup one year, more serious work then next. Either way, what a chore.

Looks nice -- on their boat, once they do the work -- but it sometimes looks like crap in between those work sessions... and anyway, I'm not doin' that.

Luckily they don't have teak decks...

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Old 02-16-2016, 10:35 AM   #35
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I have never had the luxury of having such a perfect boat that all was left to do was keep teak nice.
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Old 02-16-2016, 10:44 AM   #36
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But here in Washington w covered moorage I like it.
But not decks. It's too yachty anyway.
I don't think there is anyone on the planet who would not prefer to have exterior wood if it cost the same and were zero maintenance.

Wood - varnished, oiled, whatever - is very low maintenance if the boat is predominantly stored under cover.
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Old 02-16-2016, 11:48 AM   #37
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Wifey B: I'm reading all about oiling, varnishing, all these things. We simply clean with TDS products and the color remains/is restored. Not multi step or multi products. Now, we do have the advantage of doing this from the day it was new. But TDS's cleaners do what others seem to be working much harder to do. It's pretty much like a good mopping but just using a special cleaner. It takes a little longer than mopping a deck because you want to be sure to go against the grain and you use a smaller brush, plus you're more careful to keep the area wet while working and to rinse it very well as soon as done.

Here is a video of how we care for our teak.

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Old 02-16-2016, 12:03 PM   #38
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Wifey B: I'm reading all about oiling, varnishing, all these things. We simply clean with TDS products and the color remains/is restored. Not multi step or multi products. Now, we do have the advantage of doing this from the day it was new. But TDS's cleaners do what others seem to be working much harder to do. It's pretty much like a good mopping but just using a special cleaner. It takes a little longer than mopping a deck because you want to be sure to go against the grain and you use a smaller brush, plus you're more careful to keep the area wet while working and to rinse it very well as soon as done.
Looked like he was doing a fair amount of scrubbing.

Simple question: What percentage of all the maintenance are you doing to all of the teak decks on your boat?

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Old 02-16-2016, 12:26 PM   #39
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Looked like he was doing a fair amount of scrubbing.

Simple question: What percentage of all the maintenance are you doing to all of the teak decks on your boat?

Ted
Wifey B: What percentage am I doing? 5.12778346%. At one time I did 50% on a boat we owned but it was small and limited teak. I have done 50% though more recently to learn and to really understand. Hubby and I did it. He sure has lousy control of the hose. Everytime he went to rinse I got soaked, especially from the waist up.

Yes, the video had some scrubbing. So does fiberglass deck. Do does tile. So does carpet. I'm not saying it's work free, but I'm not saying any deck is. I'm simply saying that properly maintained teak doesn't require the effort that many are having to put in on teak that hasn't apparently been maintained as well. There are also many other things that are as much or more effort to maintain. All the deck furniture. Canvas and strataglass. Carpet when someone spills pink champagne.

I'd say our teak is 10-20% incrementally more work to maintain than fiberglass decks.
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Old 02-16-2016, 12:45 PM   #40
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Wifey B: What percentage am I doing? 5.12778346%. At one time I did 50% on a boat we owned but it was small and limited teak. I have done 50% though more recently to learn and to really understand. Hubby and I did it. He sure has lousy control of the hose. Everytime he went to rinse I got soaked, especially from the waist up.

Yes, the video had some scrubbing. So does fiberglass deck. Do does tile. So does carpet. I'm not saying it's work free, but I'm not saying any deck is. I'm simply saying that properly maintained teak doesn't require the effort that many are having to put in on teak that hasn't apparently been maintained as well. There are also many other things that are as much or more effort to maintain. All the deck furniture. Canvas and strataglass. Carpet when someone spills pink champagne.

I'd say our teak is 10-20% incrementally more work to maintain than fiberglass decks.
Fair enough.

Not sure how old the boat is that you are maintaining, but clearly the work required increases as the teak deck ages. Most here aren't starting with a new teak deck and their experience is with 10 to 30 year old teak and possibly poorly done applications. Failure of the application may take more than a decade to materialize.

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