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Old 06-23-2016, 02:02 PM   #1
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When did anchoring become so complicated?

I have been anchoring in many boats, sail and power for a long time and always considered it the most pleasant way to stop for the night. Put it down, back down on it to make sure it holds then your are done. If it doesn't set move to a different place or use a different anchor if you have one. Most of the time all is well.

Reading posts recently it seems that the more high tech the anchors become the more trepidation attaches to anchoring.

My only answer is that people don't drop the hook often enough to realize it is simple and not fearful but quite enjoyable to just stop where you are and relax.
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Old 06-23-2016, 02:49 PM   #2
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I think a big part of the problem is Mfg that want big bucks for a little bit of steel.

So they advertise their " wonder super wow " 13lbs is good for a 50 ft boat.

A good sized anchor , the biggest that will fit in the bow roller , usually will do a job the expensive watch fob wont.

Give you a good nights sleep.
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Old 06-23-2016, 03:00 PM   #3
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bayview,
What a great post.
But the better anchors are actually making it even simpler and closer to bullet proof. At times of course it is'nt but most all the time any one of my anchors will do fine and plunk and pull a bit will work great too.
It's really great to be reminded of that.
But it is good to remember the bottom is the biggest variable.
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Old 06-23-2016, 03:09 PM   #4
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Someone here posted an anchoring experience where, "The winds changed from a roaring freight train to a screaming Banshee".

That's in the back of everyone's mind, I believe, when they keep coming back to the subject. Will their gear hold?
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Old 06-23-2016, 03:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post
Someone here posted an anchoring experience where, "The winds changed from a roaring freight train to a screaming Banshee".

That's in the back of everyone's mind, I believe, when they keep coming back to the subject. Will their gear hold?
Yup. There are some places where I could just dump my chain rode and the boat won't go anywhere without an anchor. However, when weather comes up, I want my anchor to hold well.

Another point is that boaters are often moving up in size. I know my own experience over the years with anchoring went from sailboats starting at 21', to 24', to 29', to 36', to 40', and now to a power boat at 43'. Each of those jumps put more demand on the ground tackle I was using and making sure it was set properly became more important. No longer am I contend to toss a small Danforth over the side with a bit of nylon line like I was with the 21' sailboat.

It isn't rocket science, but I like to do what I do reasonably well. I don't have to be perfect, but I like to do things "properly" if I can. I think many others are the same. If it is worth doing it is worth doing well and so on...
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Old 06-23-2016, 03:41 PM   #6
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It is a simple process IMO. I use an "old time" anchor (Danforth) and never had any trouble to speak of. Drop, lightly set, secure snubber, shut down engine, have a beer.
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Old 06-23-2016, 05:37 PM   #7
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It is a simple process IMO. I use an "old time" anchor (Danforth) and never had any trouble to speak of. Drop, lightly set, secure snubber, shut down engine, have a beer.
In that order?
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Old 06-23-2016, 05:39 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayview View Post
I have been anchoring in many boats, sail and power for a long time and always considered it the most pleasant way to stop for the night. Put it down, back down on it to make sure it holds then your are done. If it doesn't set move to a different place or use a different anchor if you have one. Most of the time all is well.

Reading posts recently it seems that the more high tech the anchors become the more trepidation attaches to anchoring.

My only answer is that people don't drop the hook often enough to realize it is simple and not fearful but quite enjoyable to just stop where you are and relax.
anchoring became more complicated for me the first time I woke up and found myself on the beach
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Old 06-23-2016, 05:40 PM   #9
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The complication came when armchair experts began espousing their wares of knowledge on forums. And the complication isnt how to anchor but how to sift through all the espoused wares.
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Old 06-23-2016, 06:27 PM   #10
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20 years ago we had the CQR, Delta, Bruce and the Danforth types. Today we have Manson, Rocnas and more exotic types that set easier and hold better.


The tests by Panope cut through the BS of marketing hype and the prejudice of zealous owners and gives us practical information that we can use to select a modern, high performance anchor.


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Old 06-23-2016, 09:50 PM   #11
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It seems odd to complain about too much new technology in anchoring in a high-tech forum that didn't exist more than a handful of years ago. It's like saying that you don't need to post your thoughts here because you could have just used CompuServe's BBS instead at 2400 baud - it was just as good.

Anchor technology has leaped in the last 10 years. If you don't want to make the leap, that's fine. I just hope you anchor behind me than in front of me...
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Old 06-23-2016, 10:07 PM   #12
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I wonder if part of the caution / concern one sees in these kind of threads has to do with the increased size and value of our vessels over what we may have had in the past. While I care about all my boats, I obsess about the trawler more. Having good insurance doesn't seem to ease the OCD. While I do sleep well at night because of an over sized anchor and all chain, haven't reach the comfort level of less than 7:1 scope.

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Old 06-23-2016, 10:18 PM   #13
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Hey Jeffrey, Nice new boat!!
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Old 06-23-2016, 11:46 PM   #14
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Hey Jeffrey, Nice new boat!!
Is it you present vessel now Jeff, or just one you like so put in your avatar, as you have not changed the boat in your profile from the De Fever..?
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Old 06-23-2016, 11:51 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayview View Post
I have been anchoring in many boats, sail and power for a long time and always considered it the most pleasant way to stop for the night. Put it down, back down on it to make sure it holds then your are done. If it doesn't set move to a different place or use a different anchor if you have one. Most of the time all is well.

Reading posts recently it seems that the more high tech the anchors become the more trepidation attaches to anchoring.

My only answer is that people don't drop the hook often enough to realize it is simple and not fearful but quite enjoyable to just stop where you are and relax.
Yes, and darn good post, as others have also said. Sometimes we forget that with today's good weather forecasts, common sense, and a reasonably decent anchor, it should really be as you say 99% of the time, and it is only the 1% of unexpected adversity that need give rise to anyone to question their gear.

However, as several have pointed out, progress happens, whether we like it or not, so to get the most fun out of it, to quote those old banjo-pickin' fellows..."just jump in, and ha-yang aawn...
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Old 06-24-2016, 08:26 AM   #16
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been anchoring a 21' Dovekie, then a 28' Shearwater Yawl, then a - - -

Albin-25 for a total of 35 years using Bruce anchors generously sized for those boats and have never had a problem on all sorts of bottoms.

I hold media "anchor tests" suspect because they simplify the bottom variables, and may not be comparing apples to apples when it comes to anchor size/boat displacement specifications. I say that because if you compare the specs in anchor sales brochures they do not progress exactly alike, foot by foot and lb for lb.

I certainly see no reason to invest in an expensive new anchor when the Bruce works so well. BTW the Dovekie and Shearwater were outfitted by Edey & Duff when built. They could easily have installed much cheaper Danforth knock-offs. The Albin came to us with a Danforth, and we switched to a Claw (Bruce knock-off) quickly.
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Old 06-24-2016, 08:35 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bayview View Post
I have been anchoring in many boats, sail and power for a long time and always considered it the most pleasant way to stop for the night. Put it down, back down on it to make sure it holds then your are done. If it doesn't set move to a different place or use a different anchor if you have one. Most of the time all is well.

Reading posts recently it seems that the more high tech the anchors become the more trepidation attaches to anchoring.

My only answer is that people don't drop the hook often enough to realize it is simple and not fearful but quite enjoyable to just stop where you are and relax.
When you must market an expensive item that costs double of possible replacements, the buyer must justify the extra cost.

Therefore:
1. make the process sound complicated,
2. put out videos and tests that may look scientific, but are anything but, and
3. recommend weights and scope so heavy and long that any anchor will be successful.

That's what Product Managers are paid for.
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Old 06-24-2016, 08:51 AM   #18
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When did anchoring become so complicated?

It hasn't - Anchoring is rather simple/easy... If you know what you're doing.

Similar to docking, cruising, boat-maintenance... etc - all of which are rather simple/easy... If you know what you're doing.

Each topic offers broad opportunity to chat on boating forums trying to learn best way to do "IT", or, trying to explain best way to do "IT"... whatever the subject/case may be.

Happy Marine-Doings Daze! - Art

PS: Anchoring is compilation of rules of physics... basically, either you have innate understanding, learned understanding, or follow the guidelines understanding of physics rules that relate to anchoring - or you don't.
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Old 06-24-2016, 08:55 AM   #19
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It isn't rocket science, but I like to do what I do reasonably well. I don't have to be perfect, but I like to do things "properly" if I can. I think many others are the same. If it is worth doing it is worth doing well and so on...
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Old 06-24-2016, 10:03 AM   #20
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The anchoring debate seems to be everywhere, I had a guy walking the dock a few years back give me crap for " still using a Bruce when there are way better anchors available" speech. This was just some schmuck visiting the marina and I was working on the bow of the boat so I guess I was a easy target.
He was rather passionate and resolute in his reasoning for me to toss my perfectly good working oversized original Bruce.. the one that I had anchored with A LOT in the almost 10 previous years.. without fail.

He was almost as convincing as a Priest would be talking to a hooker about the wicked ways of her profession and the reasons to follow the straight and narrow path.

He quickly found out he had decided to preach to the wrong seemingly unenlightened mariner on the wrong day.

The key to ANY anchor is to know what it can and cannot do.. learn to set it right.. and to do it often.

As a side note.. I currently have a again oversized Delta that I really like and I have absolutely no plans to swap it out for the latest whatever anchor.
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