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Old 07-10-2012, 04:47 PM   #21
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they call them portaquess windows, i cant spell,they came out with them years ago on all there comm.boats
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Old 07-10-2012, 05:14 PM   #22
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I'm saying "Reverse Raked" windows.
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Old 07-10-2012, 08:25 PM   #23
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I'll drop a note to the designer for his next model!

Dave
But you're right, beauty is most definitely in the eyes of the beholder. In about 1996 when my wife and I started our second decade of flying the Inside Passage in floatplanes we began to contemplate the idea of getting some sort of larger boat to explore the same area by water. Grand Banks was not even on our list of potential candidates. I thought they were stodgy, unimaginitive, uninspiring designs (I still do) and up here every time you turn around you trip over one. They're like Hondas--- you see yourself coming and going every time you're out in one. At least Hondas come in different colors......

And we had no interest in what I call the cabin-cruiser boats either--- Uniflite, Tollycraft, Bayliner, Carver, etc.

We did not want to spend a lot of money on a cruising boat---- we have other pastimes that make owning a boat seem cheap by comparison and we weren't going to give any of them up. We would simply be adding the cruising boat to the mix.

The boat that topped our list of desirable possibilities was the Lord Nelson Victory Tug. We wanted a boat that is to the water what the Beaver we fly is to the air--- rugged, somewhat utilitarian and work oriented, able to deal with the situations we felt we were likely to encounter, and so on.

Problem was Victory Tugs at the time were too new for used ones to be in the range of what we were willing to spend, plus I'm not a fan of the engines they were using in the earlier ones.

But in talking about potential boats to good friends who'd made careers in the marine industry the name Grand Banks kept coming up. I'd say, "But they're just a giant yawn with a hull," but our friends would go on about how well built they were and so on.

Then a friend I fly with sometimes and who now owns the same boat that his dad bought some fifty years ago suggested that we charter a cruising boat for a week to see if we even liked this kind of boating. And another friend, the then-head of engineering for Alaska Diesel Electric (today's Northern Lights/Lugger) suggested a charter company owned by a friend of his up in Bellingham that had a large fleet of GBs. So we did.

While our opinon of the GBs aesthetics, or lack of them, didn't change we found that the GB36 was indeed well built, had a layout we liked, had a one-level, wide-ish walk-around main deck--- something we would never be without now in any boat---- was easy to handle, and had wonderful visibility out of those big windows I disliked the look of so much.

And when we found out that the early fiberglass models could be bought for between a song and a song and a half (and still can be), we decided that if we were going to get into this kind of boating, it didn't make any sense to buy anything else. So we got one.

We still much prefer the look of the Victory Tug and there are other boats we prefer to the GB in terms of asthetics. But for what we want to do and what we wanted to spend, it has proved to be a good and reliable choice.

But we do get tired of seeing them everywhere we turn out on the water.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:07 PM   #24
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This thread sorta got hijacked from the venturi question to forward-slanted pilothouse windows. As for the original point, I hope anyone who's used to driving a trawler from the flybridge doesn't want to eliminate the venturi. Cannot imagine a back-slanting "windshield" up there would be as effective in keeping us out of the breeze.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:20 PM   #25
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I suspect the forward-slanting venturi panels build up air pressure in front of them and this forces the air to spill over the top in a much higher "wave" than if the panels were raked backwards.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:24 PM   #26
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I suspect the forward-slanting venturi panels build up air pressure in front of them and this forces the air to spill over the top in a much higher "wave" than if the panels were raked backwards.
Marin! You're the Boeing guy! Let's get a full wind-tunnel analysis on this...
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:35 PM   #27
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My Venturi looks like hell from the years of San Diego Sun (Burnt Orange now)...... If they weren't so damn expensive, I would replace it.
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:03 PM   #28
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My Venturi looks like hell from the years of San Diego Sun (Burnt Orange now)...... If they weren't so damn expensive, I would replace it.
While it won't fix the color, if your panels are scratched (not gouged) a Meguiar's product called Mirror Glaze 17 Clear Plastic Cleaner does a pretty good job of removing surface haze and fine scratches. You can then follow it up with Mirror Glaze 10 Clear Plastic Polish.

We used the Clear Plastic Cleaner on the windshields of our Cessnas, Pipers, etc. in Hawaii back in the 70s and we still use it today on the Beaver windshields and GB venturis.

If your boat has flat venturi panels like ours it is not expensive to replace them. Any good plastics shop can make new ones and it's even easier if you give them the old ones to use as patterns. Don't be tempted to use Lexan if you do this. Lexan is stronger than Plexiglas but it's much more susceptible to scratching.

If your venturi panels are curved than it becomes a much more expensive proposition.
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:14 PM   #29
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While our opinon of the GBs aesthetics, or lack of them, didn't change we found that the GB36 was indeed well built, had a layout we liked, had a one-level, wide-ish walk-around main deck--- something we would never be without now in any boat---- was easy to handle, and had wonderful visibility out of those big windows I disliked the look of so much.
Ditto the Coot regarding the walk-around (360 degree) deck. That and 360-degree visibility from pilothouse and keel-protected propeller/rudder were on top of the list. Angle of pilothouse windows was not.
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:19 PM   #30
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drive a butt-ugly boat because reducing glare has become more important than driving a nice looking boat.
Still believe the Coot is handsome in an Ernest Borgnine (bless his soul) sort of way. The forward-leaning pilothouse windows give the boat a strong brow.

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Old 07-10-2012, 10:50 PM   #31
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Well, back to the comments about the plexiglass wind deflector or what ever you choose to call it that is on the bridge of many boats. Ours keeps the wind directed over our heads when we are seated and if I want the wind in my face which I often do, I either stand or take the remote auto pilot control and go out from under the bimini to have sun and wind. The one we have is also kind of smoke colored so it can cut a lot of glare when the angle of the sunlight is just right.
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Old 07-11-2012, 12:14 AM   #32
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Still believe the Coot is handsome in an Ernest Borgnine (bless his soul) sort of way. The forward-leaning pilothouse windows give the boat a strong brow.
Lookin' good there, Coot!
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Old 07-11-2012, 04:35 AM   #33
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Over here in Oz, they seem to just be called windshields or 'deflectors'. On the other tack, I quite like the reverse angled windscreens in the front of a proper pilothouse type of vessel, to me they sort of just look 'right' - business-like, if you like...
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Old 07-11-2012, 08:12 AM   #34
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It is popularly called a Venturi windshield, I think.
That's about it. On large ships the wind deflector is actually made of two curved pieces that accelerate the air passing between them to create a high velocity "air wall" that keeps all but the heaviest rain and spray off the person standing on the bridge wing.

On little boats it is normally just called a windshield. Windows are called windows and not many flybridges have windows unless they are walled in like an oxygen tent.

Many people with slanted wheelhouse windows think they are more "salty" than those that don't for some peculiar reason.
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:47 AM   #35
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... On the other tack, I quite like the reverse angled windscreens in the front of a proper pilothouse type of vessel, to me they sort of just look 'right' - business-like, if you like...
I quite agree with you, Peter, like our flagship Selene on the banner above. That is one beautiful boat!!
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:13 PM   #36
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I have often heard the flybridge plexiglass wind deflector referred to as "Viser Glass." I have no idea where that comes from.

Larry B.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:23 PM   #37
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Many people with slanted wheelhouse windows think they are more "salty" than those that don't for some peculiar reason.
This is about as salty a boat as one can find. Clyde puffers served the little coastal communities in northern Scotland and Ireland for decades. Back and forth across the Irish Sea (a body of water with a bad reputation) anchor off the town, tide goes out, boat sits on its flat bottom, horses and carts and later tractors and wagons come out on the seabed to the boat and are loaded. No silly, pretentious wannabe windows here.

On the other hand....... RNLI lifeboat on a call on the same body of water.



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Old 07-11-2012, 10:41 PM   #38
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My favorite slanted window boat. Just completed construction at Dakota Creek ship yards, Anacortes

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