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Old 06-14-2014, 11:23 PM   #21
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Forget the term trawler when looking for and evaluating a boat as all posts above point out Its no longer a meaningful descriptive term. You would be best to define a boat by the type of hull and how it is to be used. Most of the old timers remember when the term denoted a full displacement hull good fuel economy long range with substantial living accommodations and fish boat heritage.
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:51 AM   #22
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Designating terms "Yacht" and "Trawler" are the two most adaptive (often misleading) word meanings in the marine world.

If the boat is used for private affairs - - > It is a "Pleasure Cruiser"

If the boat is used for business affairs - - -> It is a "Working Craft"

If the boat is not used for any affair - - > It is a "Wasted Boat"

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Old 06-15-2014, 01:10 AM   #23
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Designating terms "Yacht" and "Trawler" are the two most adaptive (often misleading) word meanings in the marine world.
They are all just boats. You decide what you want your boat to do and then you find the one that matches best. You don't get bogged down in labels. Don't fall victim to preconceptions or misconceptions.

Wifey B: Or conception.....hehe.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:01 AM   #24
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Buyers seem to think they know what a trawler is

The comments here are very much on point IMO. It seems difficult to define what a trawler is today yet friends and acquaintances looking for a next boat are heavily oriented toward trawlers.
It seems that buyers are certain they know what trawlers are but owners don't. This trawler bias is especially strong among sailors considering moving to power. They want low fuel consumption and believe that only comes with boats named trawler by the makers.
If the makers marketing department called the boat a trawler then is seems to be a trawler regardless of hull design, power, or interior design.

The things that seem to define a trawler in the minds of buyers are primarily low power and a sailboat look. Few people seem to understand that with a given displacement and hull shape fuel use is determined by the amount of power used. If it takes 100 HP to move a boat at 8 knots the fuel use will be similar with 150 HP engines or 400 HP engines at that speed. Try telling that to a sail boater.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:16 AM   #25
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That's basically what is hard in the boating community now compared to 50 years ago...less people really understand boats.

I have a friend with a 42 foot sailboat that is ready to retire and he thinks it's time to go cruising.

He is the classic armchair boater. 90% of his knowledge is from mags and boatshows.

He's been boating and sailing for 40+ years yet was a "total" newbie when another friend and I helped him move his boat to Charleston a few years ago. Since then he's never anchored the boat in the last 5 years...even though he just replaced the anchors and chain (both were perfect) because he "thought" they needed to after reading something... Then the gadget and boat show type he is...shows up with a kellet and other trinkets every year after the big shows...still has never anchored the boat.

While I love him like a brother...I wouldn't want anyone near and dear to me to go off sailing with him....too much armchair...too little sea time (even with his USCG license and sailing endorsement).

He's talking trawler now...he worries about money in retirement and then out of the other side of his mouth he mentions a new Ranger Tug...I laugh so hard I can't stand it.

He's just like so many...hopefully he will find his way and live a long, happy retirement fulfilling his cruising dreams one way or another...I seriously doubt it will ACTUALLY match his current dreams...like so many.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:28 AM   #26
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Indeed, I love the term armchair boater.
So much information but so little knowledge.
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:58 AM   #27
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NOT a trawler:

This is not a trawler either...

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Old 06-15-2014, 10:10 AM   #28
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My definition of "trawler" is, full displacement, small diesel (usually single, not always), and slow by design not choice. The kk42 is the prime example. No one need argue as to is it or is it not a trawler. The argument I see most often is from folks that dont really have a trawler but want to be with the "in" crowd. A liveaboard dock master once told me he lived on a trawler. It was a planing hull cruiser of older vintage with 375 hp 3208s. He did so want it to be a trawler, therefor it was. Or so he told folks. Or maybe he just didnt know, possibly his broker had told him it was a trawler.
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Old 06-15-2014, 10:23 AM   #29
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kulas:

Slow by design not use, I like that if you mean hull design not power installed.
While I agree with you that the KK42 fits my idea of a trawler most people think the GB 42 is also a trawler. While the GB is a beautiful boat and many have been sold as trawlers it is very far from the KK IMO, as are very many of the boats discussed here.
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:10 AM   #30
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My 360 hp / 500 fpt 1967 "Classic Luxury Muscle Car" (automobile) Buick Wildcat is not a Trawler either. However... I do occasionally go trolling for "Trawlers" (boats) in her.

In reference to quote from “bayview” post # 24: [Quote] “Few people seem to understand that with a given displacement and hull shape fuel use is determined by the amount of power used. If it takes 100 HP to move a boat at 8 knots the fuel use will be similar with 150 HP engines or 400 HP engines at that speed.” [End Quote]

That quote is spot-on! Same reality has been mentioned on other TF posts in recent years during nmpg debates. Soooo, I’d just like to add: Because a boat hull design is displacement and it can only travel at a relatively slow speed to continue reasonable nmpg fuel use (before digging a hole that consumes umpteen gpnm) that slow speed can also be utilized for really good nmpg fuel usage on most planing hull boats. Therefore, IMHO, if anyone would like to utilize the term “Trawler” for a boat – both hull designs can suffice!

Some of the clear reactionary differences between displacement “Trawlers” and planing “Trawlers” (i.e. Boats):

One draws a lot of water and rolls heavily/smoothly as it returns to perpendicular in beam seas with economical fuel use yet a limited continuous slow speed of travel.

One draws less water and does not roll heavily but its return is an abrupt-chop to perpendicular in beam seas with economical use at slow speeds yet capability to power up to fast plane which can smooth the ride, shorten trip’s duration, and use considerably more fuel!

Our fully self contained, twin screw gas engine 34’ Tolly tri cabin planing hull can putter along at 5.5 knots employing a single screw and get near 3 nmpg / puttering at 7 + knots using twins she gets 2 + nmpg / on plane at 16/17 knots she gets 1 nmpg / at 21 + knots near WOT she gets OMG nmpg!

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Nomenclature is in the mind of the speaker. Reality is in front of everybody... just gotta focus and play with the availabilities!

Happy Trawler (err Boating) Daze! - Art
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:34 AM   #31
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Fuel efficiency is part of what makes a trawler a trawler but only a small part.

Weight is probably the greatest identifying element of a trawler. They (trawlers) were called "Heavy Cruisers" before the word trawler evolved. With the extra weight slow speed was a given and the only way to better that is/was a SD or FD hull form and/or diesel power. For more stability and a small speed advantage the SD hull became much more popular and the Diesel engine standard. So a fairly heavy diesel powered cruiser evolved that needed a cuter name .... trawler came from somewhere and stuck.
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:40 AM   #32
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Fuel efficiency is part of what makes a trawler a trawler but only a small part
trawlers are not more efficient because they are named trawlers though many seem to think so.
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:45 AM   #33
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Fuel efficiency is part of what makes a trawler a trawler but only a small part.

Weight is probably the greatest identifying element of a trawler. They (trawlers) were called "Heavy Cruisers" before the word trawler evolved. With the extra weight slow speed was a given and the only way to better that is/was a SD or FD hull form and/or diesel power. For more stability and a very small speed advantage the SD hull became much more popular and the Diesel engine standard. So a fairly heavy diesel powered cruiser evolved that needed a cuter name .... trawler came from somewhere and stuck.
Good one Eric!

If I may add: Since inception of the word (designating term) "Trawler" in manner you mention the same word (designation) has been stretched to its limits! Similar to the word (term) "Yacht" being used so freely. And, in dirt based RE the term "Estate" experiencing similar outlandish "term-adjustments". I recently noted a RE ad for a double wide trailer in trailer park rented lot that mentioned the words "This Estate has..." Don of Moonstruck would cringe at reading that copy - LOL
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:49 AM   #34
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Absolutely I mean hull design. Any boat less than 50 feet that will go faster than 10 knots is not a trawler (assuming normal beam width) A planing hull with tiny engines is still a planing hull. It will never be a "trawler" no matter how much I want it to be. No matter who says it is or how it is used. I have a 48 foot sporty that I am planning to put a pair of small engines in, mostly to improve the economy of using it and to make it more usable for us. It will never be a trawler. I am not trying to convince anyone that it will be a trawler when I'm done. Even tho it will meet what most here will call a trawler. It doesnt have the look but a lot of boats that people call trawlers dont. I dont succumb to the "lifestyle" argument of what is a trawler, it is tangible and definable. Back in 1975 if you had a 67 Buick and told anyone they would have said "why?'. It was out of style and seriously looked down upon. Gas guzzler was an oft used term. A Pinto now that was in style, Vegas, the then new Datsuns, thats what everyone thought was "cool". Times change and fads with it. Being a trawler may not be popular in 10 years, then what will we want to be ? By the way, I love old Buicks. I drove a 1969 Wildcat with the 430 engine in high school. Dad bought it CHEAP in 1979, nobody wanted a big ol "gas guzzler" back then.
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Old 06-15-2014, 11:50 AM   #35
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When I bought my boat, some people asked, "why did you buy an old man's boat?"

That is a pretty apt description, even if it a generalization based on demographics.
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:07 PM   #36
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kulas44,
I agree and that's basically what I think but often what we as individuals think just isn't so.

I have an old Buick too and to some extent I think it's cool ... but it's not cool at all. The only people that do think it kinda cool are old .. like Spy alluded to. Or perhaps the retro crowd of which there are quite a few but still few. But most of us trawlermen are old.

I'd like to know more about your boat and small engine plans.

Can't out Buick Art but here's my Buick. Newer than Art's and probably less than 300hp. Love driv'in it but parking spaces get real small.

Art re the "estate" thing I think somebody died.
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:08 PM   #37
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When I bought my boat, some people asked, "why did you buy an old man's boat?"
People asked me a similar question -- "Too old to cut the mustard with the sailboat life any more, huh?" (Answer: correct.)
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:08 PM   #38
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Greetings,
Trawlers: Veritable chick magnets!
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:09 PM   #39
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Kulkas:
you realize that smaller engines wont make much difference in fuel use at a fixed speed of say 6 knots.
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Old 06-15-2014, 12:29 PM   #40
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Kulkas:
you realize that smaller engines wont make much difference in fuel use at a fixed speed of say 6 knots.
Quick calcs (no real basis on all prices, just good guesses - lol):

Engine remove/replace total coat = $25K + (could reach $50K + too)

Fuel cost reduction for 200 hrs annual at 2 +/- gallons per hr less in $5 ger gal range = $2K per year fuel cost savings

Break Even = 12.5 years to 25 years

Simple Math is soooo easy - - > So is simply enjoying a boat!

Happy Cruising Daze
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