Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-13-2019, 04:05 PM   #1
Newbie
 
City: Florence, SC
Country: United States
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 2
When is it too old?

High ya everyone, new guy here. I've been on Yacht World for awhile and when I look at Hatteras, Viking, Chris Craft there are listings for hulls that can go back to the 60's or further. So my question is when is it to old? I know the older a boat the more questions to ask and really go over the boat with the surveyors. I've seen older boats that could be diamonds in the rough...just as long as they don't turn into a money pit. What do y'all think?
__________________
Advertisement

Aboatguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 04:10 PM   #2
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,006
When it’s not in good condition.
When parts for equipment is no longer available.
And if your extremely style conscious .. not your style.
When the cost of repair exceeds the value otherwise.

Condition condition condition
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 04:19 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
City: Rochester, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 314
I'll agree with Willy. It's too old when it's worn out beyond reasonable repair or restoration or when you'd have to replace basically everything due to unavailable parts.
rslifkin is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 05:13 PM   #4
Guru
 
sbu22's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: US
Vessel Name: Panache
Vessel Model: Viking 43 Double Cabin '76
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,113
What Eric said. My 76 Viking is built like a tank. For the most part, parts are not an issue.

I'm lucky in that Viking is still family owned, takes a real interest in their legacy boats, and must be a great place to work - up until a few years ago, I could call New Gretna and talk to the project manager who built my boat.

"Money pit" ia a relative term. I've spent quite a few bucks fixing/upgrading, although I do the grunt work myself. On the other hand, I bought her 11 years ago for the price of a tricked out pickup truck.The last time I looked, a new 43' Viking cost north of $1.3. My oldie floats as well as the new ones.

I will say that I probably derive as much enjoyment from working on her as I do running her. If you're going to "have" work done rather than DIY, that should factor into the fiscal consideration.

Irrespective of age, a recreational boat is a depreciating asset. My theory is that you buy a an old boat in "good" condition with the depreciation wrung out of it, spend a few bucks, and you're on the water the same as the big buck guys.

One big caveat, Aboat - not knowing your experience level and expertise - unless you really know what you're doing, I wouldn't advise considering a wooden boat.
sbu22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 05:27 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Pete Meisinger's Avatar
 
City: Marinette, WI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Best Alternative
Vessel Model: 36 Albin Aft Cabin
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 152
Personally, I would not get involved with a fiberglass boat built before the early 70's. From the mid 70's they were built like tanks, way more glass than they really needed. Before that time the builders really didn't understand a lot about glass.

Wood, on the other hand, I would easily consider boats build by quality manufacturers clear back to the early 60's. With the proviso that they had been totally restored or really, really kept up on with the maintenance, wood and mechanical. Lots of gassers in the early 60's which are probably ready to become liabilities unless they have been changed out or recently rebuilt.

The earlier glass boats are disappearing. Price is generally right but get a survey.

pete

Metal,including aluminum, I think mostly depends on fresh or salt water and regardless of age, I would have the metal tested.

Concrete ? Some nice heavy sailboats out there. Very, very cheap. It just does not hold its value, even nearly new.
Pete Meisinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 05:31 PM   #6
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 5,529
I would not be afraid of of a glass boat from the 70s or even the 60s if it surveyed well. The possible problems are insurance and financing if needed. Many financial institutions will not finance something that old and insurance may be more difficult to get. Check on both before you make an offer.
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 07:10 PM   #7
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 5,195
Speaking for Hatteras and Viking, you see a lot of very nice old ones because they are 1) very well designed and built boats and 2) they are still supported by the makers. I can speak to Hatteras specifically that their parts department spin-off, Sam's Marine, is an invaluable resource of knowledge and solutions. You register your hull number with them and they will know exactly what your boat came equipped with. Hatteras can send you a detailed "as built" summary for your specific boat as it left the factory, as well as sell you comprehensive owners manuals and schematics from microfiche. So it easy for an owner to keep a boat in as pristine condition as their bank account will allow.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 07:38 PM   #8
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 7,509
After a few years, for the most part, it depends on how previous owners took care of it or didn't. I have seen several <10 year old boats that aren't worth 25% of regular market value because owners have ruined engines due to driving habits and lack of maintenance, did no exterior maintenance, and basically treated the interior like white trash in a trailer park. Lots of great value in old boat that were well maintained. I guess the only thing that would stop me from buying a cherry from before the '80s would be if I couldn't at least get liability insurance.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 08:27 PM   #9
Guru
 
Jeff F's Avatar
 
City: Great Lakes
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Mazurka
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 Original
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 595
Lots of good advice here.

Boat ageism is rampant, and I understand why it happens. But there are usually ways around it.

I just arrived in Toronto aboard my 1978 boat and am seeking a liveaboard slip for the winter. I called one marina, and all seemed fine until the question on my boat age. Then the conversation stopped. No boats from the seventies allowed. No exceptions.

I approached the next marina - the one I really wanted to stay in - by boat. Drove deep into the marina and docked in front of the harbourmaster's office. Came out with an offer of a slip. The boat age never came up :-)
Jeff F is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 09:08 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
City: Lutz
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 433
old agey boaty

My last 2 boats were early eighties built. Each one took years to fix the deteriorated and outmoded stuff. It would have been much better to buy 10 years newer. I would have been much ahead both in time and money.
geoleo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 09:15 PM   #11
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,746
One thing I am finding out is that insurance companies are starting to refuse insuring boats older than 27 years. It can still be done, but coverage is getting harder to find.
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2019, 10:14 PM   #12
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 5,529
Ours is 32 years old and Boat/US doesnít have any problems so far...
__________________
Boat Nut:
If you are one there is no explanation necessary.
If you arenít one, there is no explanation possible.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 05:20 AM   #13
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 19,657
The earliest US boats were built not like tanks , but like radar domes. Many many layers of cloth to get to the thickness desired.

Glass and resin were cheap , 17c a pound for resin , so until the 6 day war thick was no problem.

Thick is heavy but on a displacement hull almost meaningless , an extra ton of hull should only cost 1/5 of a GPH , no big deal.

After the oil crisis resin shot up to about 75c a pound , and blisters became common.

A really old boat should be stiff enough to almost never flex , the key on any GRP boat to a long life.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 08:02 AM   #14
Guru
 
TDunn's Avatar
 
City: Maine Coast
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Tortuga
Vessel Model: Nunes Brothers Raised Deck Cruiser
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 858
My boat was built in 1936. That is one of the reasons I bought it. I have had no problem insuring it with an agreed value policy.
TDunn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 09:12 AM   #15
Guru
 
ranger42c's Avatar
 
City: Maryland
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 42' Sportfish
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 4,600
I don't necessarily use age in years as a limiter; I tend to draw the line at specific features I'd like to avoid (e.g., 32V DC systems, ladders instead of stairs).

Not that those features are unworkable, just not for us (ladders) or I just don't want to fool with it (32V).

-Chris
__________________
South River, Chesapeake Bay
ranger42c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 09:17 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Capitaine R's Avatar
 
City: St James City/Punta Gorda
Country: U.S.A.
Vessel Name: Charlie Noble
Vessel Model: 32 Nordic Tug
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 286
Our NT is an 86 and we have it insured thru the same insurer as our homes.
__________________
The best way to find out is get her out on the ocean, because if anything is going to happen it's going to happen out there.
"Captain Ron"
Capitaine R is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 11:27 AM   #17
Guru
 
78puget-trawler's Avatar
 
City: LaConner
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 34' CHB
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 1,073
My '78 CHB is 41 and insured with Safeco.
78puget-trawler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 05:22 PM   #18
Guru
 
City: Anacortes
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 762
1980 Tollycraft and still have it insured with Chubb. Probably too expensive of an insurer at this point, but they have a really good policy, really good to deal with the one time I had to file a claim and after 14 years, I just like to patronize somebody who proved themselves a good company to partner with all these years.
ghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 05:38 PM   #19
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 5,195
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
I don't necessarily use age in years as a limiter; I tend to draw the line at specific features I'd like to avoid (e.g., 32V DC systems, ladders instead of stairs).

Not that those features are unworkable, just not for us (ladders) or I just don't want to fool with it (32V).

-Chris
32V is no big deal at all. Having owned an old Hatteras, I can assure you of that.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2019, 05:58 PM   #20
Guru
 
Lepke's Avatar
 
City: Between Oregon and Alaska
Country: US
Vessel Name: Charlie Harper
Vessel Model: Wheeler Shipyard 83'
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,558
Boat age depends on how fussy you are, the money you want to spend, the repairs you're willing to make, who you want to impress, where & how you want to use the boat, and what you expect for resale.
I have a 1942 wood boat I liveaboard in the PNW. I'm in my 70s, so except for tenders, it's my last boat. I have no problem getting insurance. I have a private dock and in the rare instance I stay at a marina, I've never been asked for my insurance or questioned about the boat age. In fact, I've been approached by a couple marinas that would like to have an 83' boat at their marina (for too much money). My only concern about resale is the boat lasts as long as I do. If the value is zero at my end time, I don't care.



__________________

Lepke is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:05 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×