Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-10-2012, 10:43 AM   #1
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
Whats it called

The forward slanting windshield on the fly bridge.

SD
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 11:00 AM   #2
Veteran Member
 
Formosa's Avatar
 
City: Campbell River, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Levada
Vessel Model: 1983 Formosa 42 Europa
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 55
It is popularly called a Venturi windshield, I think.
__________________

__________________
Joe
Formosa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 11:06 AM   #3
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
Any idea why?
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 12:34 PM   #4
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
I call them "wannabe windows" since when they are applied to toy boats like ours they are like putting racing stripes on a Fiat 500---- pointless but trying to look like the "big boys."

The sloped-forward panels (usually transparent) on the front of flying bridges on most boat are called "venturi panels" because (I believe) of the effect they have on the wind. While I don't believe the panels actually act as a true venturi, which accelerates air by constricting its flow-- like the throat of a carburetor--they may do something to the airflow that acts a bit like a venturi. Basically, they deflect the air as well as cause it to flow up and over the flying bridge or at least the forward part of it.

The forward-sloped pilothouse windows are not so much for air deflection as they are for glare reduction and wave and spray deflection. They make sense on boat/ships that encounter heavy seas and take green water or extremely heavy slugs of spray over the bow because the water hitting the windshield dead on or on a descending arc will be deflected downward and the impact against the glass will be reduced. Why the term "venturi " would be applied to them I don't know unless it's because they mirror the venturi panels on flying bridges.

On 8-knot coastal cruisers like many of our boats are, I think they simply look ugly and stupid. Hence, "wannabe windows."
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 12:54 PM   #5
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Those overhanging pilot windows help shade the interior, reduce night-time reflections, and increase interior volume, let alone help deflect heavy water showers when heading into the in the choppy SF estuary. Don't consider such windows merely decorative.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 01:09 PM   #6
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 511
Are u (OP) asking about forward cabin windows or the little freestanding plexi on the forward edge of the flybridge?
__________________
TIME well wasted
34' Mainship III
Cape Coral, FL
twiisted71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 01:12 PM   #7
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Those overhanging pilot windows help shade the interior, reduce night-time reflections, and increase interior volume, let alone help deflect heavy water showers when heading into the in the choppy SF estuary. Don't consider such windows merely decorative.
Somehow I think the spray your boat kicks up on the bay there is not posing any sort of danger to your windows even if they were vertical or sloped back. I suppose if you walked around on the cabin overhead the forward sloped windows would give you more space. Since you don't, they don't.

Sorry, strictly my opinion of course, but I think that on recreational boats like ours, particularly coastal cruisers, they just look stupid as well as ruining the lines of the boat. Vertical windows can look great on the right design, and of course slanted back windows always contribute to nice lines. But while I understand the reasoning behind the so-called venturi windows on boats that encounter heavy weather, be it an RNLI rescue boat or a freigher, they are still ugly in my view. But in those applications they at least have a purpose that over-rides their appearance.

Not so on little toy boats that muck around in nice weather on inland and coastal waters.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 01:41 PM   #8
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by twiisted71 View Post
Are u (OP) asking about forward cabin windows or the little freestanding plexi on the forward edge of the flybridge?
Yeah that is it the plexi ones on the fly bridge.

A quriosity for names of things on a boat and a bit of lore on how it came to be called such.

SD
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 03:15 PM   #9
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Somehow I think the spray your boat kicks up on the bay there is not posing any sort of danger to your windows even if they were vertical or sloped back. I suppose if you walked around on the cabin overhead the forward sloped windows would give you more space. Since you don't, they don't.

Sorry, strictly my opinion of course, but I think that on recreational boats like ours, particularly coastal cruisers, they just look stupid as well as ruining the lines of the boat. Vertical windows can look great on the right design, and of course slanted back windows always contribute to nice lines. But while I understand the reasoning behind the so-called venturi windows on boats that encounter heavy weather, be it an RNLI rescue boat or a freigher, they are still ugly in my view. But in those applications they at least have a purpose that over-rides their appearance.

Not so on little toy boats that muck around in nice weather on inland and coastal waters.
While I agree with a helluva lot of what you post.....I run dozens of commecial boats every year and the forward slanting windows are the ticket almost all the time...despite their appearance. To me, if done right...the elimination or reduction of glare both day and night are worth the ugliest boat in the world. Now...maybe a lot are done wrong...but if right get my thumbs up!!!

Anyway..I think SD was just asking about the 8 inches or so of plexi that deflect a little wind up and over the flybridge helsmen....
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 03:25 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
magicbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
... On 8-knot coastal cruisers like many of our boats are, I think they simply look ugly and stupid. Hence, "wannabe windows."
Since the the forward-leaning pilot house windows provide a number of benefits this soulds like a clear case of "window envy".

Dave
__________________
Barnegat Light NJ or Nantucket MA
magicbus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 03:29 PM   #11
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicbus View Post
Since the the forward-leaning pilot house windows provide a number of benefits this soulds like a clear case of "window envy".

Dave
I can relate...can't change the angle of my windows just yet...and am replacing all of them due to leaks and general deterioration...maybe I'll just leave the front ones out and get really good sunglass cleaner for my sunglasses...
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 03:42 PM   #12
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicbus View Post
Since the the forward-leaning pilot house windows provide a number of benefits this soulds like a clear case of "window envy".

Dave

Not a chance. To me they totally destroy the look and lines of every boat I've seen them on. I absolutely agree with psneeld as to their value on boats whose operation requires this kind of window, but that doesn't change the fact they are one of the most butt-ugly things (in my opinon) in the boating design world.

We have a deep enough flying bridge overhang on our boat to make glare a non-issue, we don't boat at night because of all the crap in the water around here, and we don't boat on the open ocean where big slugs of water over the bow into the pilothouse windows are a potential problem. So wannabe windows have zero value to us or our boating.

An American Tug would be a decent looking boat if it wasn't for those ridiculous pilothouse windows. That feature alone would keep us from buying one if we were in the market for that kind of boat. Aesthetics are important to both me and my wife, and that single feature totally wipes out any aesthetic value the rest of the American Tug might have as far as we're concerned.

For the kind of boating we do and the waters we do it in, I wouldn't be caught dead driving a recreational boat with wannabe windows. Their ugliness would simply be too embarrassing to tolerate. Be sort of like driving around in a Yugo or a Trabant.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 03:52 PM   #13
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Not a chance. To me they totally destroy the look and lines of every boat I've seen them on. I absolutely agree with psneeld as to their value on boats whose operation requires this kind of window, but that doesn't change the fact they are one of the most butt-ugly things (in my opinon) in the boating design world.

We have a deep enough flying bridge overhang on our boat to make glare a non-issue, we don't boat at night because of all the crap in the water around here, and we don't boat on the open ocean where big slugs of water over the bow into the pilothouse windows are a potential problem. So wannabe windows have zero value to us or our boating.

An American Tug would be a decent looking boat if it wasn't for those ridiculous pilothouse windows. That feature alone would keep us from buying one if we were in the market for that kind of boat. Aesthetics are important to both me and my wife, and that single feature totally wipes out any aesthetic value the rest of the American Tug might have as far as we're concerned.

For the kind of boating we do and the waters we do it in, I wouldn't be caught dead driving a recreational boat with wannabe windows. Their ugliness would simply be too embarrassing to tolerate. Be sort of like driving around in a Yugo or a Trabant.
I gotta respect your enthusiasm for what you like and don't like!
But I really gotta tell ya ....the perfect pilothouse is a thing of beauty and as rare as a cold beer on Mars. When it come close...I'd trade that beer (and that's saying A LOT) to enjoy those moments piloting a boat with damn near unlimited visibility and not even a ghost of window reflection....at night...I'd be willing to kill for it...
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:03 PM   #14
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
....at night...I'd be willing to kill for it...
I can totally agree with that position. If we boated at night we might be persuaded to accept wannabe windows if glare would be a significant problem if our boat's helm station had vertical or slanted-back windows.

But we very rarely are out after the sun goes down so we don't have to compromise our sense of aesthetics and drive a butt-ugly boat because reducing glare has become more important than driving a nice looking boat.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:26 PM   #15
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
drive a butt-ugly boat because reducing glare has become more important than driving a nice looking boat.[/QUOTE]

Hey I represent that remark
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20080622111339(1).JPG
Views:	111
Size:	44.1 KB
ID:	11894  
Attached Images
 
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:28 PM   #16
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
I can totally agree with that position. If we boated at night we might be persuaded to accept wannabe windows if glare would be a significant problem if our boat's helm station had vertical or slanted-back windows.

But we very rarely are out after the sun goes down so we don't have to compromise our sense of aesthetics and drive a butt-ugly boat because reducing glare has become more important than driving a nice looking boat.
After years of driving commercial craft, flying HH52A helicopters for 8 years and shaving every day for the last 45 years...butt ugly is tolerable!
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:28 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
magicbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 460
I guess what with beauty being in the eye of the beholder it's a good thing they make different boats for different folks!

Dave
__________________
Barnegat Light NJ or Nantucket MA
magicbus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:31 PM   #18
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicbus View Post
I guess what with beauty being in the eye of the beholder it's a good thing they make different boats for different folks!

Dave
There you go.
__________________
If you can't repair it maybe it shouldn't be on the boat
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:35 PM   #19
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Quote:
Originally Posted by magicbus View Post
I guess what with beauty being in the eye of the beholder it's a good thing they make different boats for different folks!

Dave

That would be a great looking boat if they'd correct that mistake with the pilothouse windows. Perhaps they'll get it right on the next model....

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2012, 04:41 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
magicbus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 460
I'll drop a note to the designer for his next model!

Dave
__________________

__________________
Barnegat Light NJ or Nantucket MA
magicbus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012